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NEWS
December 4, 1996 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a friendly swap of political power, California Sen. Barbara Boxer will take over the Senate Appropriations Committee seat reserved for Democratic colleague Sen. Dianne Feinstein. The maneuver, announced Tuesday, gives Boxer an influential Senate position that should pay political dividends as she plots her reelection strategy to retain her seat two years from now. "It's a great day for California, and I am very pleased to take a seat on this powerful committee," Boxer said.
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NEWS
December 4, 1996 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a friendly swap of political power, California Sen. Barbara Boxer will take over the Senate Appropriations Committee seat reserved for Democratic colleague Sen. Dianne Feinstein. The maneuver, announced Tuesday, gives Boxer an influential Senate position that should pay political dividends as she plots her reelection strategy to retain her seat two years from now. "It's a great day for California, and I am very pleased to take a seat on this powerful committee," Boxer said.
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NEWS
January 9, 1992 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The very first thing you notice about the senior senator from West Virginia is that voice. There is no doubt about it: Robert C. Byrd has the best voice in Washington. It's a deep yet tremulous 74-year-old voice that seems to descend upon the listener from on high, as if Byrd is somewhere above you, uttering eternal truths that are immediately being hammered into granite.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The very first thing you notice about the senior senator from West Virginia is that voice. There is no doubt about it: Robert C. Byrd has the best voice in Washington. It's a deep yet tremulous 74-year-old voice that seems to descend upon the listener from on high, as if Byrd is somewhere above you, uttering eternal truths that are immediately being hammered into granite.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1988 | From Reuters
Treasury Secretary James A. Baker III on Tuesday predicted a further improvement in the stubborn U.S. trade deficit and said the White House has no interest in seeing the dollar fall further. Baker told the Senate Appropriations Committee that U.S. exporters were now competitive in world markets, thanks to the drop of more than 50% in the dollar's exchange rate against other major currencies in the past three years.
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