Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSeneca Foods Corp
IN THE NEWS

Seneca Foods Corp

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration has announced a 12-state recall of institutional-size cans of cut green beans that may be contaminated. The recall by Seneca Foods Corp. of Marion, N.Y., involves cans of 6 pounds, 5 ounces and 6 pounds, 6 ounces that have seam defects that could permit the product to become contaminated, officials said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 20, 1992 | From Associated Press
That golden glow in your glass of apple juice isn't looking so rich these days. Flat sales and high costs have some of the nation's largest processors searching for new ways to squeeze cash out of culls. Much of the activity is in central Washington, which grows more than half of the nation's apples. Some companies are experimenting with "natural" apple juices that cost more. Others are diversifying into dried and frozen apple products or pushing for more exports.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 20, 1992 | From Associated Press
That golden glow in your glass of apple juice isn't looking so rich these days. Flat sales and high costs have some of the nation's largest processors searching for new ways to squeeze cash out of culls. Much of the activity is in central Washington, which grows more than half of the nation's apples. Some companies are experimenting with "natural" apple juices that cost more. Others are diversifying into dried and frozen apple products or pushing for more exports.
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration has announced a 12-state recall of institutional-size cans of cut green beans that may be contaminated. The recall by Seneca Foods Corp. of Marion, N.Y., involves cans of 6 pounds, 5 ounces and 6 pounds, 6 ounces that have seam defects that could permit the product to become contaminated, officials said.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1992 | Associated Press
That golden glow in your glass of apple juice isn't looking so rich these days. Flat sales and high costs have some of the nation's largest processors searching for new ways to squeeze cash out of culls. Much of the activity is in central Washington, which grows more than half of the nation's apples. Some companies are testing "natural" apple juices that cost more. Others are diversifying into dried and frozen apple products or pushing for more exports.
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Michael Jordan, before Bo Jackson, before Joe Montana, it was O.J. Simpson who led the way for pro sports team stars to emerge as corporate marketing heroes. Back in 1975, before anyone had even heard of the term sports marketing , Hertz tapped Simpson as its spokesman and emerged as one of the first giant corporations to stake its name on a top-line athlete. That link, best remembered for images of Simpson dashing through airports, helped Hertz cement its No. 1 status.
NEWS
January 12, 1995 | RHONDA HILLBERY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To most people, he's just a familiar green hulk in a leafy toga who peddles vegetables. But here in his birthplace, the Green Giant is a beloved icon and institution. So the recent announcement that the nation's original Green Giant processing plant will close Feb. 8 struck pain into the hearts of the people who live in the valley of the jolly Green Giant. "I think you could compare it almost to a death in your family," said Tim McPartland, the Green Giant plant's manufacturing manager.
NEWS
March 30, 2003 | Linda Ashton, Associated Press Writer
There were no flames, no smoke, no warning. Almost seven years ago, a 16-year-old bird hunter stepped onto a dusty-looking pile of grape pulp and sank into a pit of smoldering 500-degree mash. Phillip Hickle, then a sophomore at Prosser High School, would somehow manage to drag himself out, but he lost both legs from severe burns.
NATIONAL
October 9, 2004 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
Mark Pfeifer loves pumpkin pie more than any sane healthy man should. The warm autumn air is thick and sweet, and the sound of metal blades mashing pumpkins drowns out conversation as Pfeifer -- the operational manager of Libby's processing plant -- loosens his belt for his daily dessert duty. Pfeifer slips into the plant's laboratory. There, among the test tubes and glass beakers, sits a line of pumpkin pies. Warm. Welcoming.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|