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NEWS
April 21, 1987
Vern R. Huck, a building contractor who for 10 years served on three separate city commissions during the administration of Mayor Sam Yorty, died Wednesday in a Glendale hospital. The former parking, public utilities and transportation and building and safety commissioner was 76. Huck, who also headed the Los Angeles Spastic Children's Foundation for many years, entered the construction industry here in 1932. In 1955 he was chosen Builder of the Year by the Building Contractors Assn.
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SPORTS
August 13, 2012 | By K.C. Johnson
LONDON - They used words like "passion" and "embrace" and emphasized the tagline "a city leaps forward. " But Leonardo Gryner, chief executive of Rio de Janeiro's organizing committee, perhaps put it best when he offered a hint of what to expect at the 2016 Olympics in the Carnival City. "In Brazil, as you know, we like to party," Gryner said at a news conference. Rio received the Olympic flag at the closing ceremony for the London Games on Sunday night, unveiling 250 dancers and musicians in an eight-minute ceremony that officials said was designed to showcase the city's "multicultural embrace.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1998
This whole Valley secession thing bothers the heck out of me. Is there a hidden agenda here--something I haven't been told? I've yet to be given one logical reason for a separation from Greater Los Angeles. Where is the tax base to come from that will provide Val-leyites with a better life as a separate city? On the same page as your Valley secession article was an article on the increase in Los Angeles Unified School District enrollment, much of it the children of recent immigrants living in the northern part of the Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2006 | Mai Tran, Times Staff Writer
A city manager under investigation for allegedly altering documents has reached an agreement with Westminster officials prohibiting her from entering City Hall but allowing her to work from home until she retires in November. Mary Evangeline Schock, 54, of Yorba Linda, who had been city manager for nearly two years, was placed on administrative leave in April during a 30-day internal investigation.
OPINION
May 1, 2002
Re "Vote for Secession Won't Split Up L.A. Unified," April 29: In your article many San Fernando Valley residents were disappointed, as I was, to learn that the break of the San Fernando Valley from L.A. would not include a break from the LAUSD. But isn't it really first necessary to get our Valley out of downtown L.A. so we can then work on getting our schools out of the district? First a separate city for the Valley with local control--then a break from the LAUSD would likely be obtainable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1997
The Times' Feb. 23 editorial "Secession Merits a Citywide Vote" urges elimination of the City Council's ability to veto the Valley becoming a separate city. However, The Times wants to impose a citywide vote on the question--in addition to the vote of Valley residents. There are two reasons The Times' position is wrong and harmful. First, a citywide vote is not needed to protect residents of the areas that will remain as Los Angeles. State law already provides that any division of the city can only take place if it is economically feasible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
Implications of the San Fernando Valley's possible secession from Los Angeles will be assessed in a symposium Thursday at Cal State Northridge. The event, sponsored by CSUN's Center for Southern California Studies, will focus on the economics of operating a separate city, the tax base, employment and business trends, planning, land use and other issues, said Matthew Cahn, director of the center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1994
It was very gratifying to read in The Times about Councilman Marvin Braude's tireless efforts to maintain the appearance and the quality of the buildings, stores and signs on San Vicente Boulevard in Brentwood. Unfortunately, the councilman's zeal does not extend to another part of his constituency--Ventura Boulevard in Encino. Apparently, he is not offended by Adray's architecture or signing. And the building of a Burger King on Ventura Boulevard likewise hasn't troubled him a bit. Mr. Braude lives in Pacific Palisades, not the Valley, and his primary interests are on the other side of the hill.
OPINION
June 2, 2002
Since I can see no practical difference between a Valley city of well over 1 million and L.A. as it now exists, I can only speculate that the people driving this issue intend to make personal gains if the split is voted in. If it's reasonable for the Valley to pull out of L.A., then it's equally reasonable for the West Valley to remove itself from the proposed Valley city. I suggest that those of us in the more affluent west--bounded by Mulholland Drive on the south, the mountains on the north and the 405 Freeway on the east--form our own ridiculous, separate city.
NEWS
March 16, 1985 | JAMES RAINEY, Times Staff Writer
There appears to be "no justification" for the formation of a city in Marina del Rey, according to a report that also estimated such a city would lose almost $2 million in its first year of operation. The report, by the director of the Los Angeles County Local Agency Formation Commission, was a setback to cityhood proponents. It is expected to be regarded as significant when the commission decides on the question of incorporation.
OPINION
August 16, 2002 | PAT McOSKER, Pat McOsker is a Los Angeles Fire Department firefighter and chairman of the Secession Task Force of the United Firefighters of Los Angeles City.
We are safer if we stick together. The United Firefighters of Los Angeles City studied the possible public safety effects of San Fernando Valley secession. We discussed the issues with hundreds of front-line firefighters and paramedics, met with command staff chiefs, pored over every available document relating to secession and studied countless other documents detailing the L.A. Fire Department's current capabilities and levels of service.
OPINION
June 2, 2002
Since I can see no practical difference between a Valley city of well over 1 million and L.A. as it now exists, I can only speculate that the people driving this issue intend to make personal gains if the split is voted in. If it's reasonable for the Valley to pull out of L.A., then it's equally reasonable for the West Valley to remove itself from the proposed Valley city. I suggest that those of us in the more affluent west--bounded by Mulholland Drive on the south, the mountains on the north and the 405 Freeway on the east--form our own ridiculous, separate city.
OPINION
May 1, 2002
Re "Vote for Secession Won't Split Up L.A. Unified," April 29: In your article many San Fernando Valley residents were disappointed, as I was, to learn that the break of the San Fernando Valley from L.A. would not include a break from the LAUSD. But isn't it really first necessary to get our Valley out of downtown L.A. so we can then work on getting our schools out of the district? First a separate city for the Valley with local control--then a break from the LAUSD would likely be obtainable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Advocates of Hollywood secession from Los Angeles released a study Monday saying their proposed city would generate more than enough taxes to sustain itself, but prospects for a referendum on cityhood remained uncertain. The report by the Hollywood VOTE secession group found the proposed city of 265,000 people would produce $146 million in revenue each year and run annual surpluses as high as $39 million. "I'm on cloud nine," said nightclub owner Gene La Pietra, the founder of Hollywood VOTE.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the objections of San Fernando Valley secessionists, a panel of city lawmakers Tuesday approved a report questioning the value and costs of a breakup of the city of Los Angeles. The report, prepared by city officials, is intended for use by the Local Agency Formation Commission, the group weighing whether to allow voters to decide the issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Challenging a study that found a new harbor-area city would operate in the red, a secession group released a revised plan Saturday that it believes would balance the books and provide better service to San Pedro and Wilmington. The plan by the Harbor Study Foundation provides the most detailed proposal yet for dividing up assets and creating a structure for a new municipality to serve 179,000 residents of the harbor area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1986 | JANET CLAYTON, Times Staff Writer
Citing examples of how the Los Angeles city attorney must advise city officials on one hand and then prosecute them if they violate the law, Los Angeles City Councilman Ernani Bernardi Tuesday proposed that the city attorney's office be split into two branches. "An inherent conflict of interest lies in the city attorney's dual role," Bernardi said in a motion made to the City Council.
NEWS
April 11, 1985 | LARRY GORDON, Times Staff Writer
When some people talk about the neighborhoods in Glendale below Colorado Street, they are very careful about the geographic adjective they use. After all, delicate sensibilities can be offended by the use of the word "south" instead of "southern." The point is small, but important, residents say. To say "South Glendale" may give the impression of a separate city, of a world inherently different from the more affluent and powerful neighborhoods to the north.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN PATRICK McGREEVY and SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The San Fernando Valley could survive as a robust independent city, but would need to pay at least $68 million a year in "alimony" to the rest of Los Angeles to achieve the breakup, according to a landmark report released Wednesday. The "strong and diverse tax base" of Encino, Northridge, Studio City and the rest of the Valley would produce enough revenue--more than $1 billion a year--to cover all city functions, pay the alimony and still leave a surplus, the study found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2000 | JOE MATHEWS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is a calculating political consultant. She is a straight-talking cop. He's an old-school liberal. She is a law-and-order moderate. He holds a seat on the elected school board. She has never run for office. She is planning a run for City Council next spring in Carson. He is planning a run for City Council next spring in Compton. What could they have in common? Basil and Jenny Kimbrew are married. "You could call us the Bill and Hillary Clinton of L.A. County," he says, half-jokingly. Perhaps.
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