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NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Danielle Ryan
WASHINGTON - Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee debated the necessity of voter ID laws and early-voting restrictions Wednesday, with Democrats accusing Republicans of aiming to suppress the votes of African Americans and Latinos. The hearing followed incidents in which many voters, in Florida in particular, stood in line for hours to cast their ballots in November's presidential election, with some eventually giving up. Democrats on the panel of witnesses said some of the current voting policies around the country disproportionately affect African Americans, Latinos, seniors and the working poor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- With ethics scandals rocking the Capitol, Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday appointed as the new head of California's ethics watchdog agency a judge who has overseen the discipline of attorneys. Joann M. “Jodi” Remke, who is presiding judge of the State Bar Court, is Brown's choice to serve as chairwoman of the state Fair Political Practices Commission. The appointment fills a void created six months ago when Chairwoman Ann Ravel was appointed to the Federal Election Commission.
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NATIONAL
July 21, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
Democratic and Republican senators alike lamented the increasingly sharp partisan divide over the Constitution and the courts Tuesday, and then divided mostly along party lines to approve Elena Kagan, President Obama's nominee for the Supreme Court. The lone maverick was Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), who voted to confirm Kagan because, he said, she is smart, well-qualified and of good character. "But yes, she's liberal," he said, and paused. "Sort of expected that, actually."
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - California prevailed over Idaho on Monday in a long battle over the fate of a key judicial post, thanks largely to the Democrats' change last year to long-standing Senate filibuster rules. The Senate voted 56 to 43 to confirm John B. Owens for a seat on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, filling a seat that's been open since 2004 - the longest vacancy in the federal court system. Owens, who has practiced law for the Los Angeles firm of Munger, Tolles & Olson since 2012, was nominated by Obama in August.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1987
The rejection of Judge Robert Bork by the Senate Judiciary Committee is the best possible outcome for an ill-advised nomination. Bork stands for the proposition that the state takes primacy over the individual to the extent that it may invade rights that the framers considered inalienable. The state itself exists to ensure the continued well-being of the megalithic industries whose power perpetuates the military-industrial chokehold on this country. In more outspoken times, Bork's views would accurately be labeled as fascist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1991 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Judiciary Committee Tuesday night approved by a 6-4 vote a bill by Sen. Marian Bergeson that would give birth mothers less time to change their minds about giving their children up for independent adoption. Several Orange County couples who had attempted to adopt children only to have them taken away rallied behind the bill at the committee hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1991
Upon learning that the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday killed the nomination of U.S. District Judge Kenneth L. Ryskamp to the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals, Sen. Strom Thurmond (R-S.C.), a Ryskamp supporter noted, "It's just a pity." Wrong. The real pity is that Ryskamp has been sitting as a Miami district judge since his appointment by Ronald Reagan in 1986.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Journalists and bloggers who report news to the public will be protected from being forced to testify about their work under a media shield bill passed by a Senate committee Thursday. But the new legal protections will not extend to the controversial online website Wikileaks and others whose principal work involves disclosing "primary-source documents … without authorization. " Senate sponsors of the bill and a coalition of media groups that support it hailed Thursday's bipartisan Senate Judiciary Committee vote as a breakthrough.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2006 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr., President Bush's nominee to the Supreme Court, is expected to clear his first congressional hurdle today when the Senate Judiciary Committee votes to recommend his confirmation -- setting the stage for consideration in the full Senate as early as this week. Each vote is expected to divide largely along party lines.
NATIONAL
May 19, 2010 | David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan says she has $1.76 million in assets — mostly in bank accounts and retirement funds — and no debts or liabilities, according to her financial statement released Tuesday by the Senate Judiciary Committee. Kagan sent nearly 200 pages of material to the committee in response to its standard questionnaire. She included dozens of articles she wrote for the Princeton school newspaper, a detailed list of her speaking engagements and copies of academic articles she wrote over the last two decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
The new documentary about Anita Hill opens with a close-up of a telephone and a bizarre voice mail message: "Good morning, Anita Hill. It's Ginni Thomas, and I just wanted to reach across the air waves, and the years and ask you to consider something. I would love you to consider an apology sometime, and some full explanation of why you did what you did with my husband. So give it some thought, I certainly pray about this and hope one day you will help us understand why you did what you did. OK!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | Robin Abcarian
The new documentary about Anita Hill opens with a closeup of a telephone and a bizarre voice message: “Good morning, Anita Hill. It's Ginni Thomas, and I just wanted to reach across the air waves, and the years and ask you to consider something. I would love you to consider an apology sometime, and some full explanation of why you did what you did with my husband. So give it some thought, I certainly pray about this and hope one day you will help us understand why you did what you did. OK!
NATIONAL
February 6, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
On a straight party-line vote Thursday, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved civil rights lawyer Debo Adegbile's nomination to head the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division. Adegbile, a longtime voting-rights specialist for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, had drawn opposition, in particular from Philadelphia officials, because of his representation of Mumia Abu-Jamal, a convicted cop-killer there. The Fraternal Order of Police called the nomination “a thumb in the eye of our nation's law enforcement officers.” Other law enforcement groups, the police officer's widow and, most recently, Philadelphia Dist.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Judiciary Committee voted, 13-5, on Thursday to slash mandatory-minimum sentences for many nonviolent drug offenses and to make retroactive a 2010 law reducing the sentences for possession of crack cocaine. The bill had support from some prominent Republicans, notably Sen. Michael Lee of Utah and Ted Cruz of Texas, making it highly likely that it will clear the full Senate. But the committee's top Republican, Chuck Grassley of Iowa, warned sharply against the changes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) recommended Tuesday that Sen. Noreen Evans (D-Santa Rosa) be replaced as chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and observers say it appears part of a political squabble between the two over the race for Evans' district. Steinberg's recommendation that Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson (D-Santa Barbara) replace Evans as chairwoman will be considered Wednesday by the Senate Rules Committee, of which Steinberg is chairman, according to the agenda.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Three hours into his Senate speech-a-thon, Sen. Ted Cruz recalled that Sen. Rand Paul's filibuster criticizing U.S. drone policy was seen at first as "curious if not quixotic," but ultimately "transformed the debate. " Cruz, a Texas Republican, took control of the Senate floor Tuesday to herald his campaign to eliminate the money needed to implement President Obama's healthcare law. He hoped for a galvanizing moment similar to the one sparked by his Kentucky colleague in March.
NATIONAL
July 17, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON - The Voting Rights Act, the landmark 1965 legislation that protects against racially discriminatory voting practices, had long received overwhelming bipartisan support in Congress, including for the last renewal of its temporary provisions in 2006. But at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Wednesday, early discussions on how to respond to the Supreme Court's recent ruling striking down Section 4 of the law saw Democrats and Republicans mostly divided over the provision's utility and future.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two first-year women senators, Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Carol Moseley Braun (D-Ill.), were selected Wednesday to break the all-male stronghold on the Senate Judiciary Committee. More significant for California, Feinstein was granted her first choice for a seat on the highly coveted Committee on Appropriations. The panel controls the purse strings of the Senate and traditionally steers lucrative federal projects to the home states of its members.
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Journalists and bloggers who report news to the public will be protected from being forced to testify about their work under a media shield bill passed by a Senate committee Thursday. But the new legal protections will not extend to the controversial website WikiLeaks and others whose principal work involves disclosing “primary source documents … without authorization.” Senate sponsors of the bill and a coalition of media groups that support it hailed Thursday's bipartisan committee vote as a breakthrough.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Journalists and bloggers who report news to the public will be protected from being forced to testify about their work under a media shield bill passed by a Senate committee Thursday. But the new legal protections will not extend to the controversial online website Wikileaks and others whose principal work involves disclosing "primary-source documents … without authorization. " Senate sponsors of the bill and a coalition of media groups that support it hailed Thursday's bipartisan Senate Judiciary Committee vote as a breakthrough.
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