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Sen Seymour

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1991
Because John Seymour has been appointed to fill the vacated Senate chair by Gov. Pete Wilson, The Times has reviewed his past activities (Part A, May 26-27). Seymour has given unwavering and strong support to the higher education needs of Orange County folks. I know, because I was president of Cal State Fullerton from 1981 to 1990. Over those years I have asked his advice and sought his help in Sacramento with legislative matters on behalf of the university. Whether it was a budget item with reference to our new student residential complex, a new science building or an intricate government committee matter, he always came through with an aggressive and positive response.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a hilly section of this affluent town, William E. Cooper bought a 3,400-square-foot house in a gated community by raising money the same way he did in business. He got it from investors. Those who helped by lending him money were eventually paid back. But 8,000 investors are wondering if they will recoup $350 million they put into the labyrinth of companies under Cooper's First Diversified Financial Services in Irvine. Cooper's First Pension Corp.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1991
I feel that the article about Sen. John Seymour ("Seymour Real Estate Ties Illustrate Ethical Dilemma," May 27) was very slanted and painted an inaccurate picture of the man. As the legislative chairperson for Region 17 of the Assn. of California School Administrators in the mid-'80s, I had a chance to work with Sen. Seymour, then Assemblyman Seymour, on many occasions in Sacramento. Sen. Seymour was always on or head of one of the education committees, even though serving on these important committees did nothing to fill his political campaign coffer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1993 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A party was going on, but John Seymour wasn't there. Instead, the former U.S. senator from California sat in his home watching TV images of his erstwhile colleagues back in Washington flash by during a presidential address to Congress. There was a tug of nostalgia, a wistful moment--but no remorse. "I said to my wife, 'It's good in a lot of ways to be out of there,' " Seymour recalled. "It's a chapter of my life that's written and done."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1991
Regarding Sen. Seymour's decision-making process on the (Clarence) Thomas nomination: What a namby-pamby pandering to announce that he consulted that great political, psychological guru Bob Schuller! Please, senator, consult whom you please--astrologer, palm reader, tarot cards--but keep it to yourself. Your desperation to continue as a senator is showing. ANN R. BIEN, Anaheim
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1989
Thank you, Sen. Seymour! The majority of people in California appreciate your decision to support pro-choice and public funding for abortion. Decisions about abortion are always difficult. John Seymour has always been willing to listen in his attempt to understand both sides of this issue. I challenge other Orange County legislators to be as brave and to stop imposing their personal and religious beliefs on others! MICHELE KLEIN Newport Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1992
What nonsense for Sen. Seymour to charge Sen. Cranston with "election-year politics" for calling upon Seymour to help enact protection for California desert. Does Seymour not expect political help in his election campaign, both financial and otherwise, from the industries and people opposing the Cranston bill? Does Seymour really expect us to believe that his opposition to protecting the desert wildlife and environment does not take politics into account? Not surprisingly, Seymour once again has sided with environmental exploiters over environmental protection, so I won't side with him in November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1991
I appreciate the compliment from Dana Parsons ("Primary Offers Chance to End Dannemeyer's Career," Feb. 27) that, "There are no trick mirrors and trapdoors with Dannemeyer--what you see is what you get." Such a compliment paid to a politician should be grounds for support. Unfortunately, what Mr. Parsons sees he does not like. Equally unfortunate is the reason why: my view of homosexuality as public policy. And what of this view? In a government run by a handful of dreaded Dannemeyers, true privacy would be enshrined in these matters.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Republican Sen. John Seymour, mounting an election campaign under heavy fire from party conservatives angered at his moderate social positions, announced Saturday that he opposes a pending state gay rights bill that has inspired internal GOP warfare. Both opponents and supporters of Assembly Bill 101, which passed the Legislature earlier this month and is awaiting action by Gov. Pete Wilson, accused Seymour of bowing to pressure from conservatives who are attempting to kill the measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992 | KENNETH R. WEISS
U.S. Sen. John Seymour is scheduled to be the featured speaker at a small reception in Oxnard on Friday evening, sponsored by a Ventura County Republican group. The Lincoln Club, a political support group for county Republicans, has arranged for Seymour to meet with about 50 Republicans from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at The Tower Club, 300 Esplanade Drive. Reservations are required for the $15-per-person event and can be made by calling 527-7262.
NEWS
October 11, 1993 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A party was going on, but John Seymour wasn't there. Instead, the former U.S. senator from California sat in his home watching TV images of his erstwhile colleagues back in Washington flash by during a presidential address to Congress. There was a tug of nostalgia, a wistful moment--but no remorse. "I said to my wife, 'It's good in a lot of ways to be out of there,' " Seymour recalled. "It's a chapter of my life that's written and done."
NEWS
October 31, 1992 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Friday signed into law sweeping legislation that overhauls the distribution of federal water in California while providing dozens of major projects for 16 other western states. The decision came as a blow to California farming communities, Sen. John Seymour and Gov. Pete Wilson, who met with Bush on Friday on the presidential campaign trail in Nashville, Tenn., to urge a veto.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. John Seymour (R-Calif.) conceded defeat Wednesday in his effort to block passage of landmark changes in the Central Valley Project, setting up a Senate vote and likely approval of the controversial measure today. Seymour, Gov. Pete Wilson and the state's powerful agriculture interests, who oppose the water package, are counting on a veto by President Bush.
NEWS
October 2, 1992 | DAN MORAIN and RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Democrats Dianne Feinstein and Rep. Barbara Boxer, front-runners for California's two U.S. Senate seats, report much more income than at least one Republican opponent, and pay far more taxes, an analysis of their federal and state tax returns shows. Boxer's foe, Republican Bruce Herschensohn, was the only one of the four Senate candidates from the two major parties who refused to allow The Times to inspect his tax returns for the past five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1992
Your editorial on Sen. Seymour's misguided efforts to block the California Desert Protection Act was much needed. Californians, the great majority of whom support this environmentally crucial piece of legislation, need to know that their senator thinks that he can get away with catering to special interests at the expense of the people, the environment, and the economy, which would be improved by S-21 due to increased tourism. Californians should also know that, soon after blocking a vote on the California Desert Protection Act, Seymour attempted to attach to an appropriations bill an amendment that would have bypassed the Endangered Species Act to allow more timber harvesting in California.
OPINION
August 9, 1992
Election-year politics can make people do strange things. California's Republican Sen. John Seymour, an appointee who is running for election to a full term, is a case in point. On Wednesday, vowing to do "everything" he could to block a bill that would protect desert wilderness in the southeastern corner of California, Seymour moved to prevent the Senate Energy Committee from bringing the measure to a vote before the full Senate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1985 | KENNETH F. BUNTING and JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writers
Harry Denver Hunt, a self-styled crusader for "God's people," was charged in Santa Ana Monday with making a series of threatening and annoying telephone calls to the office of state Sen. John Seymour (R-Anaheim).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1992 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a campaign sweep Friday through Ventura County, U.S. Sen. John Seymour toured "gang hangouts" near Ventura Avenue on foot with law-enforcement officials to tout his proposed $100-million anti-gang bill. Even before Seymour's arrival, some tension was evident among waiting community leaders, who work daily to keep youths out of gangs in the Ventura Avenue area.
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | TRACY WILKINSON and BILL STALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California voters made history Tuesday when they nominated Democrats Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer to the U.S. Senate, the first time in more than 30 years that a woman in this state has been a major party nominee for the nation's highest legislative chamber. The two scored convincing victories over prominent and well-financed male opponents. Feinstein will face appointed Republican Sen. John Seymour in November. Boxer's foe was still not decided early today. In a bitterly fought Republican contest, conservative television commentator Bruce Herschensohn and moderate Palo Alto congressman Tom Campbell were in a virtual tie. In the other Republican race, Seymour coasted to victory over Orange County Rep. William Dannemeyer.
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