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Sen Joseph Montoya

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OPINION
February 18, 1990
I was pleased to read that the bill passed the state Senate as it is a very reasonable piece of legislation. We should have the same waiting background check period for the purchase of shotguns and rifles as we do for handguns. Quite significantly, the bill was passed even without the support of (now former) Sen. Joseph Montoya, who has been convicted of multiple felonies. Would it not have been ironic if such an important bill had failed because its proponents did not receive a supportive vote from a convicted racketeer?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1991
Our state's governors and the California Legislature have had major battles over the construction of new prisons during the past several years. Govs. Deukmejian and Wilson have favored construction, while the Legislature has not. After reading about the standard mode of operation of our elected legislative officials during the last several years--including State Board of Equalization member (and former state Sen.) Paul Carpenter, state Sen. Joseph Montoya, state Sen. Alan Robbins and the "harshly rebuked" U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston--it's no wonder they don't want more jails.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1991
Our state's governors and the California Legislature have had major battles over the construction of new prisons during the past several years. Govs. Deukmejian and Wilson have favored construction, while the Legislature has not. After reading about the standard mode of operation of our elected legislative officials during the last several years--including State Board of Equalization member (and former state Sen.) Paul Carpenter, state Sen. Joseph Montoya, state Sen. Alan Robbins and the "harshly rebuked" U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston--it's no wonder they don't want more jails.
OPINION
February 18, 1990
I was pleased to read that the bill passed the state Senate as it is a very reasonable piece of legislation. We should have the same waiting background check period for the purchase of shotguns and rifles as we do for handguns. Quite significantly, the bill was passed even without the support of (now former) Sen. Joseph Montoya, who has been convicted of multiple felonies. Would it not have been ironic if such an important bill had failed because its proponents did not receive a supportive vote from a convicted racketeer?
NEWS
May 25, 1989
A bill by Sen. Joseph Montoya (D-Whittier) to regulate the placement of state parole offices has passed the Senate Judiciary Committee and will be heard by the Senate Appropriations Committee on June 5. The bill, which grew out of a controversy over location of parole offices in the San Gabriel Valley, would require the state Department of Corrections to develop guidelines for choosing sites and would prohibit placement within 500 yards of...
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
The Senate, reflecting concern over the extent of foreign investment in the state, voted Tuesday to require foreign businesses to disclose details of their operations in California. On a 22-6 vote, the Senate sent the bill by Sen. Joseph Montoya (D-Whittier) to the Assembly. One opponent, Sen. Ed Davis (R-Valencia), maintained that the proposal would encourage "bashing" of investors from Japan and other nations. But Montoya insisted: "We are not bashing anyone." In separate actions, the upper chamber also overwhelmingly approved legislation to toughen penalties against students who attack teachers but rejected a bill to require fast-food operations to label the type of oil used in cooking.
NEWS
June 19, 1989 | From United Press International
A Colorado businessman said Sunday he had to pay $20,000 to win passage of a bill authored by state Sen. Joseph Montoya (D-Whittier) and also to pay for lavish lunches and a hotel room for a Montoya aide and a "lady friend." Robin Kerns of Ft. Collins said he later ran out of money and refused to pay a $1,500 monthly retainer to Fred Shanbour, a lobbyist recommended by Montoya. As a result, he said, the law he wanted passed is now due to expire in the next two or three years. Kerns and his business partner, C.H. Carter, were flown to Sacramento at government expense and interviewed for more than three hours Friday by an FBI agent and federal prosecutor investigating Montoya and his relationship to various lobbyists.
NEWS
December 15, 1989 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Assemblyman Alister McAlister, testifying as a government expert in the trial of Sen. Joseph B. Montoya, acknowledged under cross-examination Thursday that he voted for a dummy FBI bill because he believed it might do some "small good." McAlister, who once ran for state controller calling himself "Honest McHonest," testified that he had no recollection of the bogus 1986 legislation pushed by undercover FBI agents even though the measure came before the Assembly committee he chaired.
NEWS
June 7, 1987
Albert Cortez, 26, swept a field of five candidates last week to win a seat on the board of the El Rancho Unified School District. He received 856 votes, 44% of the total. The second highest vote-getter was Cecilia Chavez, who received 554 votes for 28.5% of the total. Cortez is an administrative assistant for state Sen. Joseph Montoya and is a night student at Whittier College.
NEWS
August 4, 1989
State Sen. Joseph Montoya's trial on federal corruption charges will begin Dec. 4 in Sacramento, U.S. District Judge Milton Schwartz said. Montoya, 51, is accused of 10 counts of bribery, extortion and money-laundering stemming from an undercover FBI sting operation in the state Capitol. Scheduled to be tried with the El Monte Democrat is a former aide, Amiel Jaramillo, but Jaramillo's attorney has indicated that he may seek a separate trial.
NEWS
December 15, 1989 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Assemblyman Alister McAlister, testifying as a government expert in the trial of Sen. Joseph B. Montoya, acknowledged under cross-examination Thursday that he voted for a dummy FBI bill because he believed it might do some "small good." McAlister, who once ran for state controller calling himself "Honest McHonest," testified that he had no recollection of the bogus 1986 legislation pushed by undercover FBI agents even though the measure came before the Assembly committee he chaired.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
The Senate, reflecting concern over the extent of foreign investment in the state, voted Tuesday to require foreign businesses to disclose details of their operations in California. On a 22-6 vote, the Senate sent the bill by Sen. Joseph Montoya (D-Whittier) to the Assembly. One opponent, Sen. Ed Davis (R-Valencia), maintained that the proposal would encourage "bashing" of investors from Japan and other nations. But Montoya insisted: "We are not bashing anyone." In separate actions, the upper chamber also overwhelmingly approved legislation to toughen penalties against students who attack teachers but rejected a bill to require fast-food operations to label the type of oil used in cooking.
NEWS
June 19, 1989 | From United Press International
A Colorado businessman said Sunday he had to pay $20,000 to win passage of a bill authored by state Sen. Joseph Montoya (D-Whittier) and also to pay for lavish lunches and a hotel room for a Montoya aide and a "lady friend." Robin Kerns of Ft. Collins said he later ran out of money and refused to pay a $1,500 monthly retainer to Fred Shanbour, a lobbyist recommended by Montoya. As a result, he said, the law he wanted passed is now due to expire in the next two or three years. Kerns and his business partner, C.H. Carter, were flown to Sacramento at government expense and interviewed for more than three hours Friday by an FBI agent and federal prosecutor investigating Montoya and his relationship to various lobbyists.
NEWS
May 25, 1989
A bill by Sen. Joseph Montoya (D-Whittier) to regulate the placement of state parole offices has passed the Senate Judiciary Committee and will be heard by the Senate Appropriations Committee on June 5. The bill, which grew out of a controversy over location of parole offices in the San Gabriel Valley, would require the state Department of Corrections to develop guidelines for choosing sites and would prohibit placement within 500 yards of...
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Jurors began deliberations today in the corruption trial of state Sen. Joseph Montoya after listening to about 50 witnesses and sometimes emotional, last-minute arguments from attorneys. U.S. District Court Judge Milton Schwartz spent about an hour on the 28th day of the trial giving instructions to the panel of seven women and five men before sending them out to decide Montoya's fate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1990
It seems that I rarely read good news about Sheriff Brad Gates. Now we learn that Orange County has just paid $475,000 in a settlement against him, bringing to more than $1 million the money we've paid to compensate victims of his illegal and unethical police activities. Do we have to wait until he has as many charges against him as Sen. (Joseph) Montoya (convicted recently of political corruption) before the people of this county wake up and elect a man that is an asset and not a liability?
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