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Separation Of Church

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1996 | JOHN POPE
A church that was relocated to temporary facilities a decade ago by the city, sparking a lawsuit involving the constitutional separation of church and state, has received approval to build a permanent home. The City Council's action allows the International Church of the Foursquare Gospel to build a sanctuary, child-care facility and nine apartments on 1.3 acres at North Brea Boulevard and Ash Street. "I've been looking forward to this moment for 9 1/2 years," said the Rev.
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NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Michael McGough
Religious conservatives in the United States  have been complaining that developments in the political arena - the Obamcare contraceptive mandate, the progress of same-sex civil marriage - threaten religious freedom. They're crying wolf, but similar alarums in the Mother Country make a bit more sense.  Because England has an established church, some of whose bishops sit in Parliament, the political question of same-sex marriage has religious reverberations that  don't sound here.
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NEWS
December 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
Two Muslim girls whose insistence on wearing Islamic scarfs to school kicked off a national debate announced Saturday that they will take off the controversial headgear in class. The 13- and 14-year-old sisters, Fatima and Leila Achaboun, said they would bow to the request by their principal at Gabriel Havez College in the northern Paris suburb of Creil and take off their scarfs. They gave no explanation of their decision to lower the hijabs to their shoulders while in the classroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
After receiving a complaint from an atheists' organization, Marine brass at Camp Pendleton are reviewing whether to permit a cross atop a hill on the base to remain. The 13-foot cross was erected on Veterans Day as a memorial to four Marines killed in combat in Iraq and to veterans in general. Three of the four dead Marines had been part of a group that had erected a cross on the same spot in 2003 before deploying to Iraq. That cross was destroyed by a brush fire in 2007. After an article about the new cross appeared in The Times, the Military Assn.
OPINION
August 18, 1985
The Times has no business attacking Education Secretary William Bennett for his valid criticisms of the Supreme Court's recent church-state decisions. The so-called "constitutional separation of church and state" has as its sole constitutional basis the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, which prohibits only the establishment of a national church. The "case" for any broader prohibition has been totally destroyed by constitutional scholars such as Robert Cord. It is clearly the Times, not Mr. Bennett, that needs homework on this subject, by studying some historical facts, not disproven ideological cliches.
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Michael McGough
Religious conservatives in the United States  have been complaining that developments in the political arena - the Obamcare contraceptive mandate, the progress of same-sex civil marriage - threaten religious freedom. They're crying wolf, but similar alarums in the Mother Country make a bit more sense.  Because England has an established church, some of whose bishops sit in Parliament, the political question of same-sex marriage has religious reverberations that  don't sound here.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
The House took a break from battles over economic policy Tuesday and returned to the culture war. With overwhelming bipartisan support, the Republican-led chamber voted to reaffirm "In God We Trust" as the official U.S. motto and encourage its display in all public schools and buildings. The nonbinding resolution inevitably reopened a debate over separation of church and state — the sort of social issue that has taken a back seat this year to the debt ceiling, budget deficit and flagging economy.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Obama administration upset liberals as well as the president's two Supreme Court appointees Wednesday by arguing that taxpayers had no right to sue the government if it used tax money to fund religious schools. The surprising argument came in this term's most important church-state dispute. At issue is the constitutionality of an unusual 13-year-old Arizona law that gives individuals dollar-for-dollar tax credits up to $500 for contributions to private organizations, which in turn allows taxpayers to direct a $500 tax credit to a private organization, which in turn pays tuition for students in private schools.
OPINION
May 29, 2010
The United States has a long tradition of allowing tax breaks for charitable contributions, including donations to churches and other religious organizations. But the San Francisco-based U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has concluded that a program that offers tax credits for contributions to provide scholarships for private schools breaches the wall separating church and state. It's a tortured decision that the Supreme Court rightly has agreed to review. For 13 years Arizona has offered a tax credit — up to $500 for individuals and $1,000 to married couples — for contributions to so-called school tuition organizations that provide scholarships to private schools so long as they don't discriminate on the basis of race, color, handicap, familial status or national origin.
OPINION
May 9, 2010
Should church and state ever meet? Re "Power and prayer," Editorial, May 2 The obsession with securing the ideal of "separation of church and state" has been carried too far, to the point of risking a serious misinterpretation of what our Founding Fathers meant by this phrase. The issue has been confused to the point where upholding traditional moral or ethical standards in any public forum is seen by some as the establishment of religion. Many teachers in our schools now hesitate to inform students about key values of the major faiths, such as those implicit in the Ten Commandments and the Torah, which for the most part are universal to civilized humankind and transcend sectarian identity or theism itself.
NATIONAL
April 29, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
The Supreme Court gave its approval Wednesday to displaying a cross on public land to honor fallen soldiers, saying the Constitution "does not require the eradication of all religious symbols in the public realm." Speaking for a divided court, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy said the 1st Amendment called for a middle-ground "policy of accommodation" toward religious displays on public land, not a strict separation of church and state. Kennedy disagreed with judges in California who said U.S. National Park Service officials must remove a small Latin cross from the Mojave National Preserve that had stood since 1934 to honor soldiers who died in World War I. The judges said the display of the cross on public land amounted to a government endorsement of religion.
OPINION
March 15, 2010
Roberts' rules Re "Chief justice sees reason to shun State of Union event," March 10 Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. is concerned about the criticism, during the State of the Union address, of the Supreme Court's decision allowing an even greater intrusion of corporate money into our electoral process. So concerned, Roberts says, that justices should perhaps not attend the speech in the future. Well, la-di-da. I am concerned that we appear to have a Supreme Court that, far from being sobered or chastened by its weighty responsibilities to uphold the Constitution of the United States, appears to have allowed ego, hubris and a distinctly pro-corporate bias to derail common sense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz
On a recent Sunday morning in the Crystal Cathedral, Sheila Schuller Coleman, its co-leader, offered a sermon about the necessity of rising above turbulence in the storms of life. It is familiar ground for the Garden Grove megachurch, which is in the midst of its own financial turmoil. The church, founded by Robert H. Schuller in the 1950s, announced in late January that it is laying off dozens of employees, selling a 170-acre retreat, pulling its "Hour of Power" television show from seven stations and canceling its annual Glory of Easter pageant.
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