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WORLD
January 5, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
For most of his life, record store owner Kim Ji-yun has battled against a feeling he has trouble describing; a mystery of the soul, a puzzle that many say helps define their culture ? the ineffable sadness of being Korean. The concept is known as han . And for the nearly 50 million South Koreans it's as amorphous a notion as love or hate: intensely personal, yet carried around collectively, a national torch, a badge of suffering tempered by a sense of resiliency. "As a Korean, it's embedded in your DNA," said the ponytailed Kim, 46, pensively stroking his thin beard.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Robert Abele
A resourcefully stylish indie sci-fi entry from Britain, "The Machine" drapes sleek visuals over an artificial intelligence tale set in a top-secret British government facility where robots are being developed to fight a cold war with China. Empathic computer genius Vincent (Toby Stephens) has more on his mind, however, than creating a weapon-strength, self-aware being for his military boss (Denis Lawson). Vincent imagines a revolutionary future in which the brain-damaged (be they wounded soldiers or his medically afflicted daughter)
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BUSINESS
September 28, 2009 | David Gelles
Each Internet fad is followed by a wave of books seeking to explain, analyze and capitalize on the trend of the moment. Self-proclaimed experts churn out guides, surveys and instruction manuals for search, e-commerce and blogs. So it was inevitable that Twitter, the messaging service that has exploded in popularity, would receive similar treatment. Several books with Twitter in the title have already appeared; now comes "Twitterville" by Shel Israel. As a self-styled social media expert, Israel might look the type to write meandering assessments of the latest Web craze.
SPORTS
April 23, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
Having a day off on Wednesday, Simi Valley baseball Coach Matt La Belle decided to take his players on a short field trip to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum to see the best exhibition of baseball memorabilia outside of the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. Through Sept. 4, the Reagan Library has a baseball exhibition of more than 800 artifacts . Much of it is from the collection of L.A.-based Gary Cypres. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com
SPORTS
February 21, 2009
So, I notice that T.J. Simers tells a couple of those who wrote to him regarding his various columns that, "If you're going to start making sense, this [being on Page 2] is no place for you." Aha! At last we see why Simers is on Page 2. It all makes sense now. Mike Kilgore Mar Vista
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
A child's impulse to instantly spend a monetary windfall from grandma is understandable. But is it healthy? Even if he or she is just a kid?    Youth financial literacy expert John Lanza says it's important for parents to create good habits now so children don't have to break bad habits later. "Kids get the spend message as early as 2," Lanza said in an email. "Therefore, it's really important that they are exposed to equally powerful messages about sharing [charitable giving]
NEWS
October 21, 1988
In the article on Quayle's grandmother, I was amused to see her called an "aristocrat." Does lots of money make you one? MARGARET CRALLE Arcadia
OPINION
April 9, 2006
Re "The Glory of Their Times," Column One, April 6 David Wharton's article about the Carmelita Chorizeros was fascinating, one of those really good stories about 20th century L.A. that one might otherwise hear by word of mouth alone. I lived in Alhambra until 2000, and the logo of the Carmelita Chorizo factory was something I'd see every time I drove up the (still incomplete) 710 Freeway to enter the 10 Freeway going east. The pig with a cap and baseball bat now makes sense to this expatriate, and I can admit now that I used to really wonder about the logo.
SCIENCE
April 1, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Happy April Fool's Day! Why not celebrate with a little humor from the world of science? No, that's not an April Fool's joke. It really IS possible to blend humor with science and math. The American Chemical Society proves it in the video above. You may find some of the jokes funnier than others. One of my favorites: “Never trust an atom - they make up everything.” There's another gem about two glasses of water concerned about the too-cool-for-school behavior of their ice-cube son. The punch line requires a junior-high understanding of chemistry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2001
Re "Gas Bounty Amid Natural Treasures: A Volatile Mix," April 30: William Perry Pendley, who seeks to overturn the ban on oil and gas leasing in portions of Montana's Rocky Mountain Front, claims that no one has ever heard of the concept of remote frontier evoking a special "sense of place." Who is he trying to kid? The concept has been with us for centuries. Henry David Thoreau wrote of place: "Where the land, the flora and fauna, the people, their culture, their language and arts were still ordered by energies and interests fundamentally their own, not by the homogenization and normalization of modern life."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Hailey Branson-Potts
The cathedral was full - the choir seats filled by uniformed police officers - but it was silent as the microphone was lowered for the little boy. Ten-year-old Jonathan Navarro looked out at the hundreds of officers seated before him to mourn his uncle, LAPD Officer Christopher A. Cortijo, and began speaking directly to the fallen officer. "Uncle Chris, I will always remember you," he said. "You took your time with me and treated me with tough love. You are my hero. " Hundreds of people gathered in downtown Los Angeles early Tuesday to pay their final respects to Cortijo, a Los Angeles Police Department motorcycle officer who died earlier this month after being struck by a driver suspected of being under the influence of cocaine.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2014 | By Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz
Between the bouncy music and the stacks of colorful jeans, visitors to the Benetton store on Chicago's Michigan Avenue might catch a whiff of a growing marketing trend. Mounted high in the corner beside the store entrance, a scent diffuser, installed in November, spreads a bright spring fragrance modeled after Benetton's Verde cologne. "It finishes the emotion we are trying to create in the store," said Robert Argueta, director of visual merchandising for the United Colors of Benetton, who also is testing the scent in Benetton's New York flagship store.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
INDEPENDENCE, Calif. - One by one, a parade of Owens Valley residents rose at a public hearing Tuesday to assail the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's plan to meet its renewable energy goals by covering 2 square miles of high desert with 1 million solar panels. "We believe in economic development - but this is not the kind we want," Jane McDonald, who helps run a farmer's market, said at the DWP's first public presentation of the project during an Inyo County Board of Supervisors hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
It's rather refreshing that the next California Assembly Speaker spent her early years in a house with no indoor plumbing. Her family carried in water from a spring for drinking, cooking and washing. For a bathroom, they trekked to an outhouse. Assemblywoman Toni Atkins' father was a coal and lead miner; her mother a seamstress. The parents and their four kids crammed themselves into a little four-room house in rural southern Virginia. So when the Democrat, a San Diego transplant, talks about poor people and their housing needs, she isn't just whistling Dixie.
OPINION
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
No one should have expected that putting more vegetables in front of elementary school students would instantly turn them into an army of broccoli fans. Plenty of food has been thrown out since new federal rules took effect in 2011 requiring students in the subsidized school lunch program to choose a fruit or vegetable each day. Nevertheless, studies find that continued exposure to produce is resulting in more children eating at least some of it. That's worth a certain amount of wasted food.
IMAGE
April 6, 2014 | By Ingrid Schmidt
They share vintage fashion finds, finish one another's sentences and collectively compose pop-rock songs. Kesha and Katy Perry are fans, and their dream is to perform with Prince. But for now they'll have to settle for appearing at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival on Friday and April 18, part of a U.S. tour that begins next week. "They" are Haim, the San Fernando Valley-raised sister trio (Este, Danielle and Alana), known for their catchy 2013 debut album, "Days Are Gone" - and their style.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2005 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
The painting format employed by Adam Ross has remained consistent for much of the last decade. Canvases often 4 feet tall and 6 feet wide are painted with oil and alkyd (a synthetic resin) to create an ambiguous, atmospheric sense of space. An acrid, caustic quality is carried by the choice of metallic and sulfurous colors. Webs of precise drawing recall fragments of architectural drafting, while shapes are mostly rectilinear and crystalline.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2009 | William Heisel
The gig: Founder and chief executive of LRN, a Los Angeles firm with offices worldwide that helps companies manage their legal compliance, ethics education, environmental innovation and social responsibility. He also wrote the book "How: Why How We Do Anything Means Everything." Hard knocks: Seidman grew up dyslexic, shy and chubby. He also grew up rootless.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Sharon Mizota
Lew Thomas' first U.S. solo exhibition in almost 20 years focuses on work from the 1970s, creating a kind of bridge between the early days of Conceptual art and the 1980s “Pictures” generation. In this sense, the content and style of the show at Cherry and Martin is familiar; more surprising is the way Thomas' deadpan sense of humor comes through. “34 Avenue Between Geary and Clement” from 1972 is a series of photographs of every building on a San Francisco block. It's urban density's answer to Ed Ruscha's 1966 “Every Building on the Sunset Strip.” Elsewhere, Thomas' work aligns with that of artists like Sherrie Levine and Louise Lawler, who shifted art's focus to the context surrounding the work.
SCIENCE
April 1, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Happy April Fool's Day! Why not celebrate with a little humor from the world of science? No, that's not an April Fool's joke. It really IS possible to blend humor with science and math. The American Chemical Society proves it in the video above. You may find some of the jokes funnier than others. One of my favorites: “Never trust an atom - they make up everything.” There's another gem about two glasses of water concerned about the too-cool-for-school behavior of their ice-cube son. The punch line requires a junior-high understanding of chemistry.
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