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July 7, 2010 | Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III has postponed the appointment of a replacement for the late Sen. Robert C. Byrd until state officials clarify how soon a special election can be held, a move that leaves Senate Democrats short a potentially crucial vote at least until next week. Manchin said Wednesday that he would prefer to allow voters to choose someone to complete Byrd's unexpired term in an election this fall. Until the state attorney general determines whether he is empowered to call for such a vote, however, Manchin said he would not name a temporary replacement.
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NATIONAL
July 9, 2010 | Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
West Virginia's attorney general said in a legal opinion issued Thursday that Gov. Joe Manchin III had the authority to call a special election in November to fill the seat of the late Sen. Robert C. Byrd, clearing the way for Manchin to appoint a temporary replacement. The ruling by Atty. Gen. Darrell McGraw also enables Manchin, a Democrat, to declare his candidacy for the Senate seat. Byrd died June 28 and was the longest-serving member in the history of Congress. McGraw's finding was issued a day after Manchin requested a formal ruling on whether he could order a special election to fill the seat.
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NATIONAL
June 28, 2010 | By Richard Simon, Tribune Washington Bureau
Sen. Robert C. Byrd, the longest-serving member of Congress in history, was seriously ill in a Washington-area hospital, a spokesman said Sunday. The West Virginia Democrat, 92, fell ill late last week with what was believed to be heat exhaustion and severe dehydration stemming from hot weather. But other unspecified conditions developed and his condition is described as serious, his spokesman said. The hospital was not identified. Byrd has served in Congress for 57 years — six in the House and the rest in the Senate.
NATIONAL
July 7, 2010 | Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III has postponed the appointment of a replacement for the late Sen. Robert C. Byrd until state officials clarify how soon a special election can be held, a move that leaves Senate Democrats short a potentially crucial vote at least until next week. Manchin said Wednesday that he would prefer to allow voters to choose someone to complete Byrd's unexpired term in an election this fall. Until the state attorney general determines whether he is empowered to call for such a vote, however, Manchin said he would not name a temporary replacement.
NATIONAL
June 6, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. Robert C. Byrd was released from a Charleston hospital after treatment for a mild infection. The Democrat, 90, was admitted Monday night after he began feeling ill and lethargic and developed a fever. Byrd is the longest-serving U.S. senator in history.
NATIONAL
June 4, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. Robert C. Byrd, 90, will remain hospitalized for several more days for treatment of a mild infection, his office said. Byrd "is alert, talking with staff and in good spirits and looks forward to getting back to work as soon as possible," his spokesman said. Byrd (D-W.Va.), the longest-serving U.S. senator, was hospitalized Monday after feeling lethargic and developing a fever. He has been in the Senate for nearly 50 years.
NEWS
June 21, 1989
The Administration threatened that President Bush will veto a critically needed supplemental money bill if Congress includes $822 million for the war on drugs. In a statement on the bill, the Administration said Budget Director Richard G. Darman will recommend a veto of the $3.2-billion bill if the anti-drug money and two other less controversial provisions are not rejected. The statement was released by Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.), chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee.
NATIONAL
November 8, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Sen. Robert C. Byrd, the longest-serving senator in history, is stepping down from his post as chairman of the appropriations committee. The West Virginia Democrat, 90, has become increasingly frail; his decision didn't come as a surprise. Byrd, who was first elected to the Senate in 1958, has been chairman or top minority member of the panel for two decades. Before that, he was the Senate's Democratic leader for 12 years. He said it's time for new leadership on the committee, which has control over more than $1 trillion in federal agencies' budgets.
NATIONAL
July 9, 2010 | Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
West Virginia's attorney general said in a legal opinion issued Thursday that Gov. Joe Manchin III had the authority to call a special election in November to fill the seat of the late Sen. Robert C. Byrd, clearing the way for Manchin to appoint a temporary replacement. The ruling by Atty. Gen. Darrell McGraw also enables Manchin, a Democrat, to declare his candidacy for the Senate seat. Byrd died June 28 and was the longest-serving member in the history of Congress. McGraw's finding was issued a day after Manchin requested a formal ruling on whether he could order a special election to fill the seat.
NEWS
May 17, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The White House today voiced "grave concerns" over a Senate amendment placing new restrictions on the U.S.-Japanese FSX jet fighter project, claiming that it could erode presidential authority. Press secretary Marlin Fitzwater said President Bush told House Republicans that his Administration will work against the amendment, sponsored by Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.), when the measure gets to a House-Senate conference. Bush met with GOP members in the Capitol at mid-morning.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2010 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Tribune Washington Bureau
Sen. Robert C. Byrd was brought for a final time on Thursday to the place he made his passion and his platform for more than a half a century. The body of the West Virginia Democrat was laid in repose in the Senate chamber in a ritual not performed since 1959. The ceremony — part private wake, part public pomp — was befitting a man who spent 51 years in the Senate and dedicated much of that time to mastering its arcane rules and history. Byrd died Monday at the age of 92, after years of failing health.
NEWS
June 28, 2010 | By Richard Simon, Tribune Washington Bureau
West Virginia Sen. Robert Byrd, the longest-serving member of Congress in history, was seriously ill in a Washington-area hospital, a spokesman said Sunday. Byrd, 92, was hospitalized late last week with what was believed to be heat exhaustion and severe dehydration stemming from hot weather. But other unspecified conditions developed and his condition is now serious, his spokesman said. Byrd, a Democrat, has served in Congress for 57 years. A former Senate majority leader and Appropriations Committee chairman, he is legendary for sprinkling floor speeches with references to the Bible and Roman history, his mastery of the chamber's rules and traditions, and his skill in delivering pork-barrel projects to his state, where scores of things have been named after him. "We are truly hopeful that he gets well soon," West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III said in a statement, "because West Virginians need his leadership in Washington."
NATIONAL
November 8, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Sen. Robert C. Byrd, the longest-serving senator in history, is stepping down from his post as chairman of the appropriations committee. The West Virginia Democrat, 90, has become increasingly frail; his decision didn't come as a surprise. Byrd, who was first elected to the Senate in 1958, has been chairman or top minority member of the panel for two decades. Before that, he was the Senate's Democratic leader for 12 years. He said it's time for new leadership on the committee, which has control over more than $1 trillion in federal agencies' budgets.
NATIONAL
June 6, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. Robert C. Byrd was released from a Charleston hospital after treatment for a mild infection. The Democrat, 90, was admitted Monday night after he began feeling ill and lethargic and developed a fever. Byrd is the longest-serving U.S. senator in history.
NATIONAL
June 4, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. Robert C. Byrd, 90, will remain hospitalized for several more days for treatment of a mild infection, his office said. Byrd "is alert, talking with staff and in good spirits and looks forward to getting back to work as soon as possible," his spokesman said. Byrd (D-W.Va.), the longest-serving U.S. senator, was hospitalized Monday after feeling lethargic and developing a fever. He has been in the Senate for nearly 50 years.
NATIONAL
December 4, 2004 | Richard Simon And Emma Schwartz, Times Staff Writers
Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.), promoting his lifelong passion for the U.S. Constitution, has inserted into a massive federal spending bill a requirement that schools devote at least part of a day each year to teaching about the document. The provision would apply to all schools, elementary through college, that receive federal aid. Education groups worry that the provision could be the opening wedge in a campaign by Washington to influence what schools teach.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2010 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Tribune Washington Bureau
Sen. Robert C. Byrd was brought for a final time on Thursday to the place he made his passion and his platform for more than a half a century. The body of the West Virginia Democrat was laid in repose in the Senate chamber in a ritual not performed since 1959. The ceremony — part private wake, part public pomp — was befitting a man who spent 51 years in the Senate and dedicated much of that time to mastering its arcane rules and history. Byrd died Monday at the age of 92, after years of failing health.
NATIONAL
December 4, 2004 | Richard Simon And Emma Schwartz, Times Staff Writers
Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.), promoting his lifelong passion for the U.S. Constitution, has inserted into a massive federal spending bill a requirement that schools devote at least part of a day each year to teaching about the document. The provision would apply to all schools, elementary through college, that receive federal aid. Education groups worry that the provision could be the opening wedge in a campaign by Washington to influence what schools teach.
NEWS
June 21, 1989
The Administration threatened that President Bush will veto a critically needed supplemental money bill if Congress includes $822 million for the war on drugs. In a statement on the bill, the Administration said Budget Director Richard G. Darman will recommend a veto of the $3.2-billion bill if the anti-drug money and two other less controversial provisions are not rejected. The statement was released by Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.), chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee.
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