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February 24, 1992 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Life imitates art on TV from time to time, but perhaps never so closely as it does on tonight's "Murphy Brown" episode, in which Candice Bergen's character faces a U.S. Senate committee that is investigating a leaked confidential Senate report. This morning, a real-life broadcast reporter--National Public Radio's Nina Totenberg--was scheduled to face a Senate special counsel who really is investigating a leaked confidential Senate report.
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BUSINESS
February 6, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- The California lawmaker who authored the country's first ban on teenagers using tanning beds is complaining to the Federal Trade Commission about a new tanning group's safety claims. State Sen. Ted Lieu (D-Torrance) on Wednesday accused the newly organized American Suntanning Assn. of Jackson, Mich., of making similar safety claims as those made by a predecessor organization, the Indoor Tanning Assn. In Feb. 5 letter, Lieu asked the FTC to order the suntanning group to stop saying that indoor tanning has health benefits.
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NEWS
February 28, 1992 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a candidate languishing at the bottom of the polls, Mel Levine does not act like an underdog. Well-bred, Ivy League-educated and rich, Levine exudes the confidence of a man who feels destined for political success--despite being a relative unknown. With nearly $4 million in the bank, the congressman from Santa Monica has one of the largest war chests of any Senate hopeful in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian and Michael A. Memoli, Los Angeles Times
When Daniel K. Inouye was 17, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. An aspiring surgeon, he spent much of the next week helping care for the wounded at an elementary school in his native Honolulu. He wanted to enlist immediately but couldn't. Japanese Americans were classified as "enemy aliens. " Two years later, once restrictions were lifted in 1943, he joined the Army's 442nd Regimental Combat Team, whose motto was "Go for broke. " PHOTOS:  Sen. Daniel Inouye of Hawaii The Japanese American soldiers became the most decorated unit in U.S. history.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | Associated Press
With a final burst of partisan bickering, the Senate on Tuesday approved what likely will be the last federal judges of the Clinton era. Unanimously approved by the Republican-controlled Senate were U.S. District Judge Mary Murguia, the first Latina on the federal bench in Arizona; U.S. District Judges Susan Bolton and James A. Teilborg, also from Arizona; and U.S. District Judge Michael J. Reagan of Illinois.
NEWS
November 21, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Saturday approved the North American Free Trade Agreement, ending with little flourish a national debate that a week ago had threatened to throw out the pact entirely and complicate Clinton Administration plans for expanded trade agreements with other parts of the world. The vote was 61 to 38. As was the case earlier in the House, Republicans supplied the most support, accounting for 34 of the favorable votes to 27 from the Democrats.
NATIONAL
December 9, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Mike Huckabee once advocated isolating AIDS patients from the general public, opposed increased federal funding in the search for a cure and said homosexuality could "pose a dangerous public health risk." As a candidate for a U.S. Senate seat in 1992, Huckabee answered 229 questions submitted to him by the Associated Press. Besides a quarantine, Huckabee suggested that Hollywood celebrities fund AIDS research from their own pockets, rather than relying on federal health agencies.
NEWS
April 4, 2001 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Dick Cheney cast his first tie-breaking vote in the Senate on Tuesday, rescuing President Bush's budget plan from a Democratic effort to scale back the administration's $1.6-trillion tax cut proposal in order to increase funding for a new Medicare prescription drug benefit. Cheney cast his vote during debate on a budget resolution that includes the outlines of Bush's fiscal policy, including his tax cut plan.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Firestone admitted Tuesday for the first time that it had produced defective tires, and that their design, along with possible quality control problems at one of its plants, appear to be factors in the catastrophic tread failures. "We made some bad tires, and we take full responsibility for them," John Lampe, executive vice president of Bridgestone/Firestone Inc., told a Senate Commerce Committee hearing chaired by John McCain (R-Ariz).
NEWS
April 30, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
As the Internal Revenue Service has expanded its role in the federal war on drugs, it has begun subjecting ordinary American taxpayers to the same heavy-handed enforcement techniques used on drug lords and money launderers, a Senate committee was told. Several taxpayers described how they became the targets of raids by dozens of armed IRS agents--searches that ultimately failed to result in prosecutions for tax fraud but did manage to financially devastate the taxpayers.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2012 | By Ronald D. White
The six senators representing the West Coast states of California, Oregon and Washington are sending a letter to U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. today, calling for an investigation into possible manipulation of the gasoline market by refineries that serve the region. In the letter the senators say an investigation is needed to determine whether false or misleading information was used to create a perception of a fuel supply shortage. That might have helped boost fuel prices, the senators say. In California, the price of a gallon of regular gasoline hit a new record of $4.671 a gallon last month.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2010 | James Oliphant
The Senate confirmed Elena Kagan as the 112th justice of the Supreme Court on Thursday, creating a historic bloc of three liberal women likely to vote together much of the time. The 63-37 vote suggested that the bitter partisan divide that has plagued legislative efforts on Capitol Hill is increasingly infecting the high court nomination process. Kagan, the daughter of a tenants' lawyer and a teacher, who was raised in New York's Upper West Side, worked in the Clinton White House and headed the faculty at Harvard Law School before joining the Obama administration as its advocate before the Supreme Court.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2009 | Associated Press
Maneuvering to improve prospects for sweeping healthcare legislation, Senate Democrats hope first to win quick approval for a bill that grants doctors a $247-billion increase in Medicare fees over a decade but raises federal deficits in the process, officials said Wednesday. By creating a two-bill approach, Democrats can contend that the more comprehensive healthcare measure meets President Obama's conditions -- that it will neither add to deficits nor exceed $900 billion in costs over 10 years.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2009 | Rick Pearson and Janet Hook
Sen. Roland Burris tried Sunday to quell new questions about his controversial appointment to the Senate, insisting he shouldn't be blamed for only recently detailing his conversations about the job with five associates of disgraced former Illinois Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich. The Chicago Democrat said he didn't provide a full explanation because nobody pressed the point during his sworn testimony last month to Illinois House lawmakers who impeached Blagojevich.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2009 | Jill Zuckman
Sen. Roland Burris was moving fast through the Capitol. No matter that he was going in the wrong direction, headed toward the House when he thought he was going to his Senate office. His pace was brisk, his smile broad. He was having fun in his new job as the junior senator from Illinois. Tourists, staffers, Capitol police officers, custodians and even other members of Congress all want to meet the Democrat, shake his hand and congratulate him on his arrival in Washington.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2009 | Peter Nicholas
Sen. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.) is under consideration for the Commerce secretary post in President Obama's Cabinet, raising the prospect that Democrats could gain a filibuster-proof majority of 60 seats in the Senate, according to two officials familiar with the selection process. Gregg, who faces reelection in 2010, is one of several people under consideration for the remaining Cabinet post for which Obama has no nominee. New Mexico Gov.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a ruling that appears to cripple a controversial inquiry, the Senate refused Wednesday to compel reporters to testify or to divulge their telephone records to help investigators discover who disclosed confidential information during the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearing and the "Keating Five" ethics case. Sen. Wendell H. Ford (D-Ky.), chairman of the Senate Rules Committee, and Sen.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a murderous campaign, Wo Hop To, a Hong Kong-based "triad"--a centuries-old criminal society--has taken command of burgeoning and volatile Asian organized crime in the San Francisco Bay Area. In contrast, Asian syndicate crime in Southern California appears to be "in a state of turmoil," with no one organization dominant, Senate investigators have concluded.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2009 | Jill Zuckman and Rick Pearson
Roland Burris will probably replace Barack Obama in the U.S. Senate this week once the Senate's legal counsel completes a review, Assistant Majority Leader Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.) said Sunday. The legal counsel is to evaluate additional paperwork today on Burris' appointment by impeached Illinois Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich, Durbin said. Burris, 71, was appointed by Blagojevich three weeks after the governor's arrest on federal corruption charges, including that he tried to sell the Senate seat.
WORLD
November 28, 2008 | associated press
The upper chamber of the Czech Parliament on Thursday approved a deal with Washington to accept a U.S. missile defense installation. The deal still needs the approval of the lower chamber, where the vote is expected to be close because the governing coalition has too few seats to guarantee passage. The vote there is not expected before the end of the year.
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