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October 20, 1988 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
Two affiliated Wisconsin-based insurance companies, Sentry Insurance, a mutual company, and Dairyland Insurance Co., have decided to discontinue writing personal auto and other lines of insurance in California because the number of claims and lawsuits were too high, a spokeswoman for the companies said Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
October 20, 1988 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
Two affiliated Wisconsin-based insurance companies, Sentry Insurance, a mutual company, and Dairyland Insurance Co., have decided to discontinue writing personal auto and other lines of insurance in California because the number of claims and lawsuits were too high, a spokeswoman for the companies said Wednesday.
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NEWS
November 21, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
John Joanis, who built a small insurance company into the Sentry Insurance conglomerate and was chairman of its board, has died at the age of 67. He died Monday at St. Joseph's Hospital, which did not disclose the cause of death. Joanis was admitted to St. Michael's Hospital in Stevens Point, Wis., home of Sentry's headquarters, on Oct. 29, when he was experiencing discomfort in his lungs. He was transferred Nov. 3 to St. Joseph's, where he had undergone heart surgery two years ago.
NEWS
February 28, 1992 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The California Supreme Court ruled unanimously Thursday that an employee who was forced to quit for supporting a co-worker's claim of sexual harassment may sue his former employer for damages. The court upheld a $1.34-million award to the employee, a former insurance sales manager, saying that the employer violated public policy by trying to get him to withhold information from state authorities investigating the female co-worker's harassment complaint.
NEWS
October 29, 1986 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
The state Insurance Department on Tuesday issued a report of complaints against auto insurance companies in California, showing that among the 25 largest sellers, doing 90% of all business in the state, the California State Auto Assn., serving Northern California, had the best record. Second best was the military-affiliated USAA company, while State Farm was third best.
TRAVEL
March 24, 1985 | BETTY HUGHESBD Assistant Travel Editor and
Read all the fine print on travel insurance policies concerning what could happen--accidental death, dismemberment, loss of sight, trip cancellation, bankruptcies, tour company defaults, hijackings, lost baggage, stolen passports, medical evacuation--and it's a wonder that anyone ever leaves home. However, you should quickly realize that the insurance companies are getting richer daily because these things seldom happen to the vast majority of policy holders.
NEWS
February 10, 1989 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
The insurance industry's efforts to hold steady against a tide of anti-industry sentiment brought mixed results Thursday as the Senate revived legislation that would prevent arbitrary policy cancellations but rejected a bill to keep insurers from using a variety of techniques to boost premiums. Both measures encountered strong opposition from Republicans, who argued that their passage would create an anti-business climate in California.
NEWS
February 10, 1989 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
In the first full year of enforcement of California's mandatory auto insurance law, 554,219 drivers had their licenses suspended after being unable to show proof of coverage when they were stopped for traffic violations, according to state records. Of these 1988 suspensions, 262,898 drivers had not demonstrated by the end of the year that they had purchased the required liability coverage and their licenses remained suspended, a Department of Motor Vehicles spokesman said.
NEWS
June 12, 1987 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
The latest effort by the California Department of Insurance to rate automobile insurance firms on the basis of consumer complaints drew somewhat muted comment Thursday--at least from those who compiled the study. "This is just another guideline for the consumer to use in making a choice for his personal automobile insurance," said David Stolls, chief of the department's policy services bureau.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1990 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Brentwood Associates collected $140 million for a new leveraged buyout fund in late 1988, the investment firm's high-powered clients probably didn't expect to wait 18 months for their first deal. But wait they did. Brentwood felt that the prices companies were fetching in LBOs in 1988 and 1989 were absurdly high. So the firm said no thanks. Today, Brentwood's partners look like heroes for avoiding the LBO market's peak.
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