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NEWS
January 1, 1995 | CHRISTOPHER SULLIVAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Republicans are trumpeting themselves as the party of the new--the new majority, new ideas, new energy. And then there's Jesse Helms. To the senator from North Carolina, the Republican agenda--line item veto, tax cuts, school prayer, deregulation, the end of the welfare state--is old. Maybe not as old as the hills.
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WORLD
March 20, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- Members of Congress who were hit Thursday with sanctions by Russia celebrated their standing as a badge of honor, pledging to continue pressing for Ukraine from their spot on President Vladimir Putin's enemies list. "I guess this means my spring break in Siberia is off," quipped Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), who just returned from leading a group of lawmakers to Ukraine with Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.). House Speaker John A. Boehner's spokesman said the Ohio Republican was "proud to be included on the list of those willing to stand against Putin's aggression.
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WORLD
September 4, 2013 | By Paul Richter, Michael A. Memoli and Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - The Senate took a crucial step Wednesday toward authorizing a punitive strike on Syria but deep reluctance was evident in the House, where lawmakers questioned whether the U.S. was in danger of being drawn into another Middle East war. President Obama, who announced Saturday that he would seek legislative backing for military action in response to Syria's alleged use of chemical weapons, sought to raise the pressure on Congress as...
WORLD
March 3, 2014 | By Paul Richter and Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - Russia's military action in Crimea has strengthened support for economic aid to beleaguered Ukraine, yet the multibillion-dollar package under discussion in world capitals still must navigate a treacherous course. With Russian troops now essentially in control of Ukraine's Crimean peninsula, President Obama challenged lawmakers who have been demanding tough action to start with an aid package to help shore up the fledgling government in Kiev, the Ukrainian capital. Obama said Monday that he'd heard "a lot of talk from Congress about what should be done.
NEWS
June 28, 1985 | United Press International
Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R-Ind.), chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, will leave today for a 10-day trip to six Latin American countries, his office announced Thursday.
NEWS
October 2, 1985 | Associated Press
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted 12 to 1 on Tuesday to recommend the confirmation of Winston Lord as U.S. ambassador to China. Lord, 48, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, is a former diplomat who was also a key aide to Henry A. Kissinger during the Richard M. Nixon Administration.
NEWS
November 21, 1985
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee put off until Dec. 3 a vote on President Reagan's request for $54 million in counterterrorism aid to Central American governments. Reagan wants to provide $27 million to military forces in Central America, $26 million for police forces there, and $1 million to help cooperative individuals. But critics fear that some of the money would be used by forces suspected of human rights abuses.
NEWS
August 17, 1989
Citing the bombing over Scotland last years of Pan American World Airways Flight 103, Transportation Secretary Samuel K. Skinner urged the Senate to quickly ratify a 14-year-old treaty that would increase compensation for victims of international air accidents. In a letter to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Skinner said the bombing "serves to highlight the gross injustices that exist" because current treaty provisions limit compensation to $75,000.
WORLD
December 20, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Paul Richter
TEHRAN - Iranian lawmakers Friday threatened retaliation for a Senate bill that proposes tough new sanctions on Iran if the Islamic Republic fails to cooperate in upcoming negotiations aimed at curbing its nuclear program. Mehdi Moussavinejad, a senior member of the Iranian parliament's energy committee, said lawmakers were considering a measure that would hike Iran's uranium enrichment for the current top concentration of 20% to more than 60%, substantially closer to the 90% needed for nuclear weapons fuel.
WORLD
October 14, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - After a decade of stalemate, diplomats from Iran, the U.S. and five other nations are about to meet for talks that will provide the clearest evidence yet of whether recent signs of a thaw in relations presage an agreement over Tehran's nuclear ambitions. Iran wants assurances at the talks Tuesday and Wednesday in Geneva that if it plunges into serious negotiations, it might win international approval to enrich uranium. Although uranium enriched at low levels is used to fuel civilian power plants, many nations fear that Iran, despite denials, wants to enrich it to high levels for use in bombs.
OPINION
September 25, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Having a physical disability profoundly disconnects a person from the world in which the able-bodied live and move, and makes a challenge out of numerous mundane tasks. The Americans with Disabilities Act, which was passed more than two decades ago, prohibits many forms of discrimination against the disabled and mandates that they be provided with equal access to buildings, workplaces, programs, services and public accommodations. The federal law was the model for the United Nations treaty known as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which requires participating countries to provide equal access for the disabled.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON -- Recalling the efforts of her father to improve relations with Japan after World War II and his desire to be the first president to make a state visit there, Caroline Kennedy said Thursday there was no country where she would rather serve as ambassador. “I'm conscious of my responsibility to uphold the ideals that he represented: a deep commitment to public service, a more just America and a more peaceful world,” she told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee during her nomination hearing.
WORLD
September 8, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro and Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - The White House faces the strong possibility of a defeat over Syria that could seriously damage the president for the rest of his tenure, a peril the administration will battle this week as members of Congress return to work and open a decisive chapter of the Obama presidency. Administration efforts to seek support from lawmakers, including personal phone calls by the president, so far appear to have changed few minds. Nor has the support of top Republican and Democratic congressional leaders in both houses, who have lined up behind President Obama's plan to punish the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad for what U.S. officials say was a poison gas attack last month near Damascus that killed more than 1,400 people.
WORLD
September 4, 2013 | By Paul Richter, Michael A. Memoli and Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - The Senate took a crucial step Wednesday toward authorizing a punitive strike on Syria but deep reluctance was evident in the House, where lawmakers questioned whether the U.S. was in danger of being drawn into another Middle East war. President Obama, who announced Saturday that he would seek legislative backing for military action in response to Syria's alleged use of chemical weapons, sought to raise the pressure on Congress as...
WORLD
September 4, 2013 | By Paul Richter, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
WASHINGTON - - A divided Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted narrowly Wednesday to authorize a punitive U.S. strike against Syria, opening the way for a vote in the full Senate next week. The vote was 10 to 7, with Democrats and Republicans on each side. Committee Chairman Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) supported the measure, as did ranking member Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), who has repeatedly urged President Obama to do more to aid the Syrian opposition.
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