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Separation Of Church And State

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1998 | From Religion News Service
Barry Lynn likes Nativity scenes. "I like going by churches that have fancy Nativity scenes and live Nativity scenes," Lynn said. "It's a neat thing. I've been known to stop the car and say, 'Whoa, let's look at that Nativity scene.' But I don't want Nativity scenes on the courthouse lawn."
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NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Michael McGough
Religious conservatives in the United States  have been complaining that developments in the political arena - the Obamcare contraceptive mandate, the progress of same-sex civil marriage - threaten religious freedom. They're crying wolf, but similar alarums in the Mother Country make a bit more sense.  Because England has an established church, some of whose bishops sit in Parliament, the political question of same-sex marriage has religious reverberations that  don't sound here.
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NEWS
April 6, 1990 | DAN BALZ, THE WASHINGTON POST
The National Conference of Catholic Bishops, stung by the success of abortion-rights groups, has retained the Hill & Knowlton public relations firm and former President Ronald Reagan's pollsters to help design a counteroffensive that the bishops hope will shift the debate and alter the political climate on the issue. The decision marks the first time that the bishops have sought such help in waging a public-policy debate, one official said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
After receiving a complaint from an atheists' organization, Marine brass at Camp Pendleton are reviewing whether to permit a cross atop a hill on the base to remain. The 13-foot cross was erected on Veterans Day as a memorial to four Marines killed in combat in Iraq and to veterans in general. Three of the four dead Marines had been part of a group that had erected a cross on the same spot in 2003 before deploying to Iraq. That cross was destroyed by a brush fire in 2007. After an article about the new cross appeared in The Times, the Military Assn.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Albert C. Walker is an avid hiker but he carefully avoids the eucalyptus-lined trails of nearby Mt. Davidson Park. And while he can admire the view of the park from his dining room, he prefers to sit with his back to the window. The reason: a 103-foot concrete-and-steel cross that towers over the city-owned, 31-acre park atop the highest peak in San Francisco, visible for miles and believed to be the largest of its kind in the nation.
NEWS
March 22, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of this city's embattled school board lashed out Monday at its conservative Christian majority, threatening a lawsuit over its decision last week to adopt a controversial sex education program that may be in violation of state law. "I expect a legal challenge to this," said Mark Salo, director of Planned Parenthood of San Diego and Riverside counties. "It appears to me that the board acted in violation of the law."
NEWS
April 13, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's springtime, when a high school senior's thoughts turn to the prom, summer vacation and the collegiate adventure just around the corner. But in this town--and an increasing number like it across Texas--many students are taking on weightier matters and find themselves at Ground Zero in a growing controversy over prayer in the public schools. When three seniors at a public high school here proposed that a prayer be read at their graduation ceremony last year, their idea was put to a vote.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
Setting the stage for a possible Supreme Court ruling on the separation of church and state, a federal appeals court Monday declared Cleveland's school voucher program unconstitutional because it uses tax money to send students to religious schools. In a 2-1 ruling, the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals said the program appears designed to favor religious schools and thereby violates the constitutional separation of church and state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2006 | From Times Staff Reports
A state appeals court Thursday overturned a lower court ruling that had voided a 2005 ballot measure in which the city-owned land beneath the controversial Mt. Soledad cross was deeded to the federal government. A trial judge had said the measure, approved by 76% of voters, was an improper attempt to sidestep a federal judge's ruling that the cross violated constitutional separation of church and state.
NATIONAL
November 19, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge ruled that a Ten Commandments monument installed in Alabama's judicial building by the state's chief justice must be removed because it violates the separation of church and state. "Its sloping top and the religious air of the tablets unequivocally call to mind an open Bible resting on a podium," U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson said. Chief Justice Roy Moore's attorney said the chief justice would appeal.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
The House took a break from battles over economic policy Tuesday and returned to the culture war. With overwhelming bipartisan support, the Republican-led chamber voted to reaffirm "In God We Trust" as the official U.S. motto and encourage its display in all public schools and buildings. The nonbinding resolution inevitably reopened a debate over separation of church and state — the sort of social issue that has taken a back seat this year to the debt ceiling, budget deficit and flagging economy.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Obama administration upset liberals as well as the president's two Supreme Court appointees Wednesday by arguing that taxpayers had no right to sue the government if it used tax money to fund religious schools. The surprising argument came in this term's most important church-state dispute. At issue is the constitutionality of an unusual 13-year-old Arizona law that gives individuals dollar-for-dollar tax credits up to $500 for contributions to private organizations, which in turn allows taxpayers to direct a $500 tax credit to a private organization, which in turn pays tuition for students in private schools.
OPINION
May 29, 2010
The United States has a long tradition of allowing tax breaks for charitable contributions, including donations to churches and other religious organizations. But the San Francisco-based U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has concluded that a program that offers tax credits for contributions to provide scholarships for private schools breaches the wall separating church and state. It's a tortured decision that the Supreme Court rightly has agreed to review. For 13 years Arizona has offered a tax credit — up to $500 for individuals and $1,000 to married couples — for contributions to so-called school tuition organizations that provide scholarships to private schools so long as they don't discriminate on the basis of race, color, handicap, familial status or national origin.
OPINION
May 9, 2010
Should church and state ever meet? Re "Power and prayer," Editorial, May 2 The obsession with securing the ideal of "separation of church and state" has been carried too far, to the point of risking a serious misinterpretation of what our Founding Fathers meant by this phrase. The issue has been confused to the point where upholding traditional moral or ethical standards in any public forum is seen by some as the establishment of religion. Many teachers in our schools now hesitate to inform students about key values of the major faiths, such as those implicit in the Ten Commandments and the Torah, which for the most part are universal to civilized humankind and transcend sectarian identity or theism itself.
NATIONAL
April 29, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
The Supreme Court gave its approval Wednesday to displaying a cross on public land to honor fallen soldiers, saying the Constitution "does not require the eradication of all religious symbols in the public realm." Speaking for a divided court, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy said the 1st Amendment called for a middle-ground "policy of accommodation" toward religious displays on public land, not a strict separation of church and state. Kennedy disagreed with judges in California who said U.S. National Park Service officials must remove a small Latin cross from the Mojave National Preserve that had stood since 1934 to honor soldiers who died in World War I. The judges said the display of the cross on public land amounted to a government endorsement of religion.
OPINION
March 15, 2010
Roberts' rules Re "Chief justice sees reason to shun State of Union event," March 10 Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. is concerned about the criticism, during the State of the Union address, of the Supreme Court's decision allowing an even greater intrusion of corporate money into our electoral process. So concerned, Roberts says, that justices should perhaps not attend the speech in the future. Well, la-di-da. I am concerned that we appear to have a Supreme Court that, far from being sobered or chastened by its weighty responsibilities to uphold the Constitution of the United States, appears to have allowed ego, hubris and a distinctly pro-corporate bias to derail common sense.
NEWS
May 17, 1988
Court-appointed PTL trustee David Clark filed a new bankruptcy reorganization plan, one that would sell off nearly all assets and make him the head of the bankrupt television ministry. Disgraced founder Jim Bakker expressed immediate outrage, saying the proposal is a power grab and violates the constitutional principle of separation of church and state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2010 | By Ann M. Simmons
A proposal to open the first Hebrew language charter school in the state will be considered Wednesday by school trustees in the Santa Clarita Valley, some of whom have raised concerns that the institution would violate separation of church and state. Backers of the proposed school, to be called the Albert Einstein Academy for Letters, Arts and Sciences, say such worries are unfounded and that the campus would not have a religious base and would not have a relationship with a synagogue.
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