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OPINION
November 14, 2006
A MONTH AFTER North Korea tested a nuclear bomb, making the Korean peninsula a more dangerous place, the peninsula's other nation stepped forward with its response. Or rather, its lack thereof. On Monday, South Korea announced that it would impose no new sanctions on its northern neighbor. South Korea's reluctance to crack down on Kim Jong Il's regime could undermine the coming six-nation disarmament talks, scheduled for next month and involving both Koreas and the U.S., Japan, Russia and China.
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NEWS
June 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
Several thousand nurses and other workers walked off their jobs at eight hospitals Wednesday, joining a strike by South Korean airline, chemical and metal workers. As the new workers joined the strike, however, 1,600 pilots at Korean Air ended their two-day walkout. The nation's other airline, Asiana, remained strikebound. The workers were protesting President Kim Dae Jung's corporate reform programs, which workers blame for causing mass layoffs. The government called the strikes illegal.
TRAVEL
December 17, 2000 | KRISTIN L. JOHANNSEN, Kristin L. Johannsen is a freelance writer who lives in Berea, Ky
Behind this city's ultramodern facade, beyond the endless concrete walls and drab, boxy buildings that line the downtown streets, hides a unique, traditional culture where rare treasures like the kaleidoscope-painted palaces of Korean kings can be found. Seek them out and you'll find other surprises, like busy herbal medicine markets, colorful folk villages and tranquil teahouses.
NEWS
May 17, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER and SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writers
The Olympic clock is ticking: On small digital displays in hotels and government offices and on a huge scoreboard mounted above the plaza in front of City Hall, South Koreans are counting the days until the Olympic Games begin Sept. 17. But it is early August that many observers of North Korea, worried about terrorist attacks, are anxiously awaiting.
NEWS
October 3, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
According to eyewitnesses, an American was robbed here Sunday. But there was some consolation. People of Seoul stopped Americans on the street near the city's sports complex to apologize for the decision that cost boxer Roy Jones of Pensacola, Fla., a gold medal. There were similar reactions from Korean Broadcasting System commentators who criticized as unfair the 3-2 decision by non-Korean judges that Jones, 19, had lost to Korean boxer Park Si Hun in the 156-pound class.
NEWS
June 30, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Roh Yoon Soo has sat in his tiny newsstand kiosk in the heart of downtown Seoul six days a week for the past 15 years, and never before has he sold as many newspapers as he did on Monday. "I sold 10 times the papers today that I do in an ordinary day," said the ruddy-faced Roh, 55, his wide grin showing a few silver teeth and a personal joy that went far beyond his profits. "All of the Korean people are very happy today," he said. "From today, I think, we will all begin to live well."
NEWS
June 27, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
In a country purged of normal politics by an authoritarian government, national issues are often taken to the streets. Since the anti-government protests broke out June 10, student leaders have put more than 100,000 followers into street demonstrations. Word was passed on Seoul's more than 20 college campuses, and for Friday night's demonstrations leaflets were distributed downtown asking for support and designating assembly points.
SPORTS
September 18, 1987 | Associated Press
Dancers beating drums and twirling streamers cavorted to the beat of rock bands and trumpet fanfares Thursday as the one-year countdown to the Seoul Olympics began. Hundreds of musicians, dancers and drum majorettes celebrated in the large square in front of Seoul city hall as large crowds watched. Hundreds of police ringed the square to prevent anti-government protests, but no incidents were reported. The Games are scheduled to run from Sept. 17 to Oct. 2 next year in the Korean capital.
TRAVEL
December 17, 2000 | KRISTIN L. JOHANNSEN, Kristin L. Johannsen is a freelance writer who lives in Berea, Ky
Behind this city's ultramodern facade, beyond the endless concrete walls and drab, boxy buildings that line the downtown streets, hides a unique, traditional culture where rare treasures like the kaleidoscope-painted palaces of Korean kings can be found. Seek them out and you'll find other surprises, like busy herbal medicine markets, colorful folk villages and tranquil teahouses.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ticketmaster Online-CitySearch, the Pasadena company that has created dozens of Web guides for cities in the U.S., Canada, Europe and Australia, will build its first site for Asia in partnership with Korea Information & Communications Co. The site, to be announced Tuesday, will focus on recreation, entertainment, arts and shopping in the South Korean capital of Seoul. The site will also use Ticketmaster Online-CitySearch's technology for offering online auctions and personal ads.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Singer Michael Jackson thrilled South Koreans on Friday by agreeing to invest $100 million in a ski resort in South Korea's southwestern mountains, with an eye to building a "Neverland Asia" theme park, according to his new business partner, Ssangbangwool Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1993
What president recently completed his first 100 days in office with an extraordinarily high popular rating, after making good on his campaign promises to carry out a number of major, near-revolutionary political changes? The answer is Kim Young Sam, South Korea's first truly civilian president in nearly three decades, a respected longtime dissident who now heads a sometimes uneasy ruling party coalition of old-line conservatives and determined reformers.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea is preparing to voice high-level concern to the Clinton Administration about an emerging new American military strategy in which the United States, largely for budgetary reasons, would stand prepared to fight only one major war at a time, South Korean officials said Friday.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo, in a move affirming that he intends to deal sternly with anti-government protests, shuffled his Cabinet on Sunday, making only four changes and including the appointment of yet another law-and-order man. As justice minister, Roh named former Prosecutor General Kim Ki Choon, 51. He also named a retired general, Ahn Pil Joon, 59, president of Korea Coal Co., to be health and social affairs minister.
SPORTS
October 3, 1988 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
The closing ceremony was a choreography of Korean culture: Cymbal Dances, Fan Dances, Lantern Dances. A Bridge Created by Magpies. Parting Ships. Complicated affairs with as many 750 costumed dancers at a time, twirling ribbons (from their hats!) and carrying banners, filling the Olympic Stadium floor with color and movement. Yet what do you remember when it is all done? You remember that great global conga line, the entry of athletes. Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, and Qatar in between.
SPORTS
September 16, 1988 | Scott Ostler
In the Olympic press village, two men ride an elevator. One is an American journalist, the other a dorm attendant from the army of young Korean men serving the housing units with unceasing hospitality and good nature. The Korean takes a shot at American small talk. "So, did you collect any good data today?" No data today, pal. We data gatherers of many lands have been fanning out locust-like across Seoul to gather random impressions and mental snapshots.
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the midst of political unrest triggered by police beating a student to death, President Roh Tae Woo's government admitted Wednesday that police had brutally beaten a second protester. Another South Korean, meanwhile, set himself afire--the ninth since April 26--and leaped from a hospital roof condemning Roh's policies. Both of the protesters were reported in critical condition.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FATHER: Chi Ki Hong, 50, executive director of Unix Electronics, a small appliance manufacturing firm. MOTHER: Kim Yong Ho, 45, a homemaker who hopes to return to the work force. (All Korean wives retain their maiden names.) CHILDREN: Son Chi Jong Eun, 20, a college freshman majoring in German literature and hoping to become a television producer. Son Chi Chang Eun, 18, a high school senior and the center of his family's life as he prepares for college entrance exams.
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