Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSenkaku
IN THE NEWS

Senkaku

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
September 24, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - In its heyday, the largest island was home to several hundred workers who caught fish and collected albatross feathers to adorn women's hats in Europe. Nowadays, the only inhabitants are a hardy band of feral, inbred goats descended from a fecund pair left behind in 1978 by Japanese ultranationalists who wanted to establish a living presence on the otherwise deserted shards of land. Rarely in geopolitics have the stakes been so large over someplace so small. PHOTOS: Anti-Japan protests in China Political scientists have compared the islands so vociferously contested between China and Japan to the Falklands, which sparked the 1982 war between Argentina and Britain.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
December 4, 2013 | By Barbara Demick and Paul Richter
BEIJING - After months of planning a trip to boost U.S. trade with Asia, Vice President Joe Biden instead is leading an urgent diplomatic mission to calm tensions between China and its neighbors and prevent a potential conflict. After arriving here Wednesday, Biden closeted himself with President Xi Jinping for 5 1/2 hours in what U.S. officials described as an effort to reassure anxious allies in the region and prevent escalation of the dispute over China's recent declaration of an air defense identification zone over islands Japan administers.
Advertisement
WORLD
August 20, 2012 | Barbara Demick
Angry youths on Sunday overturned cars and smashed shop windows in anti-Japanese protests across China stemming from a long-standing dispute over uninhabited islands claimed by both countries. Not to be outdone in nationalist fervor, 150 Japanese activists tried to land on the islands in the East China Sea by boat Sunday to commemorate World War II deaths. When that failed, 10 of them swam to one of the rocky islands and tried to plant a Japanese flag. The demonstrations in China were the largest since 2010, when a Chinese fishing captain whose boat collided with a Japanese coast guard vessel was arrested, leading to a protracted standoff.
WORLD
February 21, 2013 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - As Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arrives for a Friday summit with President Obama, trade will be at the top of the diplomatic agenda along with security concerns, including new threats from North Korea and an escalating territorial dispute over islands near Japan. On almost every major issue, political and economic, China's shadow will hover over the talks. Abe, who took office in December as Japan's seventh prime minister in six years, will almost certainly push for strong U.S. backing in Japan's tense standoff with China over the Senkaku islets in the East China Sea, which the Japanese administer but which are also claimed by the Chinese, who call them Diaoyu.
WORLD
January 11, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Chinese and Japanese fighter planes tailed each other over a disputed cluster of uninhabited islands in the East China Sea, raising alarm that a miscalculation could set off an armed confrontation. Chinese military authorities ordered two J-10 fighter planes to perform what China called “verification and monitoring” on Friday after a Chinese transport plane was tailed by Japanese F-15 fighter jets. The incident above the islands, known as Senkaku to the Japanese and Diaoyu to the Chinese, was the most potentially dangerous in months of escalating tensions over the islands.
WORLD
November 27, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
As Japan grapples with its neighbors over contested islands, Japanese goodwill toward China and South Korea has hit record lows, a new government survey has found. Disputes over the Senkaku and Takeshima islands -- known by other names to China and South Korea -- has already taken an economic toll, helping drag down Japanese exports to their lowest point since the economic slowdown three years ago, Bloomberg News reported last week. Shipments to China, the biggest market for Japanese exports, slumped 11.6%.
WORLD
September 11, 2010 | By John M. Glionna and Yuriko Nagano, Los Angeles Times
The arrest of a Chinese fishing boat captain by Japan this week has worsened a historical rift between Tokyo and Beijing over a string of disputed islands and could threaten long-term relations between the two Asian neighbors, experts warned Friday. The Chinese government has twice summoned the Japanese ambassador to decry the arrest Wednesday of the 41-year-old captain, Zhan Qixiong, whose trawler collided with Japanese patrol boats near the uninhabited islands. On Friday, the day after Zhan was turned over to prosecutors, who will consider whether to file charges, Beijing dispatched its own ship to the islands.
WORLD
December 4, 2013 | By Barbara Demick and Paul Richter
BEIJING - After months of planning a trip to boost U.S. trade with Asia, Vice President Joe Biden instead is leading an urgent diplomatic mission to calm tensions between China and its neighbors and prevent a potential conflict. After arriving here Wednesday, Biden closeted himself with President Xi Jinping for 5 1/2 hours in what U.S. officials described as an effort to reassure anxious allies in the region and prevent escalation of the dispute over China's recent declaration of an air defense identification zone over islands Japan administers.
WORLD
December 13, 2012 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Japan scrambled F-15 fighter jets Thursday in response to a Chinese surveillance plane that flew over contested islands in the East China Sea, ratcheting up a dispute that is becoming increasingly worrisome to the international community. By the time the fighters from Okinawa reached the area, the plane belonging to the Chinese Oceanic Administration had flown away and the incident ended without a confrontation. Nonetheless, it set nerves on edge around the region.
WORLD
February 21, 2013 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - As Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arrives for a Friday summit with President Obama, trade will be at the top of the diplomatic agenda along with security concerns, including new threats from North Korea and an escalating territorial dispute over islands near Japan. On almost every major issue, political and economic, China's shadow will hover over the talks. Abe, who took office in December as Japan's seventh prime minister in six years, will almost certainly push for strong U.S. backing in Japan's tense standoff with China over the Senkaku islets in the East China Sea, which the Japanese administer but which are also claimed by the Chinese, who call them Diaoyu.
WORLD
January 11, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Chinese and Japanese fighter planes tailed each other over a disputed cluster of uninhabited islands in the East China Sea, raising alarm that a miscalculation could set off an armed confrontation. Chinese military authorities ordered two J-10 fighter planes to perform what China called “verification and monitoring” on Friday after a Chinese transport plane was tailed by Japanese F-15 fighter jets. The incident above the islands, known as Senkaku to the Japanese and Diaoyu to the Chinese, was the most potentially dangerous in months of escalating tensions over the islands.
WORLD
December 13, 2012 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Japan scrambled F-15 fighter jets Thursday in response to a Chinese surveillance plane that flew over contested islands in the East China Sea, ratcheting up a dispute that is becoming increasingly worrisome to the international community. By the time the fighters from Okinawa reached the area, the plane belonging to the Chinese Oceanic Administration had flown away and the incident ended without a confrontation. Nonetheless, it set nerves on edge around the region.
WORLD
November 27, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
As Japan grapples with its neighbors over contested islands, Japanese goodwill toward China and South Korea has hit record lows, a new government survey has found. Disputes over the Senkaku and Takeshima islands -- known by other names to China and South Korea -- has already taken an economic toll, helping drag down Japanese exports to their lowest point since the economic slowdown three years ago, Bloomberg News reported last week. Shipments to China, the biggest market for Japanese exports, slumped 11.6%.
WORLD
September 24, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - In its heyday, the largest island was home to several hundred workers who caught fish and collected albatross feathers to adorn women's hats in Europe. Nowadays, the only inhabitants are a hardy band of feral, inbred goats descended from a fecund pair left behind in 1978 by Japanese ultranationalists who wanted to establish a living presence on the otherwise deserted shards of land. Rarely in geopolitics have the stakes been so large over someplace so small. PHOTOS: Anti-Japan protests in China Political scientists have compared the islands so vociferously contested between China and Japan to the Falklands, which sparked the 1982 war between Argentina and Britain.
WORLD
September 18, 2012 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - The worst of the anti-Japanese protests that have swept China in recent days may be over. The financial fallout for the world's second- and third-biggest economies may be just beginning. Japanese-owned factories, restaurants, mini-marts and clothing retailers across China closed en masse Tuesday as protests continued in nearly 100 cities, sparked by a dispute over control of uninhabited islands near Taiwan. Automakers Nissan, Honda, Toyota and Mazda suspended operations at some plants, as did Sony.
WORLD
August 20, 2012 | Barbara Demick
Angry youths on Sunday overturned cars and smashed shop windows in anti-Japanese protests across China stemming from a long-standing dispute over uninhabited islands claimed by both countries. Not to be outdone in nationalist fervor, 150 Japanese activists tried to land on the islands in the East China Sea by boat Sunday to commemorate World War II deaths. When that failed, 10 of them swam to one of the rocky islands and tried to plant a Japanese flag. The demonstrations in China were the largest since 2010, when a Chinese fishing captain whose boat collided with a Japanese coast guard vessel was arrested, leading to a protracted standoff.
WORLD
September 24, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack, Los Angeles Times
Japan released the Chinese fishing boat captain Saturday whose detention after straying into disputed waters had enraged Beijing and sparked the worst diplomatic crisis between the long-contentious neighbors in years. Zhan Qixiong flew out of Ishigaki airport in southern Japan after mounting pressure and threats from Beijing had stirred fears of serious economic repercussions for the island nation. The announcement came as mounting pressure and threats from Beijing stirred fears of serious economic repercussions for the island nation.
OPINION
September 26, 2010 | Doyle McManus
Now that China has become a global economic power, it's beginning to throw its weight around Asia as a military power as well. That's making China's neighbors — and the United States — nervous. And for good reason. China and its neighbors disagree over who owns hundreds of islands in East Asia's seas – and, more important, vast offshore areas around those islands that could yield oil, gas or minerals. In the South China Sea, parts of whose waters are claimed by many nations, a Chinese-built submersible set a record last summer by diving more than two miles to survey the seabed and to plant a Chinese flag on the bottom.
OPINION
April 6, 2011 | By Joseph S. Nye Jr
Last year, when China broke off military-to-military talks following the Obama administration's long-expected sale of defensive arms to Taiwan, a high American official asked his Chinese counterpart why China reacted so strongly to something it had accepted in the past. The answer: "Because we were weak then and now we are strong. " On a recent visit to Beijing, I asked a Chinese expert what was behind the new assertiveness in China's foreign policy. His answer: "After the financial crisis, many Chinese believe we are rising and the U.S. is declining.
OPINION
September 26, 2010 | Doyle McManus
Now that China has become a global economic power, it's beginning to throw its weight around Asia as a military power as well. That's making China's neighbors — and the United States — nervous. And for good reason. China and its neighbors disagree over who owns hundreds of islands in East Asia's seas – and, more important, vast offshore areas around those islands that could yield oil, gas or minerals. In the South China Sea, parts of whose waters are claimed by many nations, a Chinese-built submersible set a record last summer by diving more than two miles to survey the seabed and to plant a Chinese flag on the bottom.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|