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Senate Judiciary Committee U S

NEWS
October 15, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D-Del.), the least painful part of the resumed Clarence Thomas hearings may have been the two root canals performed on him by his dentist in the middle of the night. The committee's televised sessions--scheduled after the furor that erupted over allegations that Thomas had sexually harassed a former aide--held the nation spellbound, fascinated with the sexually explicit testimony and emotionally explosive charges of sexism and racism.
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NEWS
October 15, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY and LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Anita Faye Hill was late coming home Monday, and the crowd began to mill, looking expectantly toward the door each time someone entered the ballroom of the student union of the University of Oklahoma. At 4:50 p.m., Hill strode into the room to the sound of 400 people applauding her. And for the first time in public since alleging in a press conference a week ago that Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her, she burst into a wide smile.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | Associated Press
Cable television's CNN, C-SPAN and Court TV networks plan live coverage of today's Senate's debate and vote on the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Clarence Thomas. The debate is scheduled to begin at 7:30 a.m. PDT. CBS, NBC and ABC said they would broadcast live coverage of the vote, which is scheduled for 3 p.m. PDT. CBS and ABC said they would monitor the preceding debate and air it live as events warrant. NBC said it would carry live debate coverage until 10 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
T hank you, Mr. Chairman.
NEWS
October 11, 1991 | Associated Press
The ABC, NBC and CBS television networks said Thursday they will air live coverage today of the 7 a.m. PDT start of Senate Judiciary Committee hearings on sexual harassment allegations against Clarence Thomas. CNN, PBS and C-SPAN earlier said they would provide gavel-to-gavel coverage of the hearings, as did cable's new Court TV network, which serves 5 million homes. ABC said it had not decided how long it will continue its live coverage.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Anita Faye Hill is grilled by Republican senators this week on her sexual harassment charges against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, she will be asked "whether she finds a dirty joke sexual harassment or merely off-color." She also will be asked how much wine she drank at a dinner where Thomas, who was then her boss, allegedly made offensive sexual remarks, an aide to Senate GOP Whip Alan K. Simpson of Wyoming said Wednesday.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most women members of Congress who have struggled to advance the causes of women, Wednesday was a day of jubilation: a fistful of angry female lawmakers had helped stop cold the scheduled vote on the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas over allegations of sexual harassment, and put the sensitive issue on the lips of nearly every worker in America.
NEWS
October 16, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For two days on the witness stand last week, Judge Clarence Thomas raged at those he said had sought to "destroy" him. Senate Democrats, liberal interest groups and the press, he declared, were conspiring to "put me and my family through . . . this kind of living hell."
NEWS
October 16, 1991 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Phyllis Schlafly, it was the best of times; for Kate Michelman, the worst. "The feminists and other liberals in this country have just gotten the backlash of public and Senate opinion that they deserve," Schlafly, president of a conservative women's group called Eagle Forum, declared Tuesday in hailing Senate confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas.
NEWS
October 16, 1991 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Feminist activists in Los Angeles on Tuesday vowed to turn their anger over the Senate's confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas into action they say will galvanize the women's movement across the country. "This has shown the need for more women in the Senate better than the entire feminist movement has been able to show in the last 25 years," said Katherine Spillar, national coordinator for the Fund for the Feminist Majority.
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