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Senate Ethics Committee

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NEWS
February 19, 1994 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court refused on Friday to keep Sen. Bob Packwood's diaries from the Senate Ethics Committee while he appeals the panel's subpoena. The order means the Oregon Republican's diaries could begin making their way to the committee as early as Tuesday. Packwood "has not satisfied the stringent standards required for a stay pending appeal," said a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. The order left intact a 15-day timetable set by U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2012 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO — The state's ethics agency is investigating whether state Sen. Mimi Walters (R-Laguna Niguel) violated conflict-of-interest laws when her office placed phone calls to California prison officials about the status of a financial claim her husband's company had filed. The inquiry was disclosed in a written notice to Walters' attorney by Gary Winuk, chief of enforcement for the state Fair Political Practices Commission. He wrote that his office "will be pursuing an investigation regarding whether or not Sen. Walters violated the Political Reform Act's conflict-of-interest prohibitions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1990
"A person who makes a contribution has a better chance to get access than someone who does not"--a quote from Sen. Cranston (in his deposition to the Senate Ethics Committee) as to why he intervened on behalf of Charles Keating with the bank regulators. This certainly says a lot about Cranston's view of the workings of democracy. JOHN CORCORAN Playa del Rey
NATIONAL
April 22, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli and Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Nevada Sen. John Ensign, facing an ethics investigation stemming from his affair with a campaign aide, will resign Friday, his office announced. The senator's decision was met with a collective sigh of relief — and little surprise — in his home state, where Ensign's scandals have dominated headlines for nearly two years. Ensign, a Republican, had announced in March that he would not seek a third term in 2012, saying he wanted to spare his family from an "exceptionally ugly" campaign.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Senate Panel Seeks More Keating Testimony: The Senate Ethics Committee has asked Charles H. Keating Jr. to testify about the "possible assistance of certain senators" in his attempt to sell Lincoln Savings & Loan, according to a memo obtained by The Times. The committee also asked in a Feb.
NEWS
July 18, 1989
The Senate Ethics Committee was formally asked to investigate Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato (R-N.Y.) for a "pattern of exploiting" his office to benefit campaign contributors and friends. The request for an investigation was made by Mark Green, a Democrat, who was decisively beaten by D'Amato in the 1986 senatorial election. Green said his complaint is based on news stories. In a statement, D'Amato said the request is "a blatant campaign document."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1991
The U.S. Constitution provides, in Article I, that "each House may . . . punish its Members for disorderly Behavior, and, with the Concurrence of two-thirds, expel a Member." But the failure of the Senate Ethics Committee in two recent cases to take appropriately aggressive action against senators who engaged in questionable ethical behavior raises a fundamental issue. Are members of the Senate Ethics Committee capable of judging their own colleagues in a way that reflects the public interest?
NEWS
September 21, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate Ethics Committee has cleared Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato (R-N.Y.) of wrongdoing for any special treatment he may have received from a brokerage firm that earned him a quick and hefty profit on a stock trade. In a letter made public by D'Amato, the committee said it "concluded that no improper conduct and no violation of law or Senate rule occurred." Victor Baird, the chief counsel of the panel, said no further action would be taken. The complaint was lodged in June by a watchdog group.
NEWS
February 15, 2001 | From Reuters
The Senate Ethics Committee has cleared New York Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of any violations of Senate rules in connection with her $8-million book deal with a New York publishing house. Committee counsel Victor Baird said the book contract did not violate Senate rules allowing terms of payment that fall within "usual and customary" business patterns.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2011 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Dogged by an extramarital affair, a Senate ethics investigation and lackluster fundraising, Nevada Sen. John Ensign announced Monday he would retire in 2012. The two-term Republican said he wanted to spare his family from an "exceptionally ugly" race that was sure to rehash Ensign's dalliance with his top aide's wife. "There are consequences to sin, and when you're in a leadership role, those consequences can affect a lot of other people," he said. Ensign spoke at the same Las Vegas courthouse where he apologized in 2009 for the affair with the wife of Doug Hampton.
NEWS
February 1, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON-- The Senate ethics committee has hired a prominent Washington attorney to investigate allegations against Sen. John Ensign, a sign that it is stepping up its probe into how the Nevada senator dealt with the fallout from his extramarital affair with a senior aide's wife. Carol Elder Bruce, a well-known Washington trial attorney and a former assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, has been named special counsel in the ethics investigation, committee Chairwoman Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2006 | Mary Curtius, Times Staff Writer
Two key senators begin their bipartisan push today for creating an office of public integrity, a proposal that would significantly alter the way Congress investigates itself. Under the measure sponsored by Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), chairwoman of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, and Sen. Joe Lieberman of Connecticut, the panel's ranking Democrat, the new office could initiate probes of House and Senate members suspected of ethics violations.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2004 | Judy Pasternak, Times Staff Writer
The top-ranking Democrat on the Senate Ethics Committee has requested a formal review of lobbying practices in the chamber to determine whether tighter restrictions are needed. "I believe a Senate-wide review of policies that relate to all current lobbying practices is in order and have conveyed that to the chairman of the Senate Ethics Committee," Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said in a statement first reported in Wednesday's edition of Roll Call, a Washington paper that focuses on Congress.
NEWS
February 15, 2001 | From Reuters
The Senate Ethics Committee has cleared New York Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of any violations of Senate rules in connection with her $8-million book deal with a New York publishing house. Committee counsel Victor Baird said the book contract did not violate Senate rules allowing terms of payment that fall within "usual and customary" business patterns.
NEWS
September 21, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate Ethics Committee has cleared Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato (R-N.Y.) of wrongdoing for any special treatment he may have received from a brokerage firm that earned him a quick and hefty profit on a stock trade. In a letter made public by D'Amato, the committee said it "concluded that no improper conduct and no violation of law or Senate rule occurred." Victor Baird, the chief counsel of the panel, said no further action would be taken. The complaint was lodged in June by a watchdog group.
NEWS
February 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Senate Ethics Committee said Thursday that it would begin a trial-like hearing on Sen. Dave Durenberger (R-Minn.) because of "substantial credible evidence" that he violated Senate rules and federal law. Most of the allegations concern a book promotion arrangement under which the senator made speeches and accepted fees to promote two books he wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1995
Re "Tearful Packwood Bows to Pressure, Says He'll Resign," Sept. 8: Some senators feel bad for Sen. Bob Packwood (R-Ore.), as if he is a victim. Packwood is not a victim. No one has victimized him. He has victimized women, for which he has no remorse. In fact he describes his behavior as simply kissing. This is gross understatement and misrepresentation of what he has done. If Packwood feels bad, it is for the power, prestige and privileges he has lost, not for abusing his position as a U.S. senator nor for sexually taking advantage of women.
OPINION
August 6, 1995 | Suzanne Garment, Suzanne Garment, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. She is the author of "Scandal: The Culture of Mistrust in American Politics" (Times Books)
It is time to memorialize the revealing footnote to history that emerged from the recent Senate fight over whether to hold public hearings in the sexual-harassment case involving Republican Sen. Bob Packwood of Oregon. The Senate ethics committee rejected public hearings. But Sen. Barbara Boxer, a Democrat, led a campaign to have the Senate order them anyway. Boxer did her work with maximum vigor and volume, claiming that any other course would constitute a betrayal of the women of America.
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