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Sen Harry Reid

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NATIONAL
June 5, 2010 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
If Republican Sharron Angle wins her party's Senate primary Tuesday, it will be a victory for the soft-spoken perpetual candidate, Nevada's conservative diehards, the national "tea party" movement and underdogs everywhere. It will also be a huge win for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. The Nevada Democrat has been working for months — some might say years — to cast his own opponent in the against-all-odds drama that is his reelection campaign. With dismal approval ratings and an anti-incumbent political climate, Reid is so vulnerable that Washington insiders have been debating who the next majority leader might be. But Reid, known to some in Nevada as the "meddler in chief," is considered a master of nudging pieces to fall just so. And so it appears that during the GOP primary he is trying — with some success — to boost his chances of a general election victory.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
January 24, 2013 | By David Horsey
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid shocked and infuriated many of his fellow Democrats on Thursday when he backed away from his pledge to put an end to the curse of the filibuster. Minority Republicans have been flagrantly using the old filibuster ploy to block even the most mundane bills unless they can win votes from at least 60 of 100 senators. This has effectively stunted the Democrats' 53-seat majority and stifled initiatives from the Obama White House.  In times past, the filibuster was a rarely invoked parliamentary rule that allowed a single senator to halt legislative business if he was willing to stay on the Senate floor and talk for hour after hour, risking a raw throat, sleep deprivation and a distended bladder.
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NATIONAL
March 12, 2010 | By Kathleen Hennessey
The wife and daughter of Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid were seriously injured in a car wreck Thursday when their vehicle was rear-ended by a tractor-trailer on a Washington-area interstate, a spokesman said. Landra Reid and her adult daughter, Lana Reid Barringer, were hospitalized with what doctors described as non-life-threatening injuries, according to a statement from Jon Summers, a spokesman for the Nevada Democrat. Landra Reid, 69, suffered the more serious injuries, including a broken back, neck and nose.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
Senate leaders have averted, for now, a showdown over a group of President Obama's judicial nominees, reaching a tentative agreement that would allow the chamber to pick up the pace on confirmations. The truce comes after Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) took the unusual move of trying to force a vote Wednesday on 17 nominees who had bipartisan backing but faced opposition from some Republicans trying to stall the president's picks for the federal courts. Under the agreement, the Senate will instead work to confirm 14 judicial nominees by May 7 - not as many as Democrats sought, but a schedule that would require about three confirmation votes a week while the Senate is in session, more than has been the norm.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas and Ashley Powers
Standing in the heart of the nation's hard-hit foreclosure country, President Obama on Friday rolled out a $1.5-billion mortgage program meant for a handful of states, including California and Nevada, that have endured waves of home foreclosures during the recession. The president also used the moment to give a needed boost to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid's reelection chances, crediting him with helping stave off a depression over the last year Obama spoke to 1,800 people at a town hall-style event as part of a two-day Western swing in which he raised money for Democrats and campaigned for two senators facing tough campaigns: Reid and Michael Bennet of Colorado.
NATIONAL
July 26, 2010 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
Rory Reid would like to be Nevada's next governor, but there's a problem. Not a lack of money: He's got plenty of that. Not a shortage of ideas: He's got plenty of those. It's that last name, Reid. As in Harry Reid, the Senate Democratic leader, Rory's dad and one of the most unpopular politicians in America, not to mention his home state of Nevada. Both are on the ballot in November: Harry, 70, battling for a fifth term, Rory, 47, making his first try for state office. Good luck finding them in the same room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1990
The letter from Vernon W. Latshaw (Feb. 8) doesn't tell the whole story. There are 13 states that tax pensions of people who have moved to other states. An additional 31 states have the mechanism in place to begin this practice. A retiree could very likely be taxed in two states (or possibly more) on his pension income! Two members of Congress have introduced bills to prohibit this practice. Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) has introduced SB 434, which has three co-sponsors and Rep. Barbara Vucanovich (R-Nev.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1993
In response to "Perot Takes Shots at Economic Proposal," March 3: Ross Perot was invited to speak, at his own expense, at the Joint Committee on the Organization of Congress to reform Congress. During the 2 1/2-hour session Perot spoke for a large number of American people and was treated with respect by all members, except one. The four paragraphs your article dedicated to Sen. Harry Reid's (D-Nev.) attack on Perot is a distortion of what took place. Reid should resign from this committee as unqualified.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2010 | James Rainey
The Las Vegas Review-Journal has gone to great lengths to make clear its loathing for U.S. Sen. Harry Reid. The newspaper's publisher regularly writes about why the Senate majority leader is "so dumb." The editor gives moral support to Reid's election challenger, "tea party" darling Sharron Angle. Nevada's largest daily newspaper even raised the dead this week in its Reid fatwa . It prominently featured a news story about an octogenarian's obituary because the old woman's relatives made clear in her death notice that she really didn't like Reid.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2013 | By David Horsey
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid shocked and infuriated many of his fellow Democrats on Thursday when he backed away from his pledge to put an end to the curse of the filibuster. Minority Republicans have been flagrantly using the old filibuster ploy to block even the most mundane bills unless they can win votes from at least 60 of 100 senators. This has effectively stunted the Democrats' 53-seat majority and stifled initiatives from the Obama White House.  In times past, the filibuster was a rarely invoked parliamentary rule that allowed a single senator to halt legislative business if he was willing to stay on the Senate floor and talk for hour after hour, risking a raw throat, sleep deprivation and a distended bladder.
NEWS
November 17, 2010 | Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid announced late Wednesday that the Senate will proceed with votes in the lame-duck session on two Democratic priority issues -- repealing the ban on gays serving openly in the military, and legislation to allow a path to citizenship for young illegal immigrants. Reid's decision to pursue both items indicates Democrats are unwilling to cede their top issues despite overwhelming Republican gains in the midterm elections. Both issues face opposition from Republicans.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Sen. Harry Reid strolled into Nevada Democratic Party headquarters just before lunch Tuesday to thank volunteers busily phoning voters who had yet to cast their ballots. He handed a small loaf of banana nut bread wrapped in yellow cellophane to Ruth Fuggins, though she wasn't exactly sure why. Fuggins, a 66-year-old retired bank supervisor, has been volunteering for the Democrat's campaign for about a year, but doesn't know Reid personally. Regardless, she was touched by the somewhat awkward gesture: Reid isn't a show boater and Fuggins appreciated that.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Ashley Powers and P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
Democratic Sen. Harry Reid bested Republican upstart Sharron Angle to win the U.S. Senate contest in Nevada, a costly, closely watched brawl that pitted one of President Obama's top lieutenants against a "tea party" favorite. Outside groups poured millions of dollars into a race that many political observers saw as a referendum on Obama administration policies, which Reid had guided through the Senate. Angle bashed the policies throughout the campaign as doing little to help bring down Nevada's stubbornly high unemployment rate.
NEWS
November 1, 2010 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
When Sen. Harry Reid introduced Michelle Obama on Monday, he referred to the first lady as "the closer. " Reid and Pennsylvania Senate hopeful Joe Sestak certainly hope that's the case. Obama revved up hundreds of supporters in Nevada on the eve of the midterm elections and was slated to headline a rally at the University of Pennsylvania later in the day. Democrats Reid and Sestak are locked in too-close-to-call battles that could determine whether their party hangs onto control of the U.S. Senate.
OPINION
October 28, 2010 | Doyle McManus
There are many close races for the U.S. Senate this year, and many strange ones, but the bitter contest between two unlovable candidates in quirky Nevada is, for my money, the closest, strangest race of all. The Democratic candidate, Sen. Harry Reid, is one of the most powerful men in Washington, a master at steering billion-dollar federal projects to his economically busted state ? not someone you'd expect to find locked in a desperate fight for his political life. His Republican challenger, Sharron Angle, is a gaffe-prone "tea party" firebrand who canceled most of her public appearances in the last week of the campaign to avoid more missteps.
NEWS
October 20, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Vice President Joe Biden on Wednesday lashed out at Republicans and called the new crop of conservative Senate candidates extremists who represent a sharp break with the party’s traditions. Campaigning in Nevada for Sen. Harry Reid, running slightly behind "tea party" movement favorite Sharron Angle, Biden sounded what has become one of the Democrats' main tropes in this midterm election cycle: The tea party has pushed the GOP too far to the right. “If in fact, Harry’s opponent were unique,” Biden said,  “You’d say, OK, it doesn’t matter a whole lot. “It matters a whole lot to the people of Nevada but, It doesn’t matter a whole lot to America,” Biden said.
NATIONAL
December 30, 2009 | Mcclatchy Newspapers
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) will force a vote on President Obama's nominee to lead the Transportation Security Administration when Congress reconvenes in three weeks. Reid's announcement Tuesday that he will file a motion for cloture, a procedural step to limit debate and lead to a roll-call vote, follows the alleged attempt by a Nigerian extremist to blow up a Detroit-bound commercial flight on Christmas Day. Reid had sought Senate consent to confirm TSA nominee Erroll Southers without floor debate, along with multiple other nominations, before the Senate adjourned for its winter break Christmas Eve. Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Sen. Harry Reid strolled into Nevada Democratic Party headquarters just before lunch Tuesday to thank volunteers busily phoning voters who had yet to cast their ballots. He handed a small loaf of banana nut bread wrapped in yellow cellophane to Ruth Fuggins, though she wasn't exactly sure why. Fuggins, a 66-year-old retired bank supervisor, has been volunteering for the Democrat's campaign for about a year, but doesn't know Reid personally. Regardless, she was touched by the somewhat awkward gesture: Reid isn't a show boater and Fuggins appreciated that.
NATIONAL
October 19, 2010 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Seeking to channel the sign-bearing, flag-waving enthusiasm of the "tea party" movement into ballot-box victories, former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin told hundreds of supporters Monday they couldn't "party like it's 1773" until Washington was flooded with like-minded conservatives. "I can see November from my house!" said Palin in a self-deprecating call to action that had been reprinted on buttons. Though an exuberant Palin plugged Sharron Angle, the Republican running neck-and-neck with Nevada Sen. Harry Reid, Palin spent much of her 26-minute speech denouncing the policies of Democrats, whose base is dispirited and whose congressional majorities are at stake in November.
NATIONAL
July 26, 2010 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
Rory Reid would like to be Nevada's next governor, but there's a problem. Not a lack of money: He's got plenty of that. Not a shortage of ideas: He's got plenty of those. It's that last name, Reid. As in Harry Reid, the Senate Democratic leader, Rory's dad and one of the most unpopular politicians in America, not to mention his home state of Nevada. Both are on the ballot in November: Harry, 70, battling for a fifth term, Rory, 47, making his first try for state office. Good luck finding them in the same room.
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