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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1987
Now that Hart is a contender again, I would recommend that Sen. Joe Biden (D-Del.) borrow Hart's speech so that he can also re-enter the race. AL FARRELL Beverly Hills
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NATIONAL
November 25, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Ted Kaufman, a former aide to Sen. Joe Biden, was named by Delaware Gov. Ruth Ann Minner to fill the Senate seat Biden is leaving for the vice presidency. Kaufman plans to serve until the 2010 election, when a new senator is elected. Speculation on Biden's successor had focused on his son, Atty. Gen. Beau Biden. But last week Beau Biden announced that he planned to fulfill his Army National Guard duties and wouldn't accept an appointment to his father's seat. Beau Biden is a prosecutor for the 261st Signal Brigade, which left for Iraq last week.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The publisher of Sen. Joe Biden's memoir, an instant bestseller for the presumed vice presidential nominee, is being reissued in paperback with a first printing of 100,000. According to Nielsen BookScan, which tracks about 70% of sales, "Promises to Keep" had sold only 15,000 copies before last weekend's announcement that Sen. Barack Obama had chosen Biden as his running mate. The memoir from Random House Publishing Group quickly reached the top 25 on Amazon.com and was out of stock as of Monday.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
President-elect Barack Obama is resigning his Senate seat effective Sunday. In a statement, he called his four years in the Capitol "one of the highest honors and privileges" of his life. Under state law, Democratic Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich will appoint Obama's replacement, who will serve the remaining two years of his term. Blagojevich has ruled out appointing himself. The vice president-elect, Sen. Joe Biden of Delaware, may remain in the Senate until January. His vote could be needed in the lame-duck session of Congress that begins next week.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
President-elect Barack Obama is resigning his Senate seat effective Sunday. In a statement, he called his four years in the Capitol "one of the highest honors and privileges" of his life. Under state law, Democratic Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich will appoint Obama's replacement, who will serve the remaining two years of his term. Blagojevich has ruled out appointing himself. The vice president-elect, Sen. Joe Biden of Delaware, may remain in the Senate until January. His vote could be needed in the lame-duck session of Congress that begins next week.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Ted Kaufman, a former aide to Sen. Joe Biden, was named by Delaware Gov. Ruth Ann Minner to fill the Senate seat Biden is leaving for the vice presidency. Kaufman plans to serve until the 2010 election, when a new senator is elected. Speculation on Biden's successor had focused on his son, Atty. Gen. Beau Biden. But last week Beau Biden announced that he planned to fulfill his Army National Guard duties and wouldn't accept an appointment to his father's seat. Beau Biden is a prosecutor for the 261st Signal Brigade, which left for Iraq last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2008 | TINA DAUNT
SOMETIMES life really does imitate art. As the Democratic National Convention was kicking off, actor Richard Schiff, who played the White House communications director on "West Wing," was holding court with a pack of reporters on a concrete version of a red carpet outside of a restaurant here. The Emmy Award-winning actor was completely at ease talking about real-life politics and his favorite politician, Sen. Joe Biden. Schiff met Biden several years ago and immediately saw him as the "real deal."
NATIONAL
August 27, 2008 | Nicole Gaouette, Times Staff Writer
Jill Biden was teaching in a locked psychiatric unit at the Rockford Center in Delaware when one of her teenage students started spiraling out of control. He was on his feet, aggressive and abusive. In back of the class, a burly aide sprang up, ready to intervene. Biden shot him a look that said, "Wait." In just a few moments, the situation was defused without disruption or force. "She was able to talk that kid back into the appropriate behavior, and she did it by conveying that she understood how he was feeling," said Dana Garrett, the aide, who vividly remembers the incident two decades ago. "She didn't have an air of status about her. Someone else had to tell me she was the wife of the senator."
NATIONAL
August 25, 2008 | Peter Nicholas, Times Staff Writer
Spend a few hours with Sen. Joe Biden on a train, plane or automobile and try to squeeze a word in now and then. No easy thing. Barack Obama's pick for vice president is a talker. In a business that attracts and rewards the loquacious set, the Delaware senator's verbal output is a Capitol Hill legend. So notorious is he for windy soliloquies that Biden was asked in a presidential debate last year whether he was, in essence, a gaffe waiting to happen. Would he be able to restrain himself on the world stage, where ill-chosen words can create real trouble?
NATIONAL
August 27, 2008 | Maura Reynolds and Janet Hook, Times Staff Writers
The Foreign Relations Committee is hardly the most popular Senate panel. Many senators shun what they see as all talk and no action -- no pork-barrel projects for constituents or popular tax cuts to write into law. But it was on this somewhat esoteric panel that the fast-rising junior senator from Illinois, Barack Obama, forged a relationship with his future running mate, Sen. Joe Biden of Delaware. Perhaps oddly, it was the committee's senior Republican, Sen. Richard G. Lugar of Indiana, who helped foster the friendship between the two Democrats.
NATIONAL
August 27, 2008 | Maura Reynolds and Janet Hook, Times Staff Writers
The Foreign Relations Committee is hardly the most popular Senate panel. Many senators shun what they see as all talk and no action -- no pork-barrel projects for constituents or popular tax cuts to write into law. But it was on this somewhat esoteric panel that the fast-rising junior senator from Illinois, Barack Obama, forged a relationship with his future running mate, Sen. Joe Biden of Delaware. Perhaps oddly, it was the committee's senior Republican, Sen. Richard G. Lugar of Indiana, who helped foster the friendship between the two Democrats.
NATIONAL
August 27, 2008 | Nicole Gaouette, Times Staff Writer
Jill Biden was teaching in a locked psychiatric unit at the Rockford Center in Delaware when one of her teenage students started spiraling out of control. He was on his feet, aggressive and abusive. In back of the class, a burly aide sprang up, ready to intervene. Biden shot him a look that said, "Wait." In just a few moments, the situation was defused without disruption or force. "She was able to talk that kid back into the appropriate behavior, and she did it by conveying that she understood how he was feeling," said Dana Garrett, the aide, who vividly remembers the incident two decades ago. "She didn't have an air of status about her. Someone else had to tell me she was the wife of the senator."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The publisher of Sen. Joe Biden's memoir, an instant bestseller for the presumed vice presidential nominee, is being reissued in paperback with a first printing of 100,000. According to Nielsen BookScan, which tracks about 70% of sales, "Promises to Keep" had sold only 15,000 copies before last weekend's announcement that Sen. Barack Obama had chosen Biden as his running mate. The memoir from Random House Publishing Group quickly reached the top 25 on Amazon.com and was out of stock as of Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2008 | TINA DAUNT
SOMETIMES life really does imitate art. As the Democratic National Convention was kicking off, actor Richard Schiff, who played the White House communications director on "West Wing," was holding court with a pack of reporters on a concrete version of a red carpet outside of a restaurant here. The Emmy Award-winning actor was completely at ease talking about real-life politics and his favorite politician, Sen. Joe Biden. Schiff met Biden several years ago and immediately saw him as the "real deal."
NATIONAL
August 25, 2008 | Peter Nicholas, Times Staff Writer
Spend a few hours with Sen. Joe Biden on a train, plane or automobile and try to squeeze a word in now and then. No easy thing. Barack Obama's pick for vice president is a talker. In a business that attracts and rewards the loquacious set, the Delaware senator's verbal output is a Capitol Hill legend. So notorious is he for windy soliloquies that Biden was asked in a presidential debate last year whether he was, in essence, a gaffe waiting to happen. Would he be able to restrain himself on the world stage, where ill-chosen words can create real trouble?
NEWS
July 7, 2008 | Jonathan Chait, Jonathan Chait, a contributing editor to Opinion and a senior editor at the New Republic, is the author of "The Big Con: The True Story of How Washington Got Hoodwinked and Hijacked by Crackpot Economics."
Spend a little time with Barack Obama on his wide-open vice president hunt. There are plenty of plausible candidates, and the eventual choice could easily be somebody nobody is talking about. Why the unpredictability? In part, it's because a veep search usually focuses on the runner-up in the primary, but in this case almost nobody believes the runner-up will get chosen. But the main reason is that Obama is an unconventional candidate. He has novel strengths -- enormous appeal to the young, African Americans and some crossover Republicans -- and he also has potential weaknesses with usually solid Democratic Party constituencies: white blue-collar Democrats, women and Jews.
NEWS
July 7, 2008 | Jonathan Chait, Jonathan Chait, a contributing editor to Opinion and a senior editor at the New Republic, is the author of "The Big Con: The True Story of How Washington Got Hoodwinked and Hijacked by Crackpot Economics."
Spend a little time with Barack Obama on his wide-open vice president hunt. There are plenty of plausible candidates, and the eventual choice could easily be somebody nobody is talking about. Why the unpredictability? In part, it's because a veep search usually focuses on the runner-up in the primary, but in this case almost nobody believes the runner-up will get chosen. But the main reason is that Obama is an unconventional candidate. He has novel strengths -- enormous appeal to the young, African Americans and some crossover Republicans -- and he also has potential weaknesses with usually solid Democratic Party constituencies: white blue-collar Democrats, women and Jews.
NATIONAL
August 27, 2008
Theme "Securing America's Future" Notable speeches Former President Clinton Former Sen. Tom Daschle New Mexico Gov. Richardson Indiana Sen. Evan Bayh Massachusetts Sen. John F. Kerry Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid Headline speech by Sen. Joe Biden, vice presidential nominee Television coverage The network channels (ABC, CBS, NBC) will offer nightly prime-time coverage of the convention from 7 to 8 p.m. The cable news channels (MSNBC, CNN, Fox)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1987
Now that Hart is a contender again, I would recommend that Sen. Joe Biden (D-Del.) borrow Hart's speech so that he can also re-enter the race. AL FARRELL Beverly Hills
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