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Sendero Luminoso Organization

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NEWS
September 30, 1991 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bank of Credit & Commerce International handled millions of dollars in illegal arms transactions for Palestinian terrorist Abu Nidal in an effort to persuade its wealthy Mideast backers that the bank was staunchly pro-Arab, according to a former high-ranking bank official.
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WORLD
February 21, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Peruvian police killed a Shining Path leader during a weekend raid on a rebel stronghold in the country's central jungle. Hector Aponte, known as Comrade Clay, headed the Maoist group's rebel operations in the remote Alto Huallaga region and was killed Sunday in a police assault that lasted several hours, the interior minister said. The raid followed an attack on police last week in Alto Huallaga that killed two officers.
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NEWS
January 29, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shooting candidates and setting off bombs, Sendero Luminoso guerrillas have carried out a bloody campaign aimed at disrupting municipal elections today and showing that the Maoist group is still fearsomely effective. A powerful car bomb exploded Thursday outside the Peruvian headquarters of IBM, injuring several people, and terrorists assassinated a candidate for mayor of the important Lima district of Villa El Salvador. A dozen other mayoral candidates have been killed since late December.
WORLD
September 3, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Peru's anti-terrorism court sentenced four Shining Path rebels to prison for a 2002 car bomb near the U.S. Embassy in Lima that killed 10, a judge said. The rebels, a man and three women, planted the bomb in a taxi across the street from the embassy days before a visit by President Bush. The man was "found guilty of terrorism and was sentenced to 30 years in prison. The others received 20 years for their terrorist affiliation," said Pablo Talavera, president of the anti-terrorism court.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By disrupting this nation with devastating terror and violence, a former philosophy professor known as "Chairman Gonzalo" helped set the stage for this week's civilian-military coup. Chairman Gonzalo is Abimael Guzman. He is the legendary creator and guiding light of Sendero Luminoso (Shining Path), a guerrilla army unmatched by any other in Latin America for ruthless zeal.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1992 | From Associated Press
Gone are the days when an attractive receptionist greeted you at a business in Lima. Today you're met by a gun-toting security guard in a bullet-proof vest who searches you for explosives. Metal bars cover grocery store windows, and barricades are set in front of banks. Businessmen train to handle firearms and employ 24-hour bodyguards to protect against the kidnapers, robbers and terrorist violence rife in Peru.
WORLD
September 3, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Peru's anti-terrorism court sentenced four Shining Path rebels to prison for a 2002 car bomb near the U.S. Embassy in Lima that killed 10, a judge said. The rebels, a man and three women, planted the bomb in a taxi across the street from the embassy days before a visit by President Bush. The man was "found guilty of terrorism and was sentenced to 30 years in prison. The others received 20 years for their terrorist affiliation," said Pablo Talavera, president of the anti-terrorism court.
WORLD
April 19, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A masked man claiming to be the top leader of the Shining Path rebels who are still at large said in radio and TV interviews that the armed struggle was "regrettably" beginning again. Artemio told RPP radio and America Television from his jungle hide-out that he was "giving the government 60 days to come up with a response in the search for a political solution." He did not specify what his demands were or say what would happen if they were not met.
WORLD
November 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Peru's retrial of Shining Path rebel leader Abimael Guzman collapsed after two of the three judges pulled out, citing previous rulings that could cast doubt on their impartiality. The case will have to start again from scratch. The case was annulled after Judge Jose de Vinatea recused himself, saying he had represented accused terrorists in court previously. Another judge, Carlos Manrique, stepped down Friday.
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Guerrillas of Sendero Luminoso, or Shining Path, set off a powerful car bomb that blew off the front of a police station outside Lima, the capital, wounding 25 people, including eight police officers. The attack appeared to be an effort by the Maoist group to re-establish its reputation as the most feared rebel group in Peru, following a four-month hostage crisis led by the smaller Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement.
WORLD
November 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Peru's retrial of Shining Path rebel leader Abimael Guzman collapsed after two of the three judges pulled out, citing previous rulings that could cast doubt on their impartiality. The case will have to start again from scratch. The case was annulled after Judge Jose de Vinatea recused himself, saying he had represented accused terrorists in court previously. Another judge, Carlos Manrique, stepped down Friday.
WORLD
November 13, 2004 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Abimael Guzman, the founder of the Shining Path guerrilla movement, took his seat quietly in the courtroom Friday morning. Ninety minutes later, he stood up, turned to look at the press gallery and gave a broad, satisfied smile. The man who preached chaos as a means to his revolutionary end had once again seen his trial on charges of "terrorist crimes against the public tranquillity" descend into farcical disorder. One member of the three-judge panel overseeing his case suddenly quit.
WORLD
April 19, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A masked man claiming to be the top leader of the Shining Path rebels who are still at large said in radio and TV interviews that the armed struggle was "regrettably" beginning again. Artemio told RPP radio and America Television from his jungle hide-out that he was "giving the government 60 days to come up with a response in the search for a political solution." He did not specify what his demands were or say what would happen if they were not met.
WORLD
June 11, 2003 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
BUENOS AIRES -- Peruvian army troops and police officers Tuesday rescued 71 oil workers taken hostage in the mountain jungles of southeastern Peru by Shining Path guerrillas demanding $1 million in ransom, officials said. The kidnappers, about 20 men and women armed with rifles, shotguns and grenades, had abducted the employees of the Argentine company Techint early Monday after infiltrating the camp dressed as oil workers, according to news reports.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Hungry and limping from an old bullet wound, the top commander of Peru's Sendero Luminoso, or Shining Path, guerrilla movement was snared by army commandos after a two-week pursuit through rugged mountains and jungle. Soldiers captured the elusive Oscar Ramirez Durand, 46, at dawn Wednesday with three female rebels near the highland city of Huancayo, 125 miles east of Lima, the capital.
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Guerrillas of Sendero Luminoso, or Shining Path, set off a powerful car bomb that blew off the front of a police station outside Lima, the capital, wounding 25 people, including eight police officers. The attack appeared to be an effort by the Maoist group to re-establish its reputation as the most feared rebel group in Peru, following a four-month hostage crisis led by the smaller Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement.
NEWS
October 13, 1992
Abimael Guzman, guiding light of Peru's Sendero Luminoso (Shining Path) guerrillas, is expected to lose his final appeal this week against a life sentence imposed by a military court. The Supreme Council of Military Justice will issue its decision by Wednesday. Guzman, 57, was convicted on charges of treason for leading the Maoist rebel movement in a war of terrorism since 1980.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abimael Guzman, patriarch of the ruthless Sendero Luminoso revolutionary movement, lost his last chance Wednesday to overturn a life sentence for "treason against the fatherland." In rejecting his second and final appeal, Peru's Supreme Council of Military Justice sealed Guzman's transformation from a mastermind of terror to a prisoner without prospects. He is to be confined for life to a cell on a navy base off the coast of Lima.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Dynamite exploded in an office building in Lima, causing damage but no deaths or injuries, radio reported. Police arriving at the scene of the 5:30 a.m. blast said they found pamphlets indicating that the 20 ounces of dynamite was planted by rebels from the Maoist Sendero Luminoso (Shining Path), Programas radio said. The name of the business struck was not immediately known.
NEWS
December 26, 1996 | Reuters
Guerrillas of the Maoist group Sendero Luminoso (Shining Path) killed six men in the same family early Wednesday in the northern Peruvian province of Chiclayo, a police official said. The attack came on the ninth day of a hostage crisis in the capital triggered by Peru's other main rebel group, the Marxist Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement.
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