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NEWS
September 8, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Senate Judiciary Committee asked U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas to fill out its standard questionnaire, it got more than it bargained for--16,000 pages in all. Thomas supplied the panel with hundreds of speeches, newspaper articles, court opinions and documents from his years as a federal official during the Ronald Reagan Administration. For weeks, Senate staffers have been wading through the thick file, uncovering tidbits about Thomas, the man.
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NATIONAL
June 30, 2010 | James Oliphant
On her first day fielding questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee, Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan on Tuesday was accused of shading the truth about her role in a controversy over military recruiters at Harvard University. "The overall picture that she portrayed of the situation seems to me to be disconnected to the reality," Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama, the top Republican on the panel, said after an extended spat with Kagan. "I believe that's a serious matter." Sessions also said that she was not "rigorously accurate" and that he expected "intellectual honesty" from prospective justices.
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NEWS
October 14, 1991 | TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Jane Hoerchner, the college friend who testified Sunday in support of Anita Faye Hill, was a key corroborative witness earlier this year in a California sex harassment case that resulted in the presiding judge of the Norwalk Workers' Compensation Appeals Board stepping aside, state officials said.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2008 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday vigorously challenged FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III for the bureau's handling of the anthrax mailings investigation, signaling that they were not convinced the case had been solved. Both the panel's Democratic chairman and its most senior Republican said that, based on what evidence they had seen, the FBI had not proved that the mailings were perpetrated solely by Bruce E.
NEWS
October 11, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a highly charged confrontation to be played out today before a national television audience, a second woman who worked with Clarence Thomas is expected to join law professor Anita Faye Hill in telling the Senate Judiciary Committee that the Supreme Court nominee made sexual comments to her while they worked together at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
NATIONAL
April 20, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Excerpts from the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing where Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales testified: "The truth is that these firings haven't been explained, and there is mounting evidence of improper considerations and actions resulting in the dismissals. The dismissed U.S. attorneys have testified under oath they believe political influence resulted in their being replaced. If they're right, the mixing of partisan political goals into ... law enforcement is highly improper." Sen.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | RICH CONNELL and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Texas businessman John N. Doggett III, who strode into the spotlight of the Clarence Thomas controversy to allege that Anita Faye Hill "fantasized" about him, is a bright, self-assured professional, but also given to self-promotion and pomposity, those who know him said Monday. The 43-year-old management consultant and part-time professor from Austin, Tex.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The announcement that Anita Faye Hill had taken and passed a lie detector test on her allegations of sexual harassment against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas caused an uproar Sunday on the Senate Judiciary Committee, but experts were quick to point out that while the polygraph is considered a valuable investigative tool its accuracy can vary widely.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2008 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday vigorously challenged FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III for the bureau's handling of the anthrax mailings investigation, signaling that they were not convinced the case had been solved. Both the panel's Democratic chairman and its most senior Republican said that, based on what evidence they had seen, the FBI had not proved that the mailings were perpetrated solely by Bruce E.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, Democrats showed force but didn't pull the trigger. Republicans proved they could unify under pressure. But the real surprise behind the Senate's 58-42 vote to confirm John Ashcroft as attorney general Thursday was how both sides seemed ready to move on. There were few signs the battle would leave the long-term scars many had assumed would result from the controversial nomination.
NATIONAL
January 31, 2008 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Senate Democrats assailed Atty. Gen. Michael B. Mukasey on Wednesday for refusing to offer an opinion on the legality of waterboarding, an interrogation method that many consider a form of illegal torture. In often sharp exchanges, the lawmakers accused Mukasey of trying to protect the Bush administration, with one comparing him to a corporate lawyer trying to cover up the misdeeds of his client.
NATIONAL
April 20, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Excerpts from the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing where Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales testified: "The truth is that these firings haven't been explained, and there is mounting evidence of improper considerations and actions resulting in the dismissals. The dismissed U.S. attorneys have testified under oath they believe political influence resulted in their being replaced. If they're right, the mixing of partisan political goals into ... law enforcement is highly improper." Sen.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2007 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
When Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales faces angry Senate Democrats on Tuesday, he will acknowledge that he made a range of mistakes in the dismissals of eight U.S. attorneys last year and will apologize to them and their families, but he will insist that even though the White House was originally behind the terminations, none of the prosecutors were fired for political reasons.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2007 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, indicating they think there is more to learn about the firings of eight federal prosecutors last year, asked Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales on Monday to turn over additional documents on the terminations and threatened to issue subpoenas if the materials were not forthcoming. Specifically, the four senators want the internal rankings that the Justice Department made of all 93 U.S. attorneys over the years, as well as employment charts that Monica M.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2006 | Nicole Gaouette, Times Staff Writer
The opening bell sounded Thursday on the Senate's effort to overhaul immigration laws, but the committee taking the lead on the legislation appeared to be severely divided. Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee staked out sharply different positions on whether to create a guest-worker program, how to enforce border security and how to handle the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants in the country. "I have seen virtually no agreement on anything," Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2006 | Mary Curtius, Times Staff Writer
The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee detailed his plan for overhauling the nation's immigration laws Friday, setting the stage for a highly charged debate in the Senate this spring that could further split the GOP majority on an issue that has pitted President Bush against many congressional Republicans. In a draft bill that runs to more than 300 pages, Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Sen. John Ashcroft of Missouri won Senate confirmation Thursday as attorney general, 58 to 42, surviving a vitriolic six-week debate that triggered the largest opposition vote for the post in more than 75 years. The vote marked the first big political test for President Bush's fledgling administration, and Bush came out of it with a victory far narrower than many Republicans had predicted. Only eight Democrats joined the Senate's 50 Republicans to support Ashcroft.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The confirmation of John Ashcroft as attorney general is almost a done deal, but widespread opposition to the former Missouri senator and the grilling he has taken from Senate Democrats suggest that President Bush's judicial nominees also could encounter heavy fire. And the field of combat is far wider than potential Supreme Court openings.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2006 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr., President Bush's nominee to the Supreme Court, is expected to clear his first congressional hurdle today when the Senate Judiciary Committee votes to recommend his confirmation -- setting the stage for consideration in the full Senate as early as this week. Each vote is expected to divide largely along party lines.
NATIONAL
January 17, 2006 | From Associated Press
The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote next Tuesday on Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr.'s nomination to the Supreme Court, officials announced Monday night, and the full Senate will begin debate the following day. In a written statement, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) said he looked forward to a swift and "fair up-or-down vote" on Alito, President Bush's choice to succeed retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.
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