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Senior Leader Deng Xiaoping

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NEWS
June 18, 1989 | From Reuters
Zhao Ziyang, China's Communist Party leader accused of supporting the student pro-democracy movement, has been seen playing golf on a Beijing course, the Japanese daily newspaper Sankei Shimbun said Saturday. Sankei quoted Japanese government sources as saying that Zhao was seen sometime after senior leader Deng Xiaoping appeared in public June 9. Zhao's last public appearance was May 19, when he met protesters in Beijing's Tian An Men Square. A day later, martial law was declared in the Chinese capital, and on June 3-4, a brutal army assault cleared the square of protesters.
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NEWS
June 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
China today completed its purge of disgraced former Communist Party chief Zhao Ziyang, removing him from his last government post for what senior leader Deng Xiaoping called "serious mistakes." Zhao, who sympathized with students seeking democratic reforms, was ousted as vice chairman of the State Central Military Commission by the Chinese legislature. Deng engineered Zhao's formal removal as party leader last weekend. Deng wrote in a letter to the National People's Congress saying that "since Comrade Zhao Ziyang has committed serious mistakes, I proposed his dismissal," the official New China News Agency said.
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NEWS
June 12, 1989 | From Times wire services
In its first criticism of a specific Chinese leader, the United States said today that if senior leader Deng Xiaoping "was responsible for the brutal attack, . . . then he has acted to undercut the very reform process he sought to foster." The State Department also said in a statement that China's efforts to label political opponents "counterrevolutionaries" will not change the fact that large numbers of peaceful demonstrators were killed by troops in Tian An Men Square. "That's a tragedy for China, its people and for the legacy he sought to pass on," State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler told reporters.
NEWS
June 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Senior leader Deng Xiaoping of China said the United States used troops to quell student demonstrations during the 1960s and should not criticize China for its crackdown on dissidents, a Hong Kong newspaper reported. The English-language South China Morning Post on Tuesday published the full speech Deng delivered to senior military officials June 9, five days after the army entered Beijing to put down the pro-democracy movement. Deng noted that Washington has criticized China for suppressing students but said the United States also mobilized troops against student rioters in the 1960s and 1970s.
NEWS
June 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
China today completed its purge of disgraced former Communist Party chief Zhao Ziyang, removing him from his last government post for what senior leader Deng Xiaoping called "serious mistakes." Zhao, who sympathized with students seeking democratic reforms, was ousted as vice chairman of the State Central Military Commission by the Chinese legislature. Deng engineered Zhao's formal removal as party leader last weekend. Deng wrote in a letter to the National People's Congress saying that "since Comrade Zhao Ziyang has committed serious mistakes, I proposed his dismissal," the official New China News Agency said.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | From Reuters
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev ended his historic four-day visit to China today much as he began it--upstaged by protesting Chinese students. Gorbachev wound up his trip in Shanghai after a successful Beijing summit during which his handshake with senior leader Deng Xiaoping symbolized the reconciliation of the Communist superpowers. But his special Aeroflot flight left a city--and a country--convulsed with a growing, student-led campaign for democratic reform. As during his three days in Beijing, the massive protest forced major alterations in Gorbachev's schedule, with planned stops in the historic heart of Shanghai canceled because of the demonstrators.
NEWS
June 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Senior leader Deng Xiaoping of China said the United States used troops to quell student demonstrations during the 1960s and should not criticize China for its crackdown on dissidents, a Hong Kong newspaper reported. The English-language South China Morning Post on Tuesday published the full speech Deng delivered to senior military officials June 9, five days after the army entered Beijing to put down the pro-democracy movement. Deng noted that Washington has criticized China for suppressing students but said the United States also mobilized troops against student rioters in the 1960s and 1970s.
NEWS
April 15, 1989 | From Reuters
Hu Yaobang, former Chinese Communist Party leader, died of a heart attack in Peking this morning, the official New China News Agency said. Hu, once the protege of senior leader Deng Xiaoping and still a member of the party's powerful Politburo, was ousted in January, 1987 by party hard-liners after a wave of student protests calling for more freedom and democracy. Hu, 73, suffered a heart attack April 8, the agency said. He was given all possible medical attention "but to no avail."
NEWS
May 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
Hard-liners moved to tighten their control of China today after moderate Communist Party chief Zhao Ziyang was stripped of his power and placed under house arrest. Students leading the demonstrations that have forced the power struggle continued to occupy Beijing's Tian An Men Square one week after martial law was declared in Beijing. But thousands could be seen leaving, and crowds dwindled to about 15,000. Despite the drop-off and the apparent ouster of Zhao, who had been more conciliatory toward the protesters, students vowed to continue to press for social reforms and the resignation of hard-line Premier Li Peng.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1989 | ROSS TERRILL, Ross Terrill's two most recent books on China are "Mao" and "Madame Mao: The White-Boned Demon," both just published in Chinese in China
"It doesn't pay to speak," the dissident journalist Wang Ruoshui said to me in Beijing, "and also, to have spoken proves of no use." Yet he has been speaking out. Like other intellectuals, Wang, a protege of ousted Communist Party leader Hu Yaobang who died Saturday, is at once bold and deeply frustrated. Overall, the mood in China is mixed. There is an appreciation of the benefits of the 1980s reforms, in rural areas especially where farmers' incomes have risen fourfold in a decade, but a lack of clear agreement on the next steps.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | From Reuters
Zhao Ziyang, China's Communist Party leader accused of supporting the student pro-democracy movement, has been seen playing golf on a Beijing course, the Japanese daily newspaper Sankei Shimbun said Saturday. Sankei quoted Japanese government sources as saying that Zhao was seen sometime after senior leader Deng Xiaoping appeared in public June 9. Zhao's last public appearance was May 19, when he met protesters in Beijing's Tian An Men Square. A day later, martial law was declared in the Chinese capital, and on June 3-4, a brutal army assault cleared the square of protesters.
NEWS
June 17, 1989 | K. SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
While the world watched in horror as army troops and tanks brutally suppressed protesters around Beijing's Tian An Men Square on June 4, a similarly violent confrontation took place in this provincial capital, off camera and out of sight to all but a few Western observers. The details may never be fully known, but what is certain is that thousands of Chengdu residents defied authorities by rushing to defend a student-led demonstration from an attack by police, and that some paid with their lives.
NEWS
June 12, 1989 | From Times wire services
In its first criticism of a specific Chinese leader, the United States said today that if senior leader Deng Xiaoping "was responsible for the brutal attack, . . . then he has acted to undercut the very reform process he sought to foster." The State Department also said in a statement that China's efforts to label political opponents "counterrevolutionaries" will not change the fact that large numbers of peaceful demonstrators were killed by troops in Tian An Men Square. "That's a tragedy for China, its people and for the legacy he sought to pass on," State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler told reporters.
NEWS
May 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
Hard-liners moved to tighten their control of China today after moderate Communist Party chief Zhao Ziyang was stripped of his power and placed under house arrest. Students leading the demonstrations that have forced the power struggle continued to occupy Beijing's Tian An Men Square one week after martial law was declared in Beijing. But thousands could be seen leaving, and crowds dwindled to about 15,000. Despite the drop-off and the apparent ouster of Zhao, who had been more conciliatory toward the protesters, students vowed to continue to press for social reforms and the resignation of hard-line Premier Li Peng.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | From Reuters
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev ended his historic four-day visit to China today much as he began it--upstaged by protesting Chinese students. Gorbachev wound up his trip in Shanghai after a successful Beijing summit during which his handshake with senior leader Deng Xiaoping symbolized the reconciliation of the Communist superpowers. But his special Aeroflot flight left a city--and a country--convulsed with a growing, student-led campaign for democratic reform. As during his three days in Beijing, the massive protest forced major alterations in Gorbachev's schedule, with planned stops in the historic heart of Shanghai canceled because of the demonstrators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1989 | ROSS TERRILL, Ross Terrill's two most recent books on China are "Mao" and "Madame Mao: The White-Boned Demon," both just published in Chinese in China
"It doesn't pay to speak," the dissident journalist Wang Ruoshui said to me in Beijing, "and also, to have spoken proves of no use." Yet he has been speaking out. Like other intellectuals, Wang, a protege of ousted Communist Party leader Hu Yaobang who died Saturday, is at once bold and deeply frustrated. Overall, the mood in China is mixed. There is an appreciation of the benefits of the 1980s reforms, in rural areas especially where farmers' incomes have risen fourfold in a decade, but a lack of clear agreement on the next steps.
NEWS
June 17, 1989 | K. SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
While the world watched in horror as army troops and tanks brutally suppressed protesters around Beijing's Tian An Men Square on June 4, a similarly violent confrontation took place in this provincial capital, off camera and out of sight to all but a few Western observers. The details may never be fully known, but what is certain is that thousands of Chengdu residents defied authorities by rushing to defend a student-led demonstration from an attack by police, and that some paid with their lives.
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | From Reuters
China said today it will publish the autobiography of Vice President George Bush--the favored candidate for the U.S. presidency of China's senior leader Deng Xiaoping. "Looking Forward" has been translated into Chinese and will be published by Peking Modern Press.
NEWS
April 15, 1989 | From Reuters
Hu Yaobang, former Chinese Communist Party leader, died of a heart attack in Peking this morning, the official New China News Agency said. Hu, once the protege of senior leader Deng Xiaoping and still a member of the party's powerful Politburo, was ousted in January, 1987 by party hard-liners after a wave of student protests calling for more freedom and democracy. Hu, 73, suffered a heart attack April 8, the agency said. He was given all possible medical attention "but to no avail."
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