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WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
NASA released the first satellite images of post-earthquake and -tsunami flooding in northeastern Japan on Saturday. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured contrasting views of Japan's Sendai region at 10:30 a.m. Saturday and Feb. 26. Water appears black or dark blue and a thin, green line outlines the shore, which is above water, presumably preventing the floodwater from returning to sea. The "flood" label shows how far inland floodwaters extended.
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SPORTS
February 14, 2014 | By Philip Hersh
SOCHI, Russia - About 15 months ago, when the Grand Prix Final was a test event for Sochi's new Iceberg Skating Palace, Brian Orser and the young Japanese figure skater he had been coaching for only a few months, Yuzuru Hanyu, went for a walk along the Black Sea. "We started talking about the Sochi Games, and he just blurted out, 'I want to win that Olympics, and I want to win the next one,' " Orser recalled. When Hanyu accomplished the first Friday, he treated what some would be celebrating as the achievement of a lifetime with a maturity, humility and sensitivity that belied his 19 years.
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TRAVEL
June 9, 1991
Perhaps inflation has affected the numbering of most scenic spots in Japan ("Land of the Paper Birds: A Journey Through Beautiful, Baffling Japan," April 28), but I was taught years ago that the traditional most scenic spots in Japan are three in number: Miyajima near Hiroshima; Matsushima near Sendai, and Amanohashidate on the Sea of Japan. In his article, Simon Hogart said that there are six. NAOMI KASHIWABARA San Diego
OPINION
April 12, 2011 | By Braven Smillie
I recently returned to my home here in suburban Sendai, Japan, having fled with my family soon after the earthquake and tsunami. Everything changed for this region on that afternoon of March 11. People lost their lives and their homes, and that should not be minimized. But what impressed me most on coming back alone to pick up the pieces was how few homes were destroyed, and how rapidly life here is returning to normal. Three weeks ago, kilometer-long lines of desperate motorists had blocked roads near gas stations, nearly preventing us from driving out. Now the lines are just a dozen cars deep, and moving.
SPORTS
February 14, 2014 | By Philip Hersh
SOCHI, Russia - About 15 months ago, when the Grand Prix Final was a test event for Sochi's new Iceberg Skating Palace, Brian Orser and the young Japanese figure skater he had been coaching for only a few months, Yuzuru Hanyu, went for a walk along the Black Sea. "We started talking about the Sochi Games, and he just blurted out, 'I want to win that Olympics, and I want to win the next one,' " Orser recalled. When Hanyu accomplished the first Friday, he treated what some would be celebrating as the achievement of a lifetime with a maturity, humility and sensitivity that belied his 19 years.
WORLD
March 14, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Toshio Otomo, 69, walked unsteadily over piles of rubble on hesitant legs, through caked mud, around a broken wall, in hopes of finding her home of 30 years. The home in which her two children were raised. The home whose garden held her beloved husband's grave. The home that contained so many memories, photographs and other keepsakes. Otomo was there along with her children and granddaughter, who had reached the spot, several miles south of Sendai, first. But in yet another indignity, the powerful force of nature that irreparably altered their lives also undermined their hopes for closure: Amid the devastation, they were left struggling to figure out just where their house actually stood.
WORLD
March 19, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Kazuhisa Takeuchi was taking advantage of a rare moment of calm between the afternoon and evening shifts at his Sendai dialysis clinic, chatting on the telephone with a colleague about a patient, when he felt himself lifted from his chair by a force immediately recognizable to anybody who grew up in this part of Japan. "Earthquake, bye," the 55-year-old doctor said, slamming down the receiver. When the unearthly shaking had ended, everything in his office was on the floor ?
BUSINESS
March 21, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S.-Japan dispute over air service rights is heating up as Tokyo seeks changes in what it views as an unfair 1952 agreement and American carriers try to expand Pacific Rim services under the old rules. The latest point of friction comes from a Japan Airlines request to inaugurate a route between the northern city of Sendai and Honolulu beginning last Thursday. The U.S.
WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Emergency responders have streamed into Japan to aid rescue efforts after the historic magnitude 8.9 earthquake and associated tsunami. Two teams from Doctors Without Borders arrived by helicopter in Japan's Miyagi prefecture Saturday and traveled to the hard-hit northern city of Sendai. The teams include medical and logistical staff such as Dr. Nobuko Kurosaki, a pediatric surgeon and president of the group's Japan division. They have been working in coordination with a Japanese Disaster Medical Assistance Team in an evacuation center in Sendai, where those displaced by flooding and quake damage have been receiving medical care.
OPINION
April 12, 2011 | By Braven Smillie
I recently returned to my home here in suburban Sendai, Japan, having fled with my family soon after the earthquake and tsunami. Everything changed for this region on that afternoon of March 11. People lost their lives and their homes, and that should not be minimized. But what impressed me most on coming back alone to pick up the pieces was how few homes were destroyed, and how rapidly life here is returning to normal. Three weeks ago, kilometer-long lines of desperate motorists had blocked roads near gas stations, nearly preventing us from driving out. Now the lines are just a dozen cars deep, and moving.
SPORTS
April 9, 2011 | By Jeff Shain and Teddy Greenstein
Reporting from Augusta, Ga. When Japan's Hideki Matsuyama saw how his college campus had been wrecked by last month's earthquake and tsunami, he strongly considered sending the Masters a regretful withdrawal. Eventually, the 19-year-old Asian Amateur champion decided to play. Now he'll be going home with some prizes. As the only amateur to survive the Masters cut, Matsuyama already has locked up the silver cup given to the tournament's low amateur. Saturday, he underscored the achievement with a four-under-par 68 that was one shot off the day's best.
WORLD
March 19, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Kazuhisa Takeuchi was taking advantage of a rare moment of calm between the afternoon and evening shifts at his Sendai dialysis clinic, chatting on the telephone with a colleague about a patient, when he felt himself lifted from his chair by a force immediately recognizable to anybody who grew up in this part of Japan. "Earthquake, bye," the 55-year-old doctor said, slamming down the receiver. When the unearthly shaking had ended, everything in his office was on the floor ?
WORLD
March 14, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Toshio Otomo, 69, walked unsteadily over piles of rubble on hesitant legs, through caked mud, around a broken wall, in hopes of finding her home of 30 years. The home in which her two children were raised. The home whose garden held her beloved husband's grave. The home that contained so many memories, photographs and other keepsakes. Otomo was there along with her children and granddaughter, who had reached the spot, several miles south of Sendai, first. But in yet another indignity, the powerful force of nature that irreparably altered their lives also undermined their hopes for closure: Amid the devastation, they were left struggling to figure out just where their house actually stood.
WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
NASA released the first satellite images of post-earthquake and -tsunami flooding in northeastern Japan on Saturday. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured contrasting views of Japan's Sendai region at 10:30 a.m. Saturday and Feb. 26. Water appears black or dark blue and a thin, green line outlines the shore, which is above water, presumably preventing the floodwater from returning to sea. The "flood" label shows how far inland floodwaters extended.
WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Emergency responders have streamed into Japan to aid rescue efforts after the historic magnitude 8.9 earthquake and associated tsunami. Two teams from Doctors Without Borders arrived by helicopter in Japan's Miyagi prefecture Saturday and traveled to the hard-hit northern city of Sendai. The teams include medical and logistical staff such as Dr. Nobuko Kurosaki, a pediatric surgeon and president of the group's Japan division. They have been working in coordination with a Japanese Disaster Medical Assistance Team in an evacuation center in Sendai, where those displaced by flooding and quake damage have been receiving medical care.
NEWS
March 11, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Japan struggled on Saturday to recover from its worst earthquake, which unleashed enough energy to generate a tsunami that threatened several countries along the Pacific Rim, including the United States where parts of California and the rest of the West Coast struggled to deal with rising tides. Japan struggled on Saturday to recover from its worst earthquake, which unleashed enough energy to generate a tsunami that threatened several countries along the Pacific Rim, including the United States where parts of California and the rest of the West Coast struggled to deal with rising tides.
NEWS
March 11, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Japan struggled on Saturday to recover from its worst earthquake, which unleashed enough energy to generate a tsunami that threatened several countries along the Pacific Rim, including the United States where parts of California and the rest of the West Coast struggled to deal with rising tides. Japan struggled on Saturday to recover from its worst earthquake, which unleashed enough energy to generate a tsunami that threatened several countries along the Pacific Rim, including the United States where parts of California and the rest of the West Coast struggled to deal with rising tides.
WORLD
March 11, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, David Pierson and Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds are dead after the worst earthquake in generations struck off the northeast coast of Japan on Friday, setting off a devastating tsunami that swallowed swaths of coastal territory and fanned out across the Pacific Ocean, threatening everything in its path. The 8.9-magnitude earthquake -- the world's fifth-largest since 1900 and the biggest in Japan in 140 years -- struck at 2:46 p.m. local time, shaking buildings violently in Tokyo for several minutes and sending millions fleeing for higher ground.
WORLD
March 11, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, David Pierson and Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds are dead after the worst earthquake in generations struck off the northeast coast of Japan on Friday, setting off a devastating tsunami that swallowed swaths of coastal territory and fanned out across the Pacific Ocean, threatening everything in its path. The 8.9-magnitude earthquake -- the world's fifth-largest since 1900 and the biggest in Japan in 140 years -- struck at 2:46 p.m. local time, shaking buildings violently in Tokyo for several minutes and sending millions fleeing for higher ground.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S.-Japan dispute over air service rights is heating up as Tokyo seeks changes in what it views as an unfair 1952 agreement and American carriers try to expand Pacific Rim services under the old rules. The latest point of friction comes from a Japan Airlines request to inaugurate a route between the northern city of Sendai and Honolulu beginning last Thursday. The U.S.
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