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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1994
I wish we'd thought of Prop. 187 first. It would've saved many lives and the destruction of North America. But, no, we had to feed those damn Pilgrims. LARRY HILL, Seneca Nation Long Beach
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NEWS
March 26, 1995 | from Associated Press
A gun battle erupted at dawn Saturday between factions feuding for control of the Seneca Nation of Indians, killing three people. Tensions have been high since Dennis Bowen was elected Seneca president in November and then refused to step down when the tribal council impeached him in February. Council members accused him of refusing to hold meetings, barring opponents from meetings he did hold and kicking two people off the council. They also appointed Karen Bucktooth president.
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NEWS
August 23, 1992 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This small town in the scenic Allegheny Mountains was settled by whites in the early 1800s and is like no other place in the nation. It is the only U.S. municipality that lies almost entirely within the confines of a recognized Indian reserve: the Seneca Nation's 30,469-acre Allegany Reservation. For most of the history of this community, whose present-day population is about 6,600, this unique arrangement presented few problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1994
I wish we'd thought of Prop. 187 first. It would've saved many lives and the destruction of North America. But, no, we had to feed those damn Pilgrims. LARRY HILL, Seneca Nation Long Beach
NEWS
March 26, 1995 | from Associated Press
A gun battle erupted at dawn Saturday between factions feuding for control of the Seneca Nation of Indians, killing three people. Tensions have been high since Dennis Bowen was elected Seneca president in November and then refused to step down when the tribal council impeached him in February. Council members accused him of refusing to hold meetings, barring opponents from meetings he did hold and kicking two people off the council. They also appointed Karen Bucktooth president.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge in Buffalo threw out the Seneca Indian Nation's claim of ownership of Grand Island and other islands in the Niagara River near Buffalo. The ruling dismisses a 9-year-old lawsuit that residents of Grand Island, a suburb of Buffalo, have long claimed has damaged business and property values. U.S.
NEWS
July 17, 1992 | From Associated Press
A tax war between Seneca Indians and New York state grew more divisive Thursday as Indians dropped burning tires off a highway overpass and clashed with state police. Thirteen protesters were arrested early Thursday and seven people, including four state troopers, were injured. More than 200 extra troopers were sent to the Cattaraugus Indian Reservation about 30 miles south of Buffalo, Sgt. Gregory Lang said. The protest focuses on sales taxes.
OPINION
September 12, 1993
Alan Kishbaugh is right on target on the beautiful descriptions of California in the "old days" (Commentary, Sept. 3). Tears came to my eyes as he discussed Angels Flight, the distance between the cities with landscapes of acres and acres of orange trees, and the only freeway being that of the Arroyo Seco. My recollections are of going to "downtown" Los Angeles at Christmastime to see all of the decorated windows. My family would make a big thing of this since we took public transportation from South Gate.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2002 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
For years the Niagara Falls Convention Center was a squat eyesore in the middle of town, a symbol of steady economic decline in a resort city that once billed itself as the honeymoon capital of the world. But on New Year's Eve, the old arena with a leaky roof will be transformed into a glittering, Las Vegas-style casino, the largest Indian-run gambling emporium to open in a U.S. city.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This small town in the scenic Allegheny Mountains was settled by whites in the early 1800s and is like no other place in the nation. It is the only U.S. municipality that lies almost entirely within the confines of a recognized Indian reserve: the Seneca Nation's 30,469-acre Allegany Reservation. For most of the history of this community, whose present-day population is about 6,600, this unique arrangement presented few problems.
NEWS
March 3, 1998 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks after Navajo Nation President Albert Hale resigned amid charges of ethical and financial misdeeds, American Indian officials are scrambling to heal a tribe that is divided over how to interpret conduct on the part of its leaders. Hale, 47, stepped down to avoid facing tribal charges of accepting illegal gifts from companies with tribal contracts--and to prevent a repeat of the deadly riots that followed the ouster of Navajo Chairman Peter MacDonald in 1989 on corruption charges.
NEWS
July 20, 2003 | Helen O'Neill, Associated Press Writer
NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. -- The torrent should have swallowed him long ago, hurling him over the falls and into the whirling depths like thousands of unfortunates who have lost their lives here. And yet, after almost two hours, the unidentified man was still fighting for his life, dangling over the brink of Horseshoe Falls. Some onlookers turned their heads. Others muttered prayers. There was no doubt in anyone's mind that they were watching the end.
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