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NEWS
March 31, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Wednesday resoundingly endorsed the landmark U.S.-Soviet treaty outlawing ground-launched medium-range nuclear weapons and sent it to the Senate floor, where supporters expect to see it approved before the upcoming summit meeting between President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
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NATIONAL
January 16, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee recommended the confirmation of Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) as secretary of State. The vote was 16-1, with Sen. David Vitter (R-La.) opposed. Clinton still needs the approval of the full Senate to be President-elect Barack Obama's chief diplomat, but the committee vote was a clear sign that she is likely to be in place at the State Department by Obama's inauguration. Clinton, who in the Democratic presidential primaries said Obama was "naive" on foreign policy, indicated in her confirmation hearing that she supports the incoming president's intent to place diplomacy ahead of confrontation.
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NEWS
March 31, 2000 | By NORMAN KEMPSTER,
Summoned by one of the harshest critics of the United Nations, all 15 members of the Security Council trooped to Washington on Thursday to exchange views--and display pique--with members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), who invited the council members to the Capitol after scolding them on their own turf two months ago, urged panel members and the visiting diplomats to "agree to disagree agreeably." Mostly, they did that.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee announced Friday that it will hold hearings next week on the renomination of John R. Bolton as ambassador to the United Nations. A yearlong lobbying effort by Bolton has converted his most vocal opponent, Sen. George V. Voinovich (R-Ohio), into a key supporter.
NEWS
March 24, 2000 | From Reuters
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted Thursday to open the door to broader sales of U.S. food and medicine to Cuba, the target of 40 years of sanctions intended to topple communist leader Fidel Castro. Farm and business groups say the island nation, 90 miles from Florida, could be a natural market for U.S. exports. Anti-Castro sentiment in Congress scuttled two recent proposals to broaden food and medical trade with Cuba.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2005 | Sonni Efron and Mary Curtius, Times Staff Writers
After weeks of bruising discord, a divided Senate Foreign Relations Committee sent President Bush's choice of John R. Bolton as U.N. ambassador to the full Senate on Thursday without endorsing him. A Republican majority in the Senate is expected to confirm him as early as next week. The committee voted along party lines to withhold its recommendation and forward Bolton's nomination to the Senate after a surprise declaration by Sen. George V.
NATIONAL
April 19, 2004 | Ronald Brownstein
So far, the Bush administration has faced more tough questions about its plans in Iraq from the hosts of the Sunday morning television talk shows than from the 19 men and women of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Week after week, the hosts of the five Sunday shows have doggedly poked and prodded the administration's most senior figures to reveal their thinking. But no one elected Tim Russert and Bob Schieffer and Wolf Blitzer.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee announced Friday that it will hold hearings next week on the renomination of John R. Bolton as ambassador to the United Nations. A yearlong lobbying effort by Bolton has converted his most vocal opponent, Sen. George V. Voinovich (R-Ohio), into a key supporter.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sending a strong, dunning message to several Arab allies, the Senate voted 98 to 1 on Tuesday to ban arms sales to nations that fail to make good on multibillion-dollar pledges to defray costs incurred by the United States in the Persian Gulf War. The extraordinary prohibition was included in an Operation Desert Storm money bill that authorizes expenditures of $42.6 billion, most of which is supposed to be financed by allied contributions.
NEWS
January 21, 1987
The 1986 federal tax revision, featured by a great expansion of the tax base (the income subject to tax), along with expanded minimum tax provisions, gives Californians a unique opportunity to make an important and long-overdue revision of our state income tax system. As an experienced tax law specialist, I'd like to tell you how this could benefit Californians. This is a concept only; the economic experts can put in the numbers.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2005 | Sonni Efron and Mary Curtius, Times Staff Writers
After weeks of bruising discord, a divided Senate Foreign Relations Committee sent President Bush's choice of John R. Bolton as U.N. ambassador to the full Senate on Thursday without endorsing him. A Republican majority in the Senate is expected to confirm him as early as next week. The committee voted along party lines to withhold its recommendation and forward Bolton's nomination to the Senate after a surprise declaration by Sen. George V.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2005 | Mary Curtius and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
Democrats on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee warned Thursday that they may not be prepared to vote on John R. Bolton's nomination as U.N. ambassador next week, as they previously agreed to do. Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware, the committee's ranking Democrat, asked for additional documents as part of the panel's investigation of Bolton, and indicated that Democrats might try again to delay Thursday's vote if the information is withheld.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2004 | Mary Curtius, Times Staff Writer
For almost 20 years, as one of the most respected internationalists in Washington and a senior member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R-Ind.) was a man whose voice counted when it came to U.S. foreign policy. It was Lugar, after all, who pressured President Reagan to shift gears and back Corazon Aquino as the newly elected head of the Philippines in 1986.
NATIONAL
April 19, 2004 | Ronald Brownstein
So far, the Bush administration has faced more tough questions about its plans in Iraq from the hosts of the Sunday morning television talk shows than from the 19 men and women of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Week after week, the hosts of the five Sunday shows have doggedly poked and prodded the administration's most senior figures to reveal their thinking. But no one elected Tim Russert and Bob Schieffer and Wolf Blitzer.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | By NORMAN KEMPSTER,
Summoned by one of the harshest critics of the United Nations, all 15 members of the Security Council trooped to Washington on Thursday to exchange views--and display pique--with members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), who invited the council members to the Capitol after scolding them on their own turf two months ago, urged panel members and the visiting diplomats to "agree to disagree agreeably." Mostly, they did that.
NEWS
March 24, 2000 | From Reuters
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted Thursday to open the door to broader sales of U.S. food and medicine to Cuba, the target of 40 years of sanctions intended to topple communist leader Fidel Castro. Farm and business groups say the island nation, 90 miles from Florida, could be a natural market for U.S. exports. Anti-Castro sentiment in Congress scuttled two recent proposals to broaden food and medical trade with Cuba.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Tuesday endorsed the nomination of Edward J. Perkins, the U.S. ambassador to South Africa, to be director general of the U.S. Foreign Service. If approved by the full Senate, Perkins, 61, will become the highest-ranking black diplomat in the history of the State Department.
NEWS
August 3, 1991 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scandal-plagued Bank of Credit & Commerce International appears to have been involved in international arms-trafficking activity through a branch operation in Miami, Senate investigators said Friday. Documents made public by Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.), a member of a Foreign Relations subcommittee that is examining the bank's activities, show that BCCI sought to line up a third-country buyer for 22 missile-equipped French-made jets owned by the Argentine air force.
NEWS
January 8, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), the conservative gadfly on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has dismissed most of the panel's minority staff members in a dramatic shake-up aimed at reasserting his influence and at mollifying other Republican members upset by the staff's failure to consult with them. Committee sources said Tuesday that Helms, the committee's senior Republican, on Monday fired his staff director and eight other aides.
NEWS
August 3, 1991 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scandal-plagued Bank of Credit & Commerce International appears to have been involved in international arms-trafficking activity through a branch operation in Miami, Senate investigators said Friday. Documents made public by Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.), a member of a Foreign Relations subcommittee that is examining the bank's activities, show that BCCI sought to line up a third-country buyer for 22 missile-equipped French-made jets owned by the Argentine air force.
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