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April 25, 2000 | SOREN BAKER
** CYPRESS HILL "Skull & Bones" Columbia On its fifth full-length studio album (in stores today), the Los Angeles quartet abandons its trailblazing ways in favor of a safer, more predictable approach. There's nothing wrong with attempting to fit in with contemporary sounds, but Cypress Hill's new direction pales next to its normally abrasive, raucous sonic and lyrical agenda.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1999 | SOREN BAKER
*** 1/2 Cypress Hill, "Los Grandes Exitos En Espan~ol," Columbia. The Los Angeles group's music sounds potent in any language, at least if these Spanish-language versions (in stores Tuesday) of some of its better songs are any indication. Rappers B-Real and Sen Dog translate the lyrics of such monumental hits as "How I Could Just Kill a Man" and "Insane in the Brain," but it's the formidable, true-to-the-originals work of producer DJ Muggs that stands out.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1996 | Steve Hochman
After a little arm-twisting, several radio programmers were willing to pick virtual unknowns that they believe will become household names in the coming months. St. James picks the debut album by Delinquent Habits, a bilingual L.A. rap trio produced by Cypress Hill's Sen Dog. The single "Tres Delinquentes" is already one of the hottest songs on the station.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2000 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cypress Hill is in control. Control, y'all. That's secret No. 1 to being a rap group with 10 successful years behind you, in a ruthlessly trendy industry where new acts come and go with hummingbird speed. Secret No. 2, they say, is the support of cannabis smokers the world over. No joke. As was the case with the Grateful Dead, the evil weed is a cornerstone of Cypress Hill's lyrics and stage show, and lead rapper B-Real credits a huge core fan base of potheads for his group's enduring success.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1992 | DENNIS HUNT
"Man, this joint ain't nothin'," says a chuckling B-Real of the rap trio Cypress Hill, taking a deep drag from his marijuana cigarette. "Bob Marley and Peter Tosh and those reggae singers--they had joints that make this look like a toothpick." Sitting in a Century City office with his feet up on the table, B-Real, 22, does nothing to hide his pot-smoking. Not only does Cypress Hill brazenly smoke pot on stage (never encountering arrest), the group also calls for its legalization.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1995 | Cheo H. Coker
CYPRESS HILL, "Cypress Hill III (Temple of Boom)"; Ruffhouse/Sony (*** 1/2) Other groups may catch the political heat, but Cypress Hill is every bit as gangsta as its hard-core brethren--and just as funky. "III" finds the South Gate trio the same as they ever were: hooked on B-Real and Sen-Dog's tales of gunfights, reputation tests and potent marijuana, their sound smoothed out with DJ Muggs' engaging mix of horn bleats, eerie synthesizer squeals and snapping drum kicks.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | SOREN BAKER
*** 1/2 Cypress Hill, "IV," RuffHouse/Columbia. Cypress. Hill's 1991 self-titled debut album is one of the decade's most influential hip-hop records. Rappers B-Real and Sen Dog and producer Muggs created their own niche in the segmented hip-hop market by introducing an abundance of marijuana references and a warped, psychedelic production style into their street-level entertainment. The album thrust the Los Angeles-based crew into hip-hop's elite.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1996 | Steve Hochman
CYPRESS STILL: With Cypress Hill coming to town for a Universal Amphitheatre show next Sunday, word was coming in from the road that the hemped-up hip-hop trio was splitting. In fact, reports from some shows were that the group had already broken up in everything but name, as rapper B Real was the only member actually performing. Not true, says Cypress Hill manager Happy Walters.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's no mystery to Cypress Hill, the South Gate hip-hop trio, why its "Black Sunday" album entered the pop charts at No. 1, blowing away such superstar competition as U2 and Barbra Streisand. In a word: cannabis. "We smoke pot and we rap about it," said Sen Dog, the trio's 27-year-old Latino rapper whose real name is Senen Reyes. "That's what gives Cypress Hill our bugged-out edge." Puffing on a joint in his manager's West Hollywood office, Cypress Hill cohort B-Real agreed.
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