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NEWS
April 21, 1991 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few months ago, before Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.) and Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) split over whether to go to war in the Persian Gulf, Aspin sized up the two defense oracles' comparative political clout and hinted at their intense, though outwardly friendly, rivalry. "I'm the 400-pound gorilla" on defense policy, said Aspin, who is chairman of the House Armed Services Committee. But Nunn, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, "is the 800-pound gorilla," Aspin conceded.
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WORLD
April 23, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Sen. John McCain, on a visit to rebel-controlled eastern Libya on Friday, urged the United States and its allies to increase airstrikes and facilitate weapons deliveries to bolster the insurgent cause, a call for stepped-up intervention that clashes with the Obama administration's more cautious approach to the conflict. McCain, the ranking Republican on the Senate Armed Services Committee, urged official U.S. recognition of the opposition leadership here "as the legitimate voice of the Libyan people.
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NATIONAL
May 17, 2004 | Richard Simon and Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writers
As the White House struggles to get beyond the prisoner abuse scandal, it faces an unsettling fact: The Senate Armed Services Committee -- controlled by Republicans -- plans to keep the issue alive for weeks to come. That promises more headaches for the White House and once undreamed-of opportunities for Democrats on the committee, such as Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts and other critics of President Bush's handling of the war in Iraq.
NATIONAL
May 17, 2004 | Richard Simon and Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writers
As the White House struggles to get beyond the prisoner abuse scandal, it faces an unsettling fact: The Senate Armed Services Committee -- controlled by Republicans -- plans to keep the issue alive for weeks to come. That promises more headaches for the White House and once undreamed-of opportunities for Democrats on the committee, such as Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts and other critics of President Bush's handling of the war in Iraq.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Senate Armed Services Committee on Wednesday delayed indefinitely a vote on President Bush's nominee to head the nation's troubled nuclear weapons complex after learning that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is investigating charges that he lied to Congress. The committee's chairman, Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.), and the ranking Republican, Sen. John W. Warner of Virginia, recommended the delay after the NRC's inspector general told them that Victor Stello Jr.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two former chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff criticized President Bush's decision to deploy more troops to the Persian Gulf and told a congressional hearing Wednesday that the United States should not take military action against Iraq until economic sanctions have been given more time to work.
NEWS
December 5, 1997
On the eve of his 95th birthday, Sen. Strom Thurmond (R-S.C.) said Thursday that he will step down as chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee at the end of next year. "I think the time has come for me to turn the reins of the committee over to the next generation of leadership, and I have decided that this next year is the natural time for me to relinquish the chairmanship," Thurmond, the longest-serving senator and oldest member of Congress ever, said in a written statement.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The brouhaha over whether all Army soldiers should get to wear the black beret long reserved for the elite Rangers was taken up by the Senate Armed Services Committee chairman, who called for a review before the new uniform becomes official. "This was a decision made during the Clinton administration which I believe, in light of the outpouring of conscientious concern from both active and former soldiers, deserves a second look," Sen. John W. Warner (R-Va.) wrote to Defense Secretary Donald H.
NEWS
September 30, 1998 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republican senators Tuesday angrily accused the Joint Chiefs of Staff of overlooking a sharp erosion in military readiness because of a desire to support President Clinton's goal of limiting defense spending. In a sharp-edged confrontation, GOP members of the Senate Armed Services Committee charged that readiness had been falling long before the chiefs' recently declared a need for substantial increases in the defense budget. Such increases would reverse 14 years of falling defense budgets.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Senate panel backed a compromise proposal on the "Star Wars" missile defense program that speeds deployment of ground-based weapons and keeps alive "Brilliant Pebbles," space-based rockets designed to destroy missiles shortly after launching. While the compromise plan cleared the Senate Armed Services Committee by a vote of 16 to 4, opponents said the vote masked deep divisions on the program and vowed a floor fight to try to derail it. The Senate plan provides $4.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The brouhaha over whether all Army soldiers should get to wear the black beret long reserved for the elite Rangers was taken up by the Senate Armed Services Committee chairman, who called for a review before the new uniform becomes official. "This was a decision made during the Clinton administration which I believe, in light of the outpouring of conscientious concern from both active and former soldiers, deserves a second look," Sen. John W. Warner (R-Va.) wrote to Defense Secretary Donald H.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott asked the Air Force to reverse a decision to cancel contracts with Boeing Co. and TRW Inc. that were intended to demonstrate that it's feasible to build a system of low-orbit satellites capable of detecting and tracking ballistic missiles fired at the U.S. The Air Force announced Feb. 5 it had canceled the contracts with the nation's No. 2 and No. 10 defense contractors, because of steep cost overruns.
NEWS
September 30, 1998 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republican senators Tuesday angrily accused the Joint Chiefs of Staff of overlooking a sharp erosion in military readiness because of a desire to support President Clinton's goal of limiting defense spending. In a sharp-edged confrontation, GOP members of the Senate Armed Services Committee charged that readiness had been falling long before the chiefs' recently declared a need for substantial increases in the defense budget. Such increases would reverse 14 years of falling defense budgets.
NEWS
December 5, 1997
On the eve of his 95th birthday, Sen. Strom Thurmond (R-S.C.) said Thursday that he will step down as chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee at the end of next year. "I think the time has come for me to turn the reins of the committee over to the next generation of leadership, and I have decided that this next year is the natural time for me to relinquish the chairmanship," Thurmond, the longest-serving senator and oldest member of Congress ever, said in a written statement.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Senate panel backed a compromise proposal on the "Star Wars" missile defense program that speeds deployment of ground-based weapons and keeps alive "Brilliant Pebbles," space-based rockets designed to destroy missiles shortly after launching. While the compromise plan cleared the Senate Armed Services Committee by a vote of 16 to 4, opponents said the vote masked deep divisions on the program and vowed a floor fight to try to derail it. The Senate plan provides $4.
NEWS
June 19, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three of the four heads of the U.S. military services told lawmakers on Tuesday that they oppose making women eligible for combat. Despite growing sentiment for letting American servicewomen join men in battle in some situations, all but the Air Force's top general argued against modifying the prohibitions.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The 11 Democrats on the Senate Armed Services Committee said in a report Tuesday that John Tower has a record of excessive drinking and indiscreet behavior with women that disqualifies him from becoming President Bush's secretary of defense. Nine Republicans on the same committee, however, insisted that there was no credible evidence that Tower ever allowed alcohol to interfere with the performance of his duties and said he is "fully and ably qualified" to take over the Pentagon.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott asked the Air Force to reverse a decision to cancel contracts with Boeing Co. and TRW Inc. that were intended to demonstrate that it's feasible to build a system of low-orbit satellites capable of detecting and tracking ballistic missiles fired at the U.S. The Air Force announced Feb. 5 it had canceled the contracts with the nation's No. 2 and No. 10 defense contractors, because of steep cost overruns.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few months ago, before Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.) and Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) split over whether to go to war in the Persian Gulf, Aspin sized up the two defense oracles' comparative political clout and hinted at their intense, though outwardly friendly, rivalry. "I'm the 400-pound gorilla" on defense policy, said Aspin, who is chairman of the House Armed Services Committee. But Nunn, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, "is the 800-pound gorilla," Aspin conceded.
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