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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stepson of Los Angeles City Councilman Gilbert Lindsay asserted in a lawsuit Monday that the aging councilman is senile and lacked the mental capacity to comprehend that his girlfriend deceived him over the last two years, systematically stripping him of nearly all of his property. Lindsay, 90, placed "great trust and confidence" in Juanda Chauncie, 39, his "girlfriend, lover, dependent and confidante," the lawsuit claimed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2013 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
Authorities believe a 78-year-old man thought to have tied a puppy to train tracks in Riverside County last week may have been "senile" and "didn't fully understand what he had done," officials said Tuesday. A train engineer noticed a man walking away from something left on the Mecca-area tracks about 5 p.m. on April 2, Riverside County Animal Services said in a statement Tuesday. That something was a live, 10-month-old poodle-terrier mix. The engineer used the train's emergency brakes to stop and avoided hitting the puppy, officials said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1998
I can't wait for the Information Age to reach senility. BILL ROBBINS Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
With his 30th novel, "The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey," the fascinating Walter Mosley not only returns to top form, but also extends once again the boundaries of the hard-boiled suspense genre in which his best work always has been rooted. No other writer of the 58-year-old Mosley's generation has done quite as much to keep the style of Hammett and Chandler from lapsing into mere mannerism. His popular Easy Rawlins mysteries ? probably his best books until now ? extended the genre's affinity for social realism and added a dimension of historical recovery in portraying African Americans' vital but bittersweet life in postwar Los Angeles.
NEWS
July 24, 1987
Return of the miniskirt? Far out! ("The Mini: Why They Will (or Won't) Wear It" by Mary Rourke, July 10.) As an unabashed and unrepentant '60s booster who works downtown in the ultra-yup Crocker Center, I am sickened by the daily 9-to-5 parade of poor, misguided young things with skirts down to their ankles and the cares of giant corporations weighing down their padded shoulders. Terrorized by the man-hating feminist cant of the '70s, browbeaten by dominant males who've zipped them into the blue-suit cocoon, today's young women need to rediscover fun, and joy, and spontaneity that have no purpose at all: "to dance beneath the diamond sky with one hand waving free," as Bob Dylan once said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1992 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Testimony began Monday in what one courtroom wag predicted will be a "real soap opera:" the trial to determine if the late Councilman Gilbert W. Lindsay's girlfriend and her family took advantage of Lindsay's advanced age to gain control of his property in the last two years of his life. The proceeding is the result of a civil suit filed by the Lindsay estate against Lindsay's onetime fiancee, Juanda Chauncie, 40; her sister, Ann Stevens, and their mother, Alberta Hysaw.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | DAVID LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
"My brother, Joseph, and I began to discuss it: Are we really seeing this, or is it our imagination?" Paul McKernan remembers. "My mother was continuing to maintain her sense of humor and her memory of the distant past, but a short-term aspect of her memory wasn't functioning. It was becoming almost like a fade-out in a movie." Bertha Mary McKernan lived with her husband, Edward, for 34 years in a Montebello duplex. In 1976 he died; she was then 76.
NEWS
November 12, 1986 | From Reuters
Medical researchers have found a drug that appears to improve at least temporarily some of the senility caused by Alzheimer's disease, according to a report published today. The treatment, which uses tablets of a drug called tetrahydroaminoacridine (THA), is not a cure. But results show that in many victims the pills may improve part of the mental deterioration caused by Alzheimer's, especially when the patient is in the early stages of the disease.
NEWS
October 30, 1988 | DANIEL Q. HANEY, Associated Press
Aspirin, the medicine-cabinet marvel that eases pain, lowers fevers and prevents heart attacks, may also conquer a form of senility. New research that is still unpublished and must be confirmed by larger studies suggests that aspirin can stop--and even reverse--the ravages of tiny blood clots inside the head. Dr. John S. Meyer of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston said he has seen apparent improvement over time when aspirin is given to elderly people who have suffered multiple small strokes.
SPORTS
November 21, 1998
It really has been fun to read T.J. Simers' columns since Ryan Leaf ruffled his feathers. Simers' ravings are more enjoyable than the cane-waving of some disheveled old geezer who has had his hat knocked off by a snowball. Ryan Leaf is probably as spoiled and as arrogant as T.J. rants about, but his actions are not nearly as entertaining as the senile frothings found in every one of Simers' articles. DICK PRESTON, Yucaipa
SCIENCE
June 23, 2004 | Eric D. Tytell, Times Staff Writer
Estrogen therapy does not protect women age 65 and older against Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia, as scientists once hoped -- and may in fact slightly hasten senility, according to the latest results of a large women's health study. These results, reported today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., may be the final nail in the coffin of scientists' hopes for estrogen replacement therapy in older women.
NATIONAL
November 29, 2002 | From Associated Press
Abnormal walking patterns in the elderly may be an early warning sign of senility, researchers say. Senior citizens with an odd gait are about 3 1/2 times more likely than others to develop forms of dementia other than Alzheimer's disease, according to a study in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine.
SPORTS
November 21, 1998
It really has been fun to read T.J. Simers' columns since Ryan Leaf ruffled his feathers. Simers' ravings are more enjoyable than the cane-waving of some disheveled old geezer who has had his hat knocked off by a snowball. Ryan Leaf is probably as spoiled and as arrogant as T.J. rants about, but his actions are not nearly as entertaining as the senile frothings found in every one of Simers' articles. DICK PRESTON, Yucaipa
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1998
I can't wait for the Information Age to reach senility. BILL ROBBINS Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1997 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A retired Los Angeles schoolteacher has won a hollow victory in her fight to reclaim $7,000 that her senile father mistakenly paid to the Internal Revenue Service. Although 93-year-old Stanley McGill of Granada Hills owed no taxes when he sent a check in 1984, the IRS kept the money. His daughter did not discover the mistake until he died in 1988--too late to obtain a refund, the IRS said.
NEWS
February 17, 1996 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Supreme Court could be the next stop for a daughter's campaign to force the Internal Revenue Service to refund a $7,000 check mistakenly written by her late father when he was 93 and senile. Although the IRS admits the Granada Hills man never owed such a sum, the agency has steadfastly refused to return his money, saying he missed the deadline to apply for a refund.
NEWS
January 10, 1985 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
A recently identified class of infectious agents that are smaller than viruses has been found to be the cause of a rare and fatal type of human senility, University of California researchers report in today's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.
NATIONAL
November 29, 2002 | From Associated Press
Abnormal walking patterns in the elderly may be an early warning sign of senility, researchers say. Senior citizens with an odd gait are about 3 1/2 times more likely than others to develop forms of dementia other than Alzheimer's disease, according to a study in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1994 | KATHERINE DOWLING, Katherine Dowling is a family physician at the USC School of Medicine.
One of the most striking aspects of a young, dynamic biologic system is variability. The new little heart in your baby daughter can easily speed up by 60 beats a minute when she fusses. Watch a 2-year-old play and you know why menopause occurs as early as it does. A young planet has a dynamic geology and as it ages, geologic processes generally grow more staid. Regularity thus becomes the mark of middle age in most systems, physical or biological.
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