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Senegal Government

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NEWS
November 9, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Increasing ethnic violence has taken scores of lives and shattered the calm of Senegal, long admired as one of Africa's most tranquil and homogeneous countries. The violence is centered in a region known as the Casamance, which is geographically and culturally isolated from the rest of the country and has nurtured separatist sentiment for decades. Since April, at least 76 people--civilians, guerrillas and government soldiers--have been killed and hundreds injured in the Casamance.
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NEWS
February 27, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When voters in Senegal go to the polls today, their main dilemma will be whether to allow a veteran politician who has been in office for almost 20 years to continue to rule or whether to give their West African nation a taste of new power. The Socialist Party of President Abdou Diouf has ruled Senegal since the nation's independence from France in 1960, and the incumbent, who's been at the country's helm since 1981, is seeking another seven-year term.
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NEWS
February 27, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When voters in Senegal go to the polls today, their main dilemma will be whether to allow a veteran politician who has been in office for almost 20 years to continue to rule or whether to give their West African nation a taste of new power. The Socialist Party of President Abdou Diouf has ruled Senegal since the nation's independence from France in 1960, and the incumbent, who's been at the country's helm since 1981, is seeking another seven-year term.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Increasing ethnic violence has taken scores of lives and shattered the calm of Senegal, long admired as one of Africa's most tranquil and homogeneous countries. The violence is centered in a region known as the Casamance, which is geographically and culturally isolated from the rest of the country and has nurtured separatist sentiment for decades. Since April, at least 76 people--civilians, guerrillas and government soldiers--have been killed and hundreds injured in the Casamance.
NEWS
January 16, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
On the pink-splashed walls of the university buildings the slogans survive, scrawled in black: " La Lutte Continue ," " A Bas le Fascisme ." The struggle goes on. Down with fascism. "That's from before," said Mamadou Bocoum from his mildewy dormitory room at one end of a dank hallway. "Before we ended the strike." Bocoum is 26 and his eyes were bright with triumph.
NEWS
February 28, 1988
Voters in Senegal go to the polls today for presidential and parliamentary elections. President Abdou Diouf, 52, is expected to win a second term. Diouf has said that if he is reelected, he will undertake a "moral cleansing" of the country on the bulge of West Africa. Campaigning ended last week in controversy over the banning of a rally for opposition candidate Abdoulaye Wade in the town of Thies, where police had fought Wade supporters the day before.
NEWS
January 11, 2004 | Edward Harris, Associated Press Writer
Balanced above his sea canoe's empty hold, Daouda Wade levels an accusatory finger at four blots on the horizon -- factory-sized foreign vessels fishing in the Atlantic off West Africa. "Those big boats have caught everything," the 33-year-old fishing captain says. The European-flagged ships are working in Senegal's waters under a four-year, $75-million contract between the European Union and Senegal's government, which says the agreement brings in a steady stream of sorely needed cash.
NEWS
February 15, 2004 | Nafi Diouf, Associated Press Writer
Sitting on an empty can on the sidewalk, arms folded around his head to cover him from the blistering sun, a young boy named Abou is trying to catch up on sleep. His day started well before dawn with a 90-minute hike to the center of Dakar, Senegal's capital. The frail and malnourished child, dressed in dirt-blackened rags, has walked all morning barefoot on baking roads, begging for food and a few coins to take back to his teacher and guardian. "This is my life. I have no choice," Abou says.
TRAVEL
December 1, 1985 | ROBERT EPSTEIN, Epstein is Times executive arts editor.
A cynic would say Mohammed, a cab driver in Cairo, is a scoundrel, a clever merchant on wheels, a tourist-seeking missile. In truth, however, Mohammed is a gentleman, a four-wheeled Chamber of Commerce, Cairo's own Welcome Wagon.
NEWS
January 16, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
On the pink-splashed walls of the university buildings the slogans survive, scrawled in black: " La Lutte Continue ," " A Bas le Fascisme ." The struggle goes on. Down with fascism. "That's from before," said Mamadou Bocoum from his mildewy dormitory room at one end of a dank hallway. "Before we ended the strike." Bocoum is 26 and his eyes were bright with triumph.
NEWS
February 28, 1988
Voters in Senegal go to the polls today for presidential and parliamentary elections. President Abdou Diouf, 52, is expected to win a second term. Diouf has said that if he is reelected, he will undertake a "moral cleansing" of the country on the bulge of West Africa. Campaigning ended last week in controversy over the banning of a rally for opposition candidate Abdoulaye Wade in the town of Thies, where police had fought Wade supporters the day before.
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