Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSeparation Of Power
IN THE NEWS

Separation Of Power

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
State Sen. John Garamendi, the Democratic nominee for insurance commissioner, has called for legislation to remove the Insurance Department from the governor's control. Garamendi said that because Proposition 103 has made the insurance commissioner's post elective , it should no longer have to report to the governor and the governor's secretary of business, transportation and housing, as under current law.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 10, 2011 | By David K. Shipler
The system of military commissions that will try Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and four other alleged 9/11 plotters contains a dirty little secret. Hardly anybody talks about it, but it's a key reason for concern as the apparatus becomes established. It is this: The commissions can operate inside the United States, and they have jurisdiction over a broad range of crimes. Nothing in the Military Commissions Act limits the military trials to Guantanamo detainees, or to people captured and held abroad, or even to terrorism suspects.
Advertisement
OPINION
February 18, 2004
Re "Room on Board," editorial, Feb. 16: Your editorial, which advocates expanding the L.A. County Board of Supervisors, points out two flaws in the structure of the Board of Supervisors: the power of the incumbents (true of all elected officials) and the large size of their districts (arguable, whatever the size). The relatively unique and major flaw within county government is that the board exercises both legislative and executive powers. The structural change needed to make county government more manageable and more responsive to the people is to separate the legislative and executive powers.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter and Andrew Zajac, Los Angeles Times
As lawmakers prepare for hearings into the largest egg recall in U.S. history, food safety advocates say the congressional probe could give momentum to a long-delayed measure that would enhance the power of the Food and Drug Administration. If passed, say policymakers, the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act could be the first major step toward streamlining the often unwieldy food safety system. For example, in the U.S. cheese pizza is regulated by one federal agency, but a pepperoni pizza is overseen by another.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2004 | From Associated Press
Excerpts from Tuesday's Supreme Court oral arguments, as transcribed by Alderson Reporting Co.: Solicitor Gen. Theodore B. Olson: This is a case about the separation of powers. The Constitution explicitly commits to the president's discretion the authority to obtain the opinions of subordinates and to formulate recommendations for legislation. Congress may neither intrude on the president's ability to perform these functions nor authorize private litigants to use the courts to do so....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1997
The separation of powers between executive and legislative branches defines democratic government, and Monday it came to Mexico in a new and uncharted era. The president delivered his State of the Union speech to a Congress in which no party holds a majority. And for the first time ever, a member of the opposition rose in response.
NEWS
April 8, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
It was a neat solution to a persistent political problem. Perhaps too neat. Conservatives had long complained that some judges were too soft on criminals. Liberals had charged that other judges meted out harsh sentences to street criminals and gentle treatment for white-collar thieves. To remedy those problems, a 1984 compromise between Sens. Strom Thurmond (R-S.C.) and Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.
NEWS
November 29, 2007 | Bruce Ackerman, Bruce Ackerman, a professor of law and political science at Yale, is the author of "Before the Next Attack: Preserving Civil Liberties in an Age of Terrorism."
Despite the show at Annapolis, this week's main diplomatic initiative has concerned Iraq, not Israel. Without any fanfare, the Bush administration and Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki announced that the United States and Iraq will begin negotiating a long-term agreement that will set the terms of Washington's Iraq policy for "coming generations." President Bush is again in legacy mode. His White House "czar" on Iraq, Army Lt. Gen.
NEWS
June 1, 1993 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
"I've watched the Congress, man and boy for 40 years," Lyndon B. Johnson once recalled when he was at the peak of his presidential powers. "And I've never yet seen a Congress that didn't ultimately take the measure of the President it was dealing with." Four months after taking office, President Clinton has already had more trouble with Congress than he bargained for.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2000 | STUART P. JASPER, Stuart P. Jasper is an Irvine lawyer
Gov. Gray Davis recently said judges he appoints should vote his way on death penalty, abortion and gay marriage issues and, if not, resign. That position is an anathema to the separation of powers in government. The governor's later bromide that he supports an independent judiciary was unconvincing because he never recanted the first statement.
NEWS
November 29, 2007 | Bruce Ackerman, Bruce Ackerman, a professor of law and political science at Yale, is the author of "Before the Next Attack: Preserving Civil Liberties in an Age of Terrorism."
Despite the show at Annapolis, this week's main diplomatic initiative has concerned Iraq, not Israel. Without any fanfare, the Bush administration and Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki announced that the United States and Iraq will begin negotiating a long-term agreement that will set the terms of Washington's Iraq policy for "coming generations." President Bush is again in legacy mode. His White House "czar" on Iraq, Army Lt. Gen.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2004 | From Associated Press
Excerpts from Tuesday's Supreme Court oral arguments, as transcribed by Alderson Reporting Co.: Solicitor Gen. Theodore B. Olson: This is a case about the separation of powers. The Constitution explicitly commits to the president's discretion the authority to obtain the opinions of subordinates and to formulate recommendations for legislation. Congress may neither intrude on the president's ability to perform these functions nor authorize private litigants to use the courts to do so....
OPINION
February 18, 2004
Re "Room on Board," editorial, Feb. 16: Your editorial, which advocates expanding the L.A. County Board of Supervisors, points out two flaws in the structure of the Board of Supervisors: the power of the incumbents (true of all elected officials) and the large size of their districts (arguable, whatever the size). The relatively unique and major flaw within county government is that the board exercises both legislative and executive powers. The structural change needed to make county government more manageable and more responsive to the people is to separate the legislative and executive powers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2000 | STUART P. JASPER, Stuart P. Jasper is an Irvine lawyer
Gov. Gray Davis recently said judges he appoints should vote his way on death penalty, abortion and gay marriage issues and, if not, resign. That position is an anathema to the separation of powers in government. The governor's later bromide that he supports an independent judiciary was unconvincing because he never recanted the first statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1997
The separation of powers between executive and legislative branches defines democratic government, and Monday it came to Mexico in a new and uncharted era. The president delivered his State of the Union speech to a Congress in which no party holds a majority. And for the first time ever, a member of the opposition rose in response.
NEWS
June 1, 1993 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
"I've watched the Congress, man and boy for 40 years," Lyndon B. Johnson once recalled when he was at the peak of his presidential powers. "And I've never yet seen a Congress that didn't ultimately take the measure of the President it was dealing with." Four months after taking office, President Clinton has already had more trouble with Congress than he bargained for.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter and Andrew Zajac, Los Angeles Times
As lawmakers prepare for hearings into the largest egg recall in U.S. history, food safety advocates say the congressional probe could give momentum to a long-delayed measure that would enhance the power of the Food and Drug Administration. If passed, say policymakers, the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act could be the first major step toward streamlining the often unwieldy food safety system. For example, in the U.S. cheese pizza is regulated by one federal agency, but a pepperoni pizza is overseen by another.
OPINION
April 10, 2011 | By David K. Shipler
The system of military commissions that will try Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and four other alleged 9/11 plotters contains a dirty little secret. Hardly anybody talks about it, but it's a key reason for concern as the apparatus becomes established. It is this: The commissions can operate inside the United States, and they have jurisdiction over a broad range of crimes. Nothing in the Military Commissions Act limits the military trials to Guantanamo detainees, or to people captured and held abroad, or even to terrorism suspects.
NEWS
July 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
State Sen. John Garamendi, the Democratic nominee for insurance commissioner, has called for legislation to remove the Insurance Department from the governor's control. Garamendi said that because Proposition 103 has made the insurance commissioner's post elective , it should no longer have to report to the governor and the governor's secretary of business, transportation and housing, as under current law.
NEWS
April 8, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
It was a neat solution to a persistent political problem. Perhaps too neat. Conservatives had long complained that some judges were too soft on criminals. Liberals had charged that other judges meted out harsh sentences to street criminals and gentle treatment for white-collar thieves. To remedy those problems, a 1984 compromise between Sens. Strom Thurmond (R-S.C.) and Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|