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March 1, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a dusty roundabout 100 miles or so from the coast of West Africa, an immense white minaret beckons in the haze. A gendarme clad in khaki approaches a visitor's car. "No cigarettes? No alcohol?" he asks. Satisfied that the occupants had left any such contraband behind, he waved them on--and they proceeded into one of the most extraordinary cities in Africa.
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NEWS
April 5, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soap, sugar, milk--any staple a family might need--is ranged on the shelves around Ngaido Ba in the cramped shop he runs on a corner of one of Dakar's oldest quarters. Ba took over the shop just a few months ago after its previous occupants, a Mauritanian family, fled during a wave of attacks last April on thousands of their countrymen living in the Senegalese capital. "We have everything here," Ba remarked to a recent visitor, "just like before, when the Mauritanians were here."
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NEWS
April 5, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soap, sugar, milk--any staple a family might need--is ranged on the shelves around Ngaido Ba in the cramped shop he runs on a corner of one of Dakar's oldest quarters. Ba took over the shop just a few months ago after its previous occupants, a Mauritanian family, fled during a wave of attacks last April on thousands of their countrymen living in the Senegalese capital. "We have everything here," Ba remarked to a recent visitor, "just like before, when the Mauritanians were here."
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a dusty roundabout 100 miles or so from the coast of West Africa, an immense white minaret beckons in the haze. A gendarme clad in khaki approaches a visitor's car. "No cigarettes? No alcohol?" he asks. Satisfied that the occupants had left any such contraband behind, he waved them on--and they proceeded into one of the most extraordinary cities in Africa.
NEWS
January 16, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
On the pink-splashed walls of the university buildings the slogans survive, scrawled in black: " La Lutte Continue ," " A Bas le Fascisme ." The struggle goes on. Down with fascism. "That's from before," said Mamadou Bocoum from his mildewy dormitory room at one end of a dank hallway. "Before we ended the strike." Bocoum is 26 and his eyes were bright with triumph.
NEWS
December 13, 1988 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Slender as a minaret and wrapped in a flowing robe, Abdourahmane Sarr seems to sway a little himself in the smart sea breeze that finds its way from the nearby beach through a stand of evergreen. "The locusts ate half my crops," he says, fingering a denuded tomato branch. "Without them I would have had cabbage by now, but to save it, I delayed the planting instead."
NEWS
January 17, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A good Muslim prays five times a day. For the good Muslims of Senegal, that leaves time for all kinds of other activities. Like dancing. African drums ring out, and girls and young women leap forward one by one. They hike their brightly colored skirts and churn up the back-yard dust in a furious Senegalese dance. Across town, French-speaking high school students in the English-language club meet to perform "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?"
NEWS
January 16, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
On the pink-splashed walls of the university buildings the slogans survive, scrawled in black: " La Lutte Continue ," " A Bas le Fascisme ." The struggle goes on. Down with fascism. "That's from before," said Mamadou Bocoum from his mildewy dormitory room at one end of a dank hallway. "Before we ended the strike." Bocoum is 26 and his eyes were bright with triumph.
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