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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2009 | By Shane Goldmacher
It used to be a dream job -- making law in the nation's most populous state. But California voters aren't the only ones who've grown frustrated with the Legislature. Increasingly, lawmakers themselves are giving up on the statehouse. Some are dropping reelection bids. Others are leaving for what was once viewed as a step down: local government. And finding top-flight candidates to run for legislative seats has become a challenge. "It's not as much fun as it used to be," said Kevin Spillane, a GOP strategist who recruits Republican candidates for the state Assembly.
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OPINION
December 4, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Would you like a $5,000 raise this year? Certainly members of the Legislature would. The difference between them and the vast majority of Californians is that they are actually going to get one. And that's OK. The higher salaries are a result of a 1990 ballot measure that wisely stripped lawmakers of the power to set their own pay. Proposition 112 established the California Citizens Compensation Commission, which sets salaries for state elected officials,...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1989
With the Senate and Assembly of California having approved Sen. David Roberti's resolution for three days of prayer for victims of violent crime, church leaders have been placed in a curious position (Metro, April 8). On the one hand, they have no quarrel with widespread prayer. But are they not discomforted by its being designated by the governing body of the state? Have religious observances suddenly become the business of government legislators? What has happened to separation of church and state as guaranteed by the Constitution?
BUSINESS
November 13, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Low wages paid by the fast-food industry come with a high public cost for California taxpayers, academics and advocates for the working poor told state lawmakers. Workers at hamburger, pizza and other, mainly franchise, eateries are paid at near-minimum-wage levels, making them eligible for public assistance that totaled an average of $717 million a year in California from 2007 to 2011. The condition of low-wage fry cooks and sandwich makers was the focus of a joint hearing of the Senate and Assembly labor committees Wednesday.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2007 | Newsday
The multimillion-dollar windfall that New York used to receive from collect calls made from state prisons is history. The state Senate and Assembly have agreed on the Family Connections Bill, a measure that eliminates the 58% kickback that the state received from the cost of each collect call made by prisoners. It was a "tax" that netted the state more than $20 million a year until Gov. Eliot Spitzer ended the practice in January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1992
The governor continues to make every effort to block progress on the state budget, demanding his way or no way (Aug. 24). Sunday night, it only took Gov. Wilson eight minutes to veto an education funding bill passed by the Senate and Assembly. The bill cut education by more than $800 million--a true compromise and the most that education could take without causing great harm to the state's 5 million schoolchildren. But the governor still insists that education should take deeper cuts to the tune of $6 billion over the next four years even though there is no need to. Republican Sen. Frank Hill and Assembly Democrats have made real attempts to move the budget process forward by producing six different balanced budgets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1993
When we examine Gov. Pete Wilson's revised state budget plan ("Revised State Budget Includes Deficit Spending," May 21) and find it devoid of any efforts to address the funding crises facing the courts, we believe that it is the courts' responsibility to explain the harsh impact of the current trial court funding proposals adopted by the Senate and Assembly. The consequences of these funding proposals are unthinkable. The governor's budget was adopted by the Senate and recently revised downward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1995
The Times managed to cram two false and unfair charges against me into a single editorial, "Self-Interest Days in Sacramento" (Sept. 13). First, you criticize me for a "sneaky maneuver," the reallocation of 1% of the Legislature's operating budget. The facts are that I discussed with leaders of both parties very serious inequities in the allocation of funds between the Senate and Assembly in the weeks before the final budget document was drafted. No one disagreed with the case I made, but, not surprisingly, no Assembly leader was willing to face retribution from angry Assembly colleagues for supporting my proposal.
NEWS
September 9, 1987 | LEO C. WOLINSKY and JERRY GILLAM, Times Staff Writers
The mercury was edging into the 100s as James D. Garibaldi, the 81-year-old dean of Sacramento's resolute corps of lobbyists, set out across the Capitol lawn for an appointment that most of his colleagues could only dream about. A former legislator and Superior Court judge, best known around Sacramento as "the judge," Garibaldi represents the liquor industry, horse racing interests, big outdoor advertisers and other influential clients.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | Clipboard researched by Kathie Bozanich / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Thomas Penix / Los Angeles Times
The men and women listed below are Orange County's voice in Washington D.C. and Sacramento. District Office Holder U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES District 38 Robert K. Dornan District 39 William E. Dannemeyer District 40 C. Christopher Cox * District 42 Dana Rohrabacher * District 43 Ron Packard CALIFORNIA STATE SENATE District 31 William Campbell District 32 Ed Royce District 33 Cecil N.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO — A first-in-the-nation foreclosure-prevention measure is one step away from final passage in the California Legislature. A two-house conference committee Wednesday, on a partisan 4-1 vote, sent identical measures to the floors of the Assembly and Senate. Final votes are scheduled for Monday. The conference committee vote came at a particularly poignant time: the same day that the Central Valley city of Stockton became the largest municipality in the nation to declare bankruptcy, Assemblyman Mike Eng (D-Monterey Park)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2012 | By Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO -- Gov. Jerry Brown demanded Tuesday that lawmakers cut deeper into state spending, and welfare in particular, before they move a budget to his desk. As majority Democrats presented their spending plans in both the Assembly and Senate, the governor released a statement declaring, "We're not there yet, " and said the proposal being pushed through the Legislature is fiscally irresponsible. "The Legislature has agreed to some tough cuts, but the budget before the committees today is not structurally balanced and puts us into a hole in succeeding years," Brown's statement said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2012 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO — State Controller John Chiang did not have the authority to dock legislators' pay last summer after concluding that the budget they passed was not balanced, according to a tentative court ruling Tuesday. The Legislature meets its obligation to pass a budget when it sends the governor a bill that, "on its face," proposes spending that does not exceed revenue, wrote Sacramento County Superior Court Judge David I. Brown. He will consider finalizing the ruling at a hearing Wednesday.
OPINION
January 19, 2012
"Not every human problem deserves a law," Gov. Jerry Brown said when vetoing a bill last year, and while we may take issue with his choices of what to sign and what to reject, we believe he was definitely on to something. California is better off today because of only a handful of smart laws adopted each year; as for the rest — perhaps 2,000 in each two-year session of the Legislature — we could probably do just fine without them. The truckload of bills from lawmakers is in part a result of the state's development over time of an odd political structure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2010 | By Patrick McGreevy and Patrick McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
A plan to crack down on paparazzi who drive recklessly in pursuit of celebrities is moving through the Legislature despite heated opposition from media organizations as lawmakers approach next week's deadline for advancing bills to the governor's desk. As the paparazzi bill neared a floor vote Wednesday, the full Senate and Assembly gave approval to dozens of other measures. Proposals to help finance operation of a new private hospital to replace the closed Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Hospital, make public the names of businesses that receive state tax breaks and fine minors who ski or snowboard without a helmet all got final legislative approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2010 | By Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento The Democrats who control the Legislature have fired their opening salvo against Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's spending blueprint, which proposed eliminating California's welfare program and cutting deeply into other state services, by proposing that the state rely instead on billions of dollars in new taxes to balance the budget. The Assembly's Democrats detailed a plan Tuesday that would tax oil companies and borrow billions from the nickel-and-dime deposits that consumers make on recyclable bottles and cans.
OPINION
January 19, 2012
"Not every human problem deserves a law," Gov. Jerry Brown said when vetoing a bill last year, and while we may take issue with his choices of what to sign and what to reject, we believe he was definitely on to something. California is better off today because of only a handful of smart laws adopted each year; as for the rest — perhaps 2,000 in each two-year session of the Legislature — we could probably do just fine without them. The truckload of bills from lawmakers is in part a result of the state's development over time of an odd political structure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2009 | GEORGE SKELTON
California voters sent Sacramento a mixed and somewhat contradictory message Tuesday. But the politicians' response should be unequivocal. They should fix the budget themselves, right now, and not dither over any pain it inflicts. All those steamy summers of squabbling over unconstitutionally late spending plans without honestly making ends meet finally caught up with the policymakers when the electorate emphatically trashed their convoluted offering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2010 | By Shane Goldmacher
Democratic state senators pushed the first budget cuts of 2010 through a key committee Wednesday, slicing government payroll costs by 5% and cutting $811 million from the prisons' healthcare budget. The votes were the first on budget matters since Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger called a special session last month to address California's roughly $20-billion deficit. Lawmakers deferred decisions on how much to cut from California schools and social services -- the state's costliest programs -- until summer budget talks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2009 | By Shane Goldmacher
It used to be a dream job -- making law in the nation's most populous state. But California voters aren't the only ones who've grown frustrated with the Legislature. Increasingly, lawmakers themselves are giving up on the statehouse. Some are dropping reelection bids. Others are leaving for what was once viewed as a step down: local government. And finding top-flight candidates to run for legislative seats has become a challenge. "It's not as much fun as it used to be," said Kevin Spillane, a GOP strategist who recruits Republican candidates for the state Assembly.
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