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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1987
It was heartening to read (July 25) that Spain intends to give Sephardic Jews a "special place in Columbus rites," the upcoming celebration of the 500th anniversary of his discovery of the Americas; 1492 was also the year that Jews were expelled from Spain. A Spanish official said that one intent is to publicize Spain's Jewish past, both at home and abroad. My Sephardic co-religionists in Spain and elsewhere should press the state and the Catholic Church of Spain to use the occasion to memorialize those who died during the Inquisition on flaming stakes rather than be forced to convert to Catholicism.
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WORLD
March 27, 2014 | By Henry Chu and Batsheva Sobelman
TOLEDO, Spain - The Jews who flock to the two medieval synagogues in this walled city are tourists, not worshipers. No one of their faith has practiced it in the temples' exquisitely decorated precincts since 1492. That was the year King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, besides dispatching Christopher Columbus to look for a passage to India, decreed that the Jews of Spain had to either convert to Christianity or quit the country. Many fled - and were robbed, beaten or raped on the way out. Those who stayed faced possible torture and a gruesome death in the Spanish Inquisition.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2011 | By Nomi Morris, Special to the Los Angeles Times
This spring marks 70 years since Nazi Germany invaded what was then Yugoslavia, ultimately deporting and exterminating most of the Sephardic Jewish communities of the Balkans. In Sarajevo, a Muslim woman named Zeyneba Hardaga hid her Jewish friend Josef Kabilo from the Nazis and in 1985 was recognized by Israel as a "Righteous Gentile" whose acts had saved a Jewish life. Fast forward to 1994, the height of the Bosnian Serb siege of Sarajevo, which killed 12,500 of the city's residents over three years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
Rabbi Ovadia Yosef, one of Israel's most influential ultra-Orthodox spiritual leaders who presided over the Shas political party, has died. He was 93. Yosef died Monday at Hadassah Ein Kerem Hospital in Jerusalem. He had been treated in recent weeks for a series of medical conditions, including problems with his back, heart, kidneys and lungs. Strict but pragmatic, the authoritative rabbi held sway over several hundred thousand observant Sephardic Jews, who adhered to his rulings and teachings on marriage, politics and other topics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1987 | ALFREDO GOMEZ, Associated Press
When Queen Isabella sent Christopher Columbus off to sea in 1492, she also expelled Jews from Spain. Now, as the 500th anniversary of Columbus' discovery of America nears, Spain is offering Sephardic Jews around the world a special place in the celebrations. Sepharad is the Hebrew name for Spain. Sephardim are descendants of the people expelled by Queen Isabella, or those who follow Sephardic rites.
NEWS
September 4, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With thousands of mournful supporters cheering him on, one of Israel's most powerful ultra-Orthodox politicians went to prison Sunday and instantly became a martyr for Sephardic Jewry. Aryeh Deri, the charismatic former leader of the Shas Party, began a three-year sentence for bribery and fraud, capping a political and legal drama that has endured for nearly a decade.
NEWS
March 17, 1986 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
It's the only place of its kind west of New Jersey. Cynics might say that this is hardly a notable geographic distinction. But to those who have discovered it, the Sephardic Hebrew Academy in West Hollywood is a religious and cultural oasis on the shores of the Pacific. It is also a place of contrasts. One of the administrators is an elder in a Lutheran church, for instance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1991 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a Westside synagogue last week, scholars and Sephardic Jews remembered the other landmark event of 1492. As everyone knows, Columbus reached the New World in 1492. But that same year, Spain's monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella, also ordered the nation's Jews either to convert to Christianity or to leave the country under pain of death. At least 50,000 Jews--some believe as many as 300,000--were banished from Spain.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | HUGH A. MULLIGAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Five hundred years after the Jews were deported from Spain on the same tide that carried Columbus to the New World, America's oldest synagogue has survived to hear a king and president welcome them back to the Iberian Peninsula. The president, Mario Soares of Portugal, came in person.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1995 | CHARLES HILLINGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This tiny Dutch Caribbean island 35 miles off the coast of Venezuela is the cradle of the Jewish faith in the New World, drawing Jews on pilgrimages from throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico and Central and South America. They come to see the 262-year-old Mikve Israel-Emanuel Synagogue, and worship with descendants of the Jewish families who first moved to this tiny, remote island almost 350 years ago from Holland to establish an agricultural colony called De Hoop (Hope).
WORLD
July 24, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM -- Candidates backed by Israel's ultra-Orthodox community won a hotly contested election Monday to decide who will serve as the nation's next chief rabbis. Rabbi David Lau of Modiin will serve as chief rabbi for the Ashkenazi community and Rabbi Yizthak Yosef, son of prominent Israeli Rabbi Ovadia Yosef, will represent Sephardic Jews. In keeping with custom, each will represent the two main communities of Judaism in Israel. The 10-year term puts each man at the helm of a vast system of state-run religious institutions, responsible for thousands of appointments and jobs.
WORLD
June 23, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM-- Israel's Ashkenazi chief rabbi  suspended himself from part of his duties Sunday amid an investigation into allegations of corruption. Rabbi Yona Metzger's attorneys informed the state ministers of Justice and Religious Services that he would step down from his posts of rabbinical high-court judge and president of the Chief Rabbinate council. He is not, however, stepping down as Ashkenazi chief rabbi, a post he has held for 10 years and which is coming to an end in several weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2013 | By Larry Harnisch, Los Angeles Times
What is the Jewish experience in Los Angeles? "Nobody even thinks about Jews being here or, if they do, maybe they think about Hollywood," said Karen Wilson, guest curator at the Autry National Center. "They might possibly, if they're local, think about Boyle Heights. But there's not a sort of instantly recognizable image. " The question is at the heart of a new exhibit, "Jews in the Los Angeles Mosaic. " It proposes many answers in many voices, speaking in a multitude of tongues.
SCIENCE
August 7, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
North African Jews are more closely related to Jews from other parts of the world than they are to most of their non-Jewish neighbors in North Africa, a study has found. Furthermore, their DNA carries a record of their migrations over the centuries: Some bits trace back to the Middle Eastern peoples thought to have migrated to North Africa more than 2,000 years ago, while other bits are linked to Spanish and Portuguese Jews who fled to North Africa after their expulsion from the Iberian Peninsula in the late 15th century, the study's authors said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2011 | By Nomi Morris, Special to the Los Angeles Times
This spring marks 70 years since Nazi Germany invaded what was then Yugoslavia, ultimately deporting and exterminating most of the Sephardic Jewish communities of the Balkans. In Sarajevo, a Muslim woman named Zeyneba Hardaga hid her Jewish friend Josef Kabilo from the Nazis and in 1985 was recognized by Israel as a "Righteous Gentile" whose acts had saved a Jewish life. Fast forward to 1994, the height of the Bosnian Serb siege of Sarajevo, which killed 12,500 of the city's residents over three years.
FOOD
September 16, 2010 | Phyllis Glazer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's not often that one hears a Jewish person refer to Yom Kippur - the Day of Atonement, marked by repentence and fasting - as their favorite holiday, but for a good friend of mine living in Jaffa, Israel, Yom Kippur is top of the line. "It's almost like the world is on pause," she explains. "The silence is deafening. I don't think there's any other place in the world where everything stops completely just because it's a holiday; no cars on the roads, no planes in the sky, no open stores, no shopping.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli artist Raphael Abecassis remembers how he felt when he began to study the horrendous events that led up to the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492. "When I first read about the subject, I wanted to paint everything in black," said Abecassis, who was in Los Angeles recently for the opening of an expulsion-related show at the Jewish Federation Building.
HEALTH
December 21, 2009 | By Claire Panosian Dunavan
One look at Ani's swollen ankles and we knew she was in trouble. For several years, the petite young mother had been coming to UCLA's FMF Clinic with periodic fevers along with excruciating pain in her chest and abdomen. Now -- as a urine dipstick test confirmed -- her disease was also attacking her kidneys. The 4+ reading for urine protein indicated the organs were beginning to malfunction and leak serum proteins. The loss of circulating protein, in turn, explained the buildup of fluid in her extremities.
WORLD
June 17, 2010 | By Batsheva Sobelman and Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Tens of thousands of ultra-Orthodox Jews protested Thursday against a Supreme Court decision to jail parents who have refused to comply with its order to desegregate a religious girls school. Dressed in black hats and carrying posters denouncing the court as "fascists," the mostly peaceful demonstrators continued their afternoon protest until about 40 parents turned themselves in to police to begin serving two-week sentences for contempt of court, a police spokesman said. The protests, which organizers vowed would continue, marked the latest fissure in relations between Israel's religious and secular communities.
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