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NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Stacey Leasca
A bra that helps stop you from pigging out when you're an emotional mess. An uplifting experience? That's what Microsoft is going for with its prototype “smart bra.” A team of researchers at Microsoft developed the smart bra that comes embedded with sensors, similar to that of an EKG, that monitor a woman's heart rate to track her mood throughout the day. The aim in developing the smart bra is to track the wearer's emotional state throughout...
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WORLD
March 21, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
A fleet of navy ships and advanced search aircraft from 26 nations have been scouring vast expanses of the Indian Ocean, looking for seat cushions, door panels or aluminum that might help solve the mystery of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. But noticeably absent from the search has been the unmanned technology that has become a centerpiece of the Obama administration's national security strategy and defined 21st century warfare. Drones, which are relied on to hunt and destroy targets in the Middle East and Central Asia, aren't capable of looking for the missing Boeing 777, military officials said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2010 | By Shane Goldmacher
Speeding may be dangerous for drivers, but it could soon be a boon for California's fiscal health. Tucked deep into the budget that Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger unveiled Friday is a plan to give cities and counties the green light to install speed sensors on red-light cameras to catch -- and ticket -- speeding cars. Those whizzing by the radar-equipped detectors at up to 15 mph over the limit would have to pay $225 per violation. Those going faster would be fined $325. Small-government advocates want to put the brakes on the plan.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Quirky Spotter is a small device users can attach anywhere in their home to use as a motion, light, sound, temperature or humidity sensor. Priced at $49.99, the Spotter connects with users' smartphones to notify them when it senses a change in its environment. Users set up the device and program it to deliver notifications depending on the activity they want to monitor. PHOTOS: 10 ways to use the sharing economy For example, the Spotter can be used as a baby monitor when programmed to sense sound.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
While rising to chief technology officer for Magellan Navigation in the 1990s, Anatole Lokshin pioneered the use of the global positioning system in everyday life, bringing the satellite-based technology to boats, cars and eventually cellphones. Now, running a startup with his son, the Huntington Beach inventor wants to latch sophisticated motion sensors onto surfboards, skateboards, snowboards and regular clothing. Data collected by Lokshin's sensors could separate pros from posers in sports that typically emphasize imprecise metrics such as style points.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum
Three strangers waited for the elevator in the lobby of a Mid-Wilshire-area office building Monday morning. One of them pushed the "up" button. Nothing happened. He pushed it again. Still nothing. Five long minutes passed. Resigned, the man took a Korean-language newspaper from a stand and started reading. Similar scenes played out across the region Monday after Sunday's magnitude 7.2 earthquake in Baja California stopped or slowed elevator service in many Southern California buildings.
SPORTS
December 13, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
A hard hit rattles a football player's helmet, prompting vibrations in an athletic trainer's pocket. If the trainer wasn't already, he (or she) starts watching the player for signs of a concussion. The wireless alert system from helmet maker Riddell is one of several technologies aimed at spotting potentially concussion-causing head impacts. But getting players and parents to try them remains a challenge. Westlake Village Westlake High purchased 25 sensors this summer and offered them to its 120 players for $150 on a first-come, first-served basis.
NATIONAL
October 19, 2012 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - An Obama administration plan to install new cameras and improved ground sensors along the Southwest border has stalled, potentially creating unnecessary dangers for agents there. Officials say a false alarm from a ground sensor in southern Arizona was to blame when several U.S. Border Patrol agents rushed to the remote canyon on horseback Oct. 2, shortly after midnight. For reasons still unclear, the agents opened fire on one another. One was killed and another wounded.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2010 | Steve Johnson
Don't be surprised if one day your refrigerator nags you to lose weight, your phone blocks calls it figures you're too stressed to handle, and your wisecracking car entertains you with pun-filled one liners. Within a decade or two, researchers at Silicon Valley companies and elsewhere predict, consumer gadgets will be functioning like hyper-attentive butlers, anticipating and fulfilling people's needs without having to be told. Life would not only be more convenient, it might even last longer: Devices could monitor people's health and step in when needed to help them get better.
NEWS
October 20, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pilotless aircraft that so far have been used mostly to identify targets in Afghanistan are likely to play an even greater role as the United States expands its military campaign there. Although the drones continue to be a key reconnaissance tool, they are increasingly being used to provide immediate damage assessments, allowing fighter jets to quickly return to targets that may have been missed by earlier airstrikes.
AUTOS
December 18, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
Ford has announced it is joining a growing list of automakers who are taking a serious look at the future of self-driving cars. The automaker has teamed up with the University of Michigan and State Farm Insurance to develop an autonomous Ford Fusion Hybrid test car. The collaboration will use the car to develop technologies that Ford and its suppliers can use on a future generation of vehicles. "The Ford Fusion Hybrid automated vehicle represents a vital step toward our vision for the future of mobility," Bill Ford, Ford's executive chairman, said in a statement.
SPORTS
December 13, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
A hard hit rattles a football player's helmet, prompting vibrations in an athletic trainer's pocket. If the trainer wasn't already, he (or she) starts watching the player for signs of a concussion. The wireless alert system from helmet maker Riddell is one of several technologies aimed at spotting potentially concussion-causing head impacts. But getting players and parents to try them remains a challenge. Westlake Village Westlake High purchased 25 sensors this summer and offered them to its 120 players for $150 on a first-come, first-served basis.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Stacey Leasca
A bra that helps stop you from pigging out when you're an emotional mess. An uplifting experience? That's what Microsoft is going for with its prototype “smart bra.” A team of researchers at Microsoft developed the smart bra that comes embedded with sensors, similar to that of an EKG, that monitor a woman's heart rate to track her mood throughout the day. The aim in developing the smart bra is to track the wearer's emotional state throughout...
BUSINESS
November 25, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Apple has confirmed its acquisition of PrimeSense, an Israel-based company that specializes in making chips used in 3-D motion sensors. The move may signal Apple's plans to increase use of the technology that allows gestures to control functions on devices. So far, PrimeSense's biggest claim to fame is helping Microsoft create the Kinect, a 3-D motion sensor for the Xbox. Apple was rumored to have purchased PrimeSense last week, but it has just now been confirmed by the two companies.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
While rising to chief technology officer for Magellan Navigation in the 1990s, Anatole Lokshin pioneered the use of the global positioning system in everyday life, bringing the satellite-based technology to boats, cars and eventually cellphones. Now, running a startup with his son, the Huntington Beach inventor wants to latch sophisticated motion sensors onto surfboards, skateboards, snowboards and regular clothing. Data collected by Lokshin's sensors could separate pros from posers in sports that typically emphasize imprecise metrics such as style points.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien, Los Angeles Times
Fly toy helicopters with your mind. Be a DJ and shift musical tracks based on how you feel. Wiggle robotic cat ears by increasing your state of calm. Astonishing advances in the ability to harness brain waves have made the fantastic notion of moving and controlling objects with the mind possible. Now neuroscientists are grappling with another challenge: Find a "killer app" that will demonstrate the true potential of tapping into brain waves and ignite the neurotechnology revolution.
SCIENCE
September 1, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Slave to your email? Wonder what would happen if you had to do without it? UC Irvine informatics professor Gloria Mark was curious - so she recently led a study that separated 13 people from their email for five days and recorded what happened when they unplugged. Mark spoke with The Times about the joys and sorrows of ditching email and why the Army is interested in her research. What made you want to see how people fared without email? That was way back in 2005. I had this crazy idea that people were addicted to email.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien, Los Angeles Times
Fly toy helicopters with your mind. Be a DJ and shift musical tracks based on how you feel. Wiggle robotic cat ears by increasing your state of calm. Astonishing advances in the ability to harness brain waves have made the fantastic notion of moving and controlling objects with the mind possible. Now neuroscientists are grappling with another challenge: Find a "killer app" that will demonstrate the true potential of tapping into brain waves and ignite the neurotechnology revolution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2013 | Joseph Serna
In the seismic annals of California, Monday's magnitude 4.7 earthquake was little more than a footnote. It gave Southern California a small morning jolt but caused no damage and was largely shrugged off by noon. But in one important way, the quake was highly significant because it marked an advance in California's burgeoning earthquake early warning system. The quake struck in the desert town of Anza, about 35 miles south of Palm Springs, and hundreds of sensors embedded in the ground immediately sent an alert to seismologists at Caltech in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2013 | By David Ng
The Watts Towers in South Los Angeles will be the subject of a new study conducted by experts from UCLA to determine the stability of the historic sculptures, which were completed by Simon Rodia in 1954. The study, now  underway, is expected to be completed by early next year. Chief among the concerns are cracks that have plagued the towers for many years. Sensors have been placed around the site to measure variables such as wind and sun exposure. Experts are also measuring the effects that earthquakes have had on the sculptures.  The study is being carried out by engineers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science.
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