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Sen Joseph B Montoya

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NEWS
December 15, 1989 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Assemblyman Alister McAlister, testifying as a government expert in the trial of Sen. Joseph B. Montoya, acknowledged under cross-examination Thursday that he voted for a dummy FBI bill because he believed it might do some "small good." McAlister, who once ran for state controller calling himself "Honest McHonest," testified that he had no recollection of the bogus 1986 legislation pushed by undercover FBI agents even though the measure came before the Assembly committee he chaired.
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NEWS
December 15, 1989 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Assemblyman Alister McAlister, testifying as a government expert in the trial of Sen. Joseph B. Montoya, acknowledged under cross-examination Thursday that he voted for a dummy FBI bill because he believed it might do some "small good." McAlister, who once ran for state controller calling himself "Honest McHonest," testified that he had no recollection of the bogus 1986 legislation pushed by undercover FBI agents even though the measure came before the Assembly committee he chaired.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1986
Regarding SB 7, Sen. Joseph B. Montoya's (D-North Whittier) bill to require parental consent for a minor's abortion, I would like to point out that the pious platitudes about parental authority quickly fall by the wayside when the minor wants to keep the baby and the parents say, "Don't be silly! You have an abortion and finish your education." If the parents can veto a minor's abortion, shouldn't they also be able to require one? Better the choice, either pro or con, be left to the girl/woman herself.
NEWS
June 13, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
Speaking softly but decisively, state Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier) and his former aide, Amiel A. Jaramillo, pleaded innocent in federal court Monday to charges of using their public offices for extortion and racketeering. After their arraignment together, the two read terse statements expressing confidence that they will ultimately be found not guilty, but they refused to answer questions. Surrounded by staff, friends and family, Montoya said he would "vigorously defend my innocence during these court proceedings."
NEWS
June 13, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
Speaking softly but decisively, state Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier) and his former aide, Amiel A. Jaramillo, pleaded innocent in federal court Monday to charges of using their public offices for extortion and racketeering. After their arraignment together, the two read terse statements expressing confidence that they will ultimately be found not guilty, but they refused to answer questions. Surrounded by staff, friends and family, Montoya said he would "vigorously defend my innocence during these court proceedings."
NEWS
May 16, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
The first indictment of a legislator growing out of a three-year federal investigation of political corruption in the Capitol is expected soon--most likely in the next week or two, several sources familiar with the probe have told The Times. Almost nine months after FBI agents raided Capitol offices on Aug. 24, scrutiny of one lawmaker, Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier), has become particularly intense, these sources said. Late last week, a federal grand jury subpoenaed legislative committee records on at least four bills, including two authored by Montoya and two others that went through committees on which he served.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
When a top aide to Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier) called the owners of a small but burgeoning mail order contact lens business in San Diego last year, they were shaken by his news. An obscure bill, written by the California Optometric Assn., was due for a hearing before the Senate Business and Professions Committee, chaired by Montoya. If passed, the measure would very likely put the company, Dial A Contact Lens Inc., out of business. With minor variations, the various parties basically give this account: The Montoya aide, Amiel A. Jaramillo, advised the owners--a husband-and-wife team--to contact a Sacramento lobbyist, and among those he recommended was David Kim. They did. And what the lobbyist told Dieter and Jamie Hundt shook them even more--and provided a rare, behind-the-scenes insight into how private money often determines the course of little-noticed, special-interest legislation in Sacramento.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
When a top aide to Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier) called the owners of a small but growing mail order contact lens business in San Diego last year, they were shaken by his news. An obscure bill, written by the California Optometric Assn., was due for a hearing before the Senate Business and Professions Committee, chaired by Montoya. If passed, the measure would very likely put the company, Dial A Contact Lens Inc., out of business. With minor variations, the various parties basically give this account: Advised to Contact Lobbyist The Montoya aide, Amiel A. Jaramillo, advised the owners--a husband-and-wife team--to contact a Sacramento lobbyist, and among those he recommended was David Kim. They did. What the lobbyist told Dieter and Jamie Hundt shook them even more--and provided a rare, behind-the-scenes insight into how private money often determines the course of little-noticed, special-interest legislation in Sacramento.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writers
Actor Ed Asner, former sports agent Michael Trope and a Baldwin Park recycling company were among the "victims" of an alleged extortion scheme that led to the indictment of Sen. Joseph B. Montoya, sources familiar with the federal investigation said Thursday. The indictment of Montoya and a former top aide on 12 felony counts Wednesday resulted from the pair's systematic attempts to extort money from groups that had an interest in legislation, including Ross University on the island of Dominique and the NFL Players Assn.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | MARK GLADSTONE and DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writers
Sen. Joseph B. Montoya is known in Capitol circles as a combative and strong-willed loner, an outspoken man who will not go along just to get along with his Democratic Party or legislative colleagues. Montoya once called Democratic Assembly Speaker Willie Brown of San Francisco a "pathological liar." He accused the state's political watchdog agency of using "Gestapo tactics." And he refuses to automatically follow orders from Democratic leaders because, he says bluntly, "I'm not in the Communist Party."
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
When a top aide to Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier) called the owners of a small but burgeoning mail order contact lens business in San Diego last year, they were shaken by his news. An obscure bill, written by the California Optometric Assn., was due for a hearing before the Senate Business and Professions Committee, chaired by Montoya. If passed, the measure would very likely put the company, Dial A Contact Lens Inc., out of business. With minor variations, the various parties basically give this account: The Montoya aide, Amiel A. Jaramillo, advised the owners--a husband-and-wife team--to contact a Sacramento lobbyist, and among those he recommended was David Kim. They did. And what the lobbyist told Dieter and Jamie Hundt shook them even more--and provided a rare, behind-the-scenes insight into how private money often determines the course of little-noticed, special-interest legislation in Sacramento.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
When a top aide to Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier) called the owners of a small but growing mail order contact lens business in San Diego last year, they were shaken by his news. An obscure bill, written by the California Optometric Assn., was due for a hearing before the Senate Business and Professions Committee, chaired by Montoya. If passed, the measure would very likely put the company, Dial A Contact Lens Inc., out of business. With minor variations, the various parties basically give this account: Advised to Contact Lobbyist The Montoya aide, Amiel A. Jaramillo, advised the owners--a husband-and-wife team--to contact a Sacramento lobbyist, and among those he recommended was David Kim. They did. What the lobbyist told Dieter and Jamie Hundt shook them even more--and provided a rare, behind-the-scenes insight into how private money often determines the course of little-noticed, special-interest legislation in Sacramento.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writers
Actor Ed Asner, former sports agent Michael Trope and a Baldwin Park recycling company were among the "victims" of an alleged extortion scheme that led to the indictment of Sen. Joseph B. Montoya, sources familiar with the federal investigation said Thursday. The indictment of Montoya and a former top aide on 12 felony counts Wednesday resulted from the pair's systematic attempts to extort money from groups that had an interest in legislation, including Ross University on the island of Dominique and the NFL Players Assn.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | MARK GLADSTONE and DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writers
Sen. Joseph B. Montoya is known in Capitol circles as a combative and strong-willed loner, an outspoken man who will not go along just to get along with his Democratic Party or legislative colleagues. Montoya once called Democratic Assembly Speaker Willie Brown of San Francisco a "pathological liar." He accused the state's political watchdog agency of using "Gestapo tactics." And he refuses to automatically follow orders from Democratic leaders because, he says bluntly, "I'm not in the Communist Party."
NEWS
May 16, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
The first indictment of a legislator growing out of a three-year federal investigation of political corruption in the Capitol is expected soon--most likely in the next week or two, several sources familiar with the probe have told The Times. Almost nine months after FBI agents raided Capitol offices on Aug. 24, scrutiny of one lawmaker, Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier), has become particularly intense, these sources said. Late last week, a federal grand jury subpoenaed legislative committee records on at least four bills, including two authored by Montoya and two others that went through committees on which he served.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1986
Regarding SB 7, Sen. Joseph B. Montoya's (D-North Whittier) bill to require parental consent for a minor's abortion, I would like to point out that the pious platitudes about parental authority quickly fall by the wayside when the minor wants to keep the baby and the parents say, "Don't be silly! You have an abortion and finish your education." If the parents can veto a minor's abortion, shouldn't they also be able to require one? Better the choice, either pro or con, be left to the girl/woman herself.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | From Times wire services
State Sen. Joseph B. Montoya, who was convicted last week on seven felony counts of racketeering, extortion and money laundering, resigned from the state Senate today. The Whittier Democrat made the announcement in an address to friends and supporters at La Puente City Hall, where he began his career in government in 1968.
NEWS
November 24, 1985
The Maravilla Foundation, a nonprofit social service agency, has received an $80,000 grant from the state Office of Economic Opportunity, according to Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-El Monte), who announced the award. The money will be used to help low-income households make improvements on their homes in order to conserve energy.
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