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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2010 | By Jason Song, Howard Blume and Jason Felch, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Board of Education approved Tuesday what would be a landmark court settlement that radically limits the traditional practice of laying off teachers strictly on the basis of seniority. The agreement would cap the number of those dismissals at virtually all schools in the nation's second-largest district. The pact, approved unanimously after a two-hour closed session, also would spare up to 45 struggling schools from layoffs. Many of those schools have disruptive turnover rates among teachers.
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SPORTS
April 22, 2014 | By Eric Pincus
The Lakers have promoted Jim Perzik from general counsel to senior vice president of legal affairs/secretary, while hiring Dan Grigsby to fill Perzik's former position. Grigsby previously was partner and chairman of the National Sports Law Group with the law firm Jeffer Mangels Butler & Mitchell. "Having worked with Dan as our outside legal representative for over 30 years, we're very familiar and comfortable with him, and have the highest regard for him as both an attorney and person,” said Jeanie Buss in a statement Tuesday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2012 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Setting the stage for future legal battles, a state appeals court Friday nullified a settlement that allowed the Los Angeles Unified School District to shield certain schools from teacher layoffs during budget crises. The decision by the California 2nd District Court of Appeal voided a settlement in Reed vs. L.A. Unified that allowed the district to bypass seniority-based layoffs at 45 schools. Those campuses, the district argued, would be heavily affected because many of their faculty members have taught for relatively fewer years and thus accrued little seniority.
OPINION
April 19, 2014
Re "A tax break worth saving," Editorial, April 16 There is no tax break worth saving. All the breaks do is make our tax code a laughingstock. Once we start protecting the "good" breaks, all of them will remain. Arthur Armstrong Manhattan Beach ALSO: Wrapping up the Bell scandal Teachers, seniority and students Tax havens prove alluring to China
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Howard Blume
The Los Angeles Unified School District has exited litigation that seeks to limit the seniority rights of California teachers by voiding several provisions of state law. The lawsuit, filed by the group Students Matter, originally targeted the nation's second-largest school district and two other school systems, as well as state officials and state government. But the organization decided to focus instead on the state, dropping L.A. Unified as a defendant. L.A. Unified and the other districts "are hindered by rigid and outdated state laws that harm students," according to a statement from Students Matter, which is based in Silicon Valley.
SPORTS
November 29, 2013 | Chris Dufresne
The kids are all right, but now it's time for senior leadership. This year's Heisman Trophy race, in case you missed it, has become muddled. The bids of non-seniors Marcus Mariota, Johnny Manziel and Bryce Petty all got sacked last week in losses. Freshman quarterback Jameis Winston is the top player on the nation's No. 2-ranked team, but his Heisman candidacy has been impaired by an investigation into a possible sexual assault. The Florida state attorney may not make a decision about whether to charge Winston until after Heisman ballots are due, so what's a Heisman voter to do?
NATIONAL
April 21, 2013 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer have served longer together than any other pair of California senators - 20 years - and will soon replace Iowa's team as the current longest-serving tandem. In a chamber where the presence of spittoons and snuffboxes testifies to the power of tradition, that historically would have meant they could exert more influence on behalf of the state. For generations, seniority has aided senators in delivering federal largesse back home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2011 | By Jason Felch and Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
In a case that pits the constitutional rights of students against the job protections of teachers, a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge approved a groundbreaking settlement Friday that limits the effect of layoffs on the district's most vulnerable students. Up to 45 Los Angeles Unified School District campuses will be shielded from teacher layoffs altogether, Judge William F. Highberger ordered Friday, and layoffs in the district's other 750 schools must be spread more equitably.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1998
"Layoffs: A Company's Strategy of First Resort" [Nov. 22] and its accompanying articles fail to address a serious problem for workers and a significant cost savings for employers: Frequent layoffs deny employees any seniority. No, I am not talking about seniority in a unionized workplace. I am talking about vesting in a retirement plan or in an employer's contributions to a 401(k) plan. Seniority often rewards employees with increased vacation time or even enrollment in profit-sharing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Snags developed Monday in attempts to resolve a 3-week-old strike by Teamster drivers and two other unions against Hollywood movie and television producers. Sources close to the unions said members of the Teamsters negotiating committee objected to terms dealing with seniority included in a proposed settlement reached over the weekend. One striking driver said that if the drivers are asked to accept a contract where their seniority protections would be eroded, "there will be a riot."
OPINION
April 19, 2014
Re "All schools should have good teachers," Editorial, April 14 In response to your editorial on the effects that seniority layoff rules might have on Los Angeles Unified School District campuses with high numbers of new teachers, I would like to cite my own experience. I came to LAUSD in 2007 to work at the new West Adams Preparatory High School, losing the seniority I had accrued in other districts. Starting in the 2010-11 school year, I had to undergo the ordeal of watching the campus on which I was a founding faculty member be torn apart by layoffs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Hailey Branson-Potts
The walls of Alice Herman's home are covered in photographs. Herman and Sylvia Purdue, her partner of 45 years, smile in scenes from birthdays and hospital rooms. In black-and-white photos from their younger days, their hair is teased, their makeup flawless. After Purdue died a few years ago, Herman was left with two cats and enough money for two months' rent. Years of Purdue's hospital bills had chipped away their savings. Because Purdue died before the Supreme Court struck down a key part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act last summer, Herman could not receive Purdue's Social Security benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Jason Song
Jonathan Lee stood by the large prints of Ein Liz, a female action figure he'd spent the better part of a year creating. The Art Center College of Design senior hoped his pieces would catch the eye of one of the hundreds of possible employers who would inspect students' work during the annual graduation show last week. The 25-year-old admitted to feeling nervous but tried to temper his expectations as representatives from Disney and Google approached his display. He plans to send resumes later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
A decision by a federal appeals court Wednesday could allow for changes in water deliveries to irrigation districts that hold senior rights to Sacramento River supplies. The unanimous opinion by an 11-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned two previous rulings that found the federal government lacked discretion to alter water contracts with senior irrigators in the Sacramento Valley. The new decision sends the matter back to a district court for further consideration, leaving both sides in the nearly decade-old case unsure of the ultimate outcome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Stephen Ceasar
Wildflowers bloomed in a tiny garden - some red, purple and pink. Together, Jennifer Bonilla and Hailey Ordonez tended the patch in South Los Angeles, where the high schooler and the preschooler kept the flowers alive. Fourteen years separated the girls, but relatives noticed striking similarities - their coils of brown hair, their spunk. This week, not far from their garden, Hailey, 4, sat near burning candles, a crucifix and flowers as visitors looked at pictures of her aunt Jennifer.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
Julie K. Xanders is the assistant general counsel/West Coast media of Tribune Co. and serves as senior vice president, legal for the Los Angeles Times. Xanders joined Times Mirror in 1993 as corporate counsel for Times Mirror Cable. She was promoted to assistant general counsel in 1995 for Times Mirror, associate general counsel in 1997, deputy general counsel in 1998, and senior vice president and general counsel for the Los Angeles Times in August 1998.  Prior to joining Times Mirror, Xanders worked for four years in private practice with Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher as an associate attorney.  Born in San Francisco, Xanders earned a doctor of jurisprudence from Boalt Hall School of Law (UC Berkeley)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1989 | CLAUDIA LUTHER, Times Political Writer
The all-important business of congressional committee assignments was completed last week, thus shaping for the next 2 years--and probably well into the future--the influence that can be wielded by Orange County's five Republican congressmen. The assignments were made in the face of a huge net loss in seniority for the county's congressional delegation that was a result of the retirement of Reps. Robert E. Badham (R-Newport Beach) and Daniel E. Lungren (R-Long Beach).
NATIONAL
May 6, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
The Senate dealt a blow to Sen. Arlen Specter's hold on seniority in several key committees, a week after the Pennsylvanian's party switch placed Democrats on the verge of a 60-seat majority. In a unanimous voice vote, the Senate approved a resolution adding Specter to the Democratic side of the dais on the five committees on which he serves, including Judiciary and Appropriations. But Democrats placed Specter in one of the two most junior slots on each of the five committees for the remainder of this Congress, which runs through December 2010.
OPINION
April 14, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
It's nice to know that tens of millions of extra dollars will go to 37 low-income schools after the Los Angeles Unified School District settled a class-action suit on behalf of students. But the lawsuit, undertaken by the American Civil Liberties Union and other groups, was never about money; it was about policies that require teachers with the least seniority to be laid off first when there are staff reductions. So although the added funding will help attract and retain teachers for a few years, the lawsuit fell short of its original aim of doing away with the "last-in-first-out" policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Howard Blume
Los Angeles school district officials announced a lawsuit settlement Tuesday that will provide $60 million in pay increases, services and staff at about three dozen schools, many hit hard by teacher layoffs. But the pact fails to deal with whether instructors should continue to be dismissed based on seniority. The case of Reed vs. L.A. Unified, filed in 2010, was intended to protect a school from disproportionate layoffs during difficult economic times. Three campuses named in the suit had lost about half their faculty because teachers had less experience than those elsewhere in the system.
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