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Senior Drivers

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2000
Re "92-Year-Old's Car Backs Into Bank, Killing Boy, 1," Aug. 30: I'm 76 and you can be sure the day I feel I don't have full control of my ability behind the wheel, I'll turn in my license. And it would be a good idea to find out who OKd the 92-year-old driver's license and how well he passed the tests five days before the accident. GORDON GREEN Encino
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OPINION
August 31, 2012
We don't know definitively that age was a factor in the accident that occurred when a 100-year-old driver - 101 next week - backed his car into a South Los Angeles street, hitting 11 children and adults and seriously injuring four of them. Maybe the brakes on Preston Carter's 22-year-old Cadillac failed, as he told reporters at the scene. Or maybe he made the kind of mistake that any driver of any age might make. Police detectives are still investigating. But once again, a highly publicized accident involving an elderly driver on local streets raises the issue of how closely aging drivers' skills should be monitored.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1999
SB 335, the Brandi Mitock Safe Drivers Act, comes before the Assembly Transportation Committee June 28; another step closer to becoming law. The bill establishes a minimum vision standard; a driver can no longer be legally blind and drive, while requiring periodic road testing (the first time since age 16) for seniors 75 years and older. Discrimination? Hardly. Statistics overwhelmingly support protecting our seniors and those around them with greater vigilance. Seniors are at highest risk for fatal collisions (the No. 1 cause of accidental death among this population)
NEWS
April 16, 2005 | Ronald J. Stupak
Several weeks ago, my wife, Katherine, and I completed an AARP Over-55 Defensive Driving Seminar, and subsequent to that, I renewed my driver's license at a DMV office. These two experiences left me frightened, frustrated and extremely concerned. As a 70-year-old card-carrying member of the increasingly visible "senior citizen class" driving vehicles, I contend that something urgently needs to be done to improve the screening procedures for seniors who want to continue driving.
OPINION
November 25, 2001
Once again you have managed to make it appear that senior drivers are a threat to others on the road ("No Magoos in This Bunch: Older Drivers Keep Sharp," Nov. 20). You show a graphic, "Age and Crash Risk," that appears to indicate that the risk of crashes goes up with the age of the driver. Reading the fine print, it can be determined that these statistics have to do only with fatal crashes, and you actually explain in the text that this is because the older drivers themselves are more susceptible to injuries in crashes.
NEWS
April 16, 2005 | Ronald J. Stupak
Several weeks ago, my wife, Katherine, and I completed an AARP Over-55 Defensive Driving Seminar, and subsequent to that, I renewed my driver's license at a DMV office. These two experiences left me frightened, frustrated and extremely concerned. As a 70-year-old card-carrying member of the increasingly visible "senior citizen class" driving vehicles, I contend that something urgently needs to be done to improve the screening procedures for seniors who want to continue driving.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1999 | Sean Kirwan, (949) 574-4202
The Sea Country Senior & Community Center, 24602 Aliso Creek Road, will hold 55 Alive, a class for senior drivers, from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday and Friday. Cost is $8 and reservations are required. Information and reservations: (949) 362-4342.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2003 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
In this classroom of students, 55-year-old Renee Palmer is a relative youngster. The assistant principal of a Hollywood elementary school believes wholeheartedly in continuing education. So it feels natural, she said, to take a course to improve her driving skills. "I can no longer be in denial, the fact that I am aging," said Palmer, looking up from a workbook at a recent Santa Monica class for senior drivers. "The response time is not as quick as it was when you're younger."
OPINION
November 25, 2001
Once again you have managed to make it appear that senior drivers are a threat to others on the road ("No Magoos in This Bunch: Older Drivers Keep Sharp," Nov. 20). You show a graphic, "Age and Crash Risk," that appears to indicate that the risk of crashes goes up with the age of the driver. Reading the fine print, it can be determined that these statistics have to do only with fatal crashes, and you actually explain in the text that this is because the older drivers themselves are more susceptible to injuries in crashes.
OPINION
September 9, 2001
"Oldest Drivers Found to Have Lowest Crash Rates" (Sept. 5) makes me wonder how in-depth some studies are. Stating that older drivers are more a threat to themselves than to other drivers makes me think about what we used to say about my mother-in-law's driving--that is, how she would comment on how many accidents she saw in her rearview mirror. As we get older our reflexes slow and we often compensate for that by slowing down our pace. While seniors may in fact have fewer accidents, I think it is incorrect to believe they are not, at least in part, the cause of many others, especially those by younger, less experienced and far more impatient drivers whose lack of skill and judgment causes them to be involved in more accidents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2000 | WALTER BERRY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
George Freestone has been driving automobiles for as long as Arizona has been a state. And as he rolls along toward his 102nd birthday in August, he has no plans to relinquish his cherished seat behind the wheel of his 1997 Oldsmobile Eighty Eight. "I've been driving since I was 14, before you even needed a license. Never had a ticket. Never had a problem," said Freestone, whose first job was as an instructor at his father's driving school at age 16.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1999
SB 335, the Brandi Mitock Safe Drivers Act, comes before the Assembly Transportation Committee June 28; another step closer to becoming law. The bill establishes a minimum vision standard; a driver can no longer be legally blind and drive, while requiring periodic road testing (the first time since age 16) for seniors 75 years and older. Discrimination? Hardly. Statistics overwhelmingly support protecting our seniors and those around them with greater vigilance. Seniors are at highest risk for fatal collisions (the No. 1 cause of accidental death among this population)
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