Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSen Richard Lugar
IN THE NEWS

Sen Richard Lugar

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
May 9, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro and Paul Richter, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Days before Christmas 2010, Congress was in a foul mood. Republicans had just swept the midterm elections, but Democrats were intent on finishing the year with a landmark lame-duck session on President Obama's top priorities. One measure, a revamped nuclear nonproliferation treaty with Russia, faced Republican opposition and an uncertain fate. Key GOP leaders opposed it. But Sen.Richard G. Lugarof Indiana, the party's elder statesman on foreign policy issues, was in favor.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
May 9, 2012 | By Michael Finnegan, Los Angeles Times
After more than 35 years in the Senate, Richard G. Lugarof Indiana was ousted Tuesday by a tea party challenger in a Republican primary that showed how hard it is for a veteran lawmaker known for his ability to compromise to win reelection in the current political environment. The 80-year-old senator, a leading voice for his party on foreign policy, was pummeled for weeks by Republican rival Richard Mourdock for his breaches with conservative orthodoxy. Among them: Lugar's support of citizenship for some illegal immigrants and his votes to confirm President Obama's Supreme Court nominees, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
May 9, 2012 | By Michael Finnegan, Los Angeles Times
After more than 35 years in the Senate, Richard G. Lugarof Indiana was ousted Tuesday by a tea party challenger in a Republican primary that showed how hard it is for a veteran lawmaker known for his ability to compromise to win reelection in the current political environment. The 80-year-old senator, a leading voice for his party on foreign policy, was pummeled for weeks by Republican rival Richard Mourdock for his breaches with conservative orthodoxy. Among them: Lugar's support of citizenship for some illegal immigrants and his votes to confirm President Obama's Supreme Court nominees, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan.
NATIONAL
May 9, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro and Paul Richter, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Days before Christmas 2010, Congress was in a foul mood. Republicans had just swept the midterm elections, but Democrats were intent on finishing the year with a landmark lame-duck session on President Obama's top priorities. One measure, a revamped nuclear nonproliferation treaty with Russia, faced Republican opposition and an uncertain fate. Key GOP leaders opposed it. But Sen.Richard G. Lugarof Indiana, the party's elder statesman on foreign policy issues, was in favor.
NEWS
March 14, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli and James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
One of the GOP's leading voices on foreign policy on Monday warned against the implementation of a no-fly zone over Libya, and said the Obama administration must first seek a congressional declaration of war. Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R-Ind.), the ranking member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, also said in a statement that the Arab League, which unanimously called for a no-fly zone, should pay for such an operation. Lugar's position puts him at odds not only with Democrats such as Sen. John F. Kerry, the Foreign Relations Committee chairman, but Republicans such as Sen. John McCain of Arizona and independent Sen. Joe Lieberman of Connecticut.
OPINION
January 28, 2007
SEN. RICHARD G. LUGAR (R-Ind.) was once considered one of the Senate's foremost foreign policy experts, while Sen. John W. Warner (R-Va.) was, well, not. Now, if you believe the Beltway buzz, their reputations have been reversed. Even if that reversal were justified -- and it isn't -- it shows that the president isn't the only politician in Washington whose career has been hobbled by Iraq.
NEWS
May 23, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a biting indictment of President Clinton's dealings with Congress on important international issues, Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R-Ind.) on Thursday accused him and his administration of a near-total failure to push key foreign policy initiatives. Lugar predicted that without a major improvement in lobbying efforts, Senate ratification of Clinton's premier foreign policy initiative--enlargement of NATO--would be in serious danger.
NEWS
November 5, 1995 | From Associated Press
Sen. Phil Gramm of Texas cruised to victory in the Maine Republican Party's straw poll Saturday, trouncing absent Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas and two other Senate colleagues who personally campaigned for votes. State party officials said Gramm's total of 602 votes gave him more than 42% of the ballots cast. Sen. Richard G. Lugar of Indiana was second with 303 votes, or 21%. Dole, whose partisans insisted that they had done little organizing in advance, got 144 votes, or 10%.
NATIONAL
May 5, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
FORT WAYNE, Ind. - The tea party upstart who is trying to dislodge one of the U.S. Senate's most respected Republicans is about to cry. Minutes into his stump speech at the annual Lincoln Day Dinner here, as hundreds of Republicans poke at chicken and mini-potatoes, Richard Mourdock chokes up, his voice cracking over the sound system, all the way to the bar at the back of the room. "Honestly, as I look at our nation's capital, I feel more frustrated with Republicans than Democrats," says Mourdock, the Indiana state treasurer.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Five former U.S. secretaries of State urged the Senate to confirm John R. Bolton as United Nations ambassador. Former Secretaries James A. Baker III, Lawrence Eagleburger, Alexander Haig, Henry Kissinger and George Shultz sent the letter to Sen. Richard Lugar (R-Ind.), who plans a hearing on the nomination Thursday.
NATIONAL
May 5, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
FORT WAYNE, Ind. - The tea party upstart who is trying to dislodge one of the U.S. Senate's most respected Republicans is about to cry. Minutes into his stump speech at the annual Lincoln Day Dinner here, as hundreds of Republicans poke at chicken and mini-potatoes, Richard Mourdock chokes up, his voice cracking over the sound system, all the way to the bar at the back of the room. "Honestly, as I look at our nation's capital, I feel more frustrated with Republicans than Democrats," says Mourdock, the Indiana state treasurer.
NEWS
March 14, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli and James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
One of the GOP's leading voices on foreign policy on Monday warned against the implementation of a no-fly zone over Libya, and said the Obama administration must first seek a congressional declaration of war. Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R-Ind.), the ranking member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, also said in a statement that the Arab League, which unanimously called for a no-fly zone, should pay for such an operation. Lugar's position puts him at odds not only with Democrats such as Sen. John F. Kerry, the Foreign Relations Committee chairman, but Republicans such as Sen. John McCain of Arizona and independent Sen. Joe Lieberman of Connecticut.
OPINION
January 28, 2007
SEN. RICHARD G. LUGAR (R-Ind.) was once considered one of the Senate's foremost foreign policy experts, while Sen. John W. Warner (R-Va.) was, well, not. Now, if you believe the Beltway buzz, their reputations have been reversed. Even if that reversal were justified -- and it isn't -- it shows that the president isn't the only politician in Washington whose career has been hobbled by Iraq.
NEWS
May 23, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a biting indictment of President Clinton's dealings with Congress on important international issues, Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R-Ind.) on Thursday accused him and his administration of a near-total failure to push key foreign policy initiatives. Lugar predicted that without a major improvement in lobbying efforts, Senate ratification of Clinton's premier foreign policy initiative--enlargement of NATO--would be in serious danger.
NEWS
November 5, 1995 | From Associated Press
Sen. Phil Gramm of Texas cruised to victory in the Maine Republican Party's straw poll Saturday, trouncing absent Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas and two other Senate colleagues who personally campaigned for votes. State party officials said Gramm's total of 602 votes gave him more than 42% of the ballots cast. Sen. Richard G. Lugar of Indiana was second with 303 votes, or 21%. Dole, whose partisans insisted that they had done little organizing in advance, got 144 votes, or 10%.
NEWS
June 28, 1985 | United Press International
Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R-Ind.), chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, will leave today for a 10-day trip to six Latin American countries, his office announced Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1989
When Ronald Reagan was caught selling arms to Iran he appeared on national television and informed the American public that his Administration was dealing with "moderates" in Iran who were going to be of some help to us. Today, after the Ayatollah has passed on, the consensus of opinion among newsmen and even Sen. Richard Lugar (R-Ind.), is that there are no moderates in Iran. What happened to those people who the Reagan group eagerly did business with? As days pass, Emperor Reagan's new clothes become more obvious.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|