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Sepracor Inc

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BUSINESS
June 3, 1999
* The FDA issued a letter to Sepracor Inc. asserting the Marlborough, Mass.-based biotech company had made "unsubstantiated and misleading" safety and efficacy claims about its recently approved asthma drug Xopenex. In a letter dated May 21, a division of the federal agency said the "violative" claims appear in promotional Sepracor materials and "are inconsistent with the approved product labeling of the drug."
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BUSINESS
October 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
Eli Lilly & Co. said Thursday that it is abandoning the development of an enhanced form of the antidepressant drug Prozac after a new evaluation of clinical data. Lilly said it is returning the marketing rights for an enhanced Prozac molecule to Sepracor Inc. Shares in Sepracor lost nearly a third of their value on the news, while Lilly was off slightly. Lilly also reported a 15% rise in profit for the third quarter to $778.
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BUSINESS
December 8, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Eli Lilly & Co., moving to shield Prozac from competition from generic drug makers, said Monday that it struck a deal with Sepracor Inc. for a reformulated version of the blockbuster antidepressant. Sepracor, a small drug firm in Marlborough, Mass., is developing a molecularly altered version of Prozac with one chemical isomer instead of two, possibly reducing potential side effects and qualifying for separate patent protection.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2000 | Associated Press
Eli Lilly & Co. said it won regulatory approval for its licensing agreement with Sepracor Inc. for a new and improved version of the popular antidepressant Prozac. Shares of both companies jumped on the news. Lilly spokesman Ed West said the Federal Trade Commission determined that the licensing agreement can go forward despite concerns raised by a competitor hoping to introduce a generic version of the drug.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2000 | Associated Press
Eli Lilly & Co. said it won regulatory approval for its licensing agreement with Sepracor Inc. for a new and improved version of the popular antidepressant Prozac. Shares of both companies jumped on the news. Lilly spokesman Ed West said the Federal Trade Commission determined that the licensing agreement can go forward despite concerns raised by a competitor hoping to introduce a generic version of the drug.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
Eli Lilly & Co. said Thursday that it is abandoning the development of an enhanced form of the antidepressant drug Prozac after a new evaluation of clinical data. Lilly said it is returning the marketing rights for an enhanced Prozac molecule to Sepracor Inc. Shares in Sepracor lost nearly a third of their value on the news, while Lilly was off slightly. Lilly also reported a 15% rise in profit for the third quarter to $778.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Sanofi-Aventis said U.S. regulators approved a long-acting version of sleep aid Ambien, which loses patent protection next year. The Food and Drug Administration approved Ambien CR for use in helping people both fall and stay asleep, Paris-based Sanofi said. The approval in both uses may help Sanofi protect Ambien sales from competition by Lunesta, introduced earlier this year by Sepracor Inc.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
New Version of Seldane OKd: Hay fever sufferers who abandoned the popular antihistamine because of potentially deadly side effects will soon be able to buy a new, safer version. The Food and Drug Administration approved the new version--to be called Allegra--a decision that could shake up the highly competitive, $1-billion market for allergy drugs. The approval prompted shares of Marlborough, Mass.-based Sepracor Inc., which originated the product, to soar while Madison, N.J.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1995 | From Associated Press
Sepracor Inc. is researching the removal of molecules that cause side effects in some of medicine's best-known drugs. Some of the company's most promising prospects, including the drug's brand name, generic name, purpose, side effects being removed and stage of development: Seldane: Terfenadine; non-sedating allergy pill; heart arrhythmia; patent issued, in final tests on people; launch target 1997.
NEWS
June 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
The newly appointed editor of the New England Journal of Medicine is pledging to divest any interest he has in pharmaceutical companies in an effort to avoid conflicts of interest. Dr. Jeffrey Drazen also said he might have made a mistake last year when he heaped praise on an asthma drug that was made by a company he was working for as a paid consultant. "We were probably a little overzealous," Drazen told the Boston Herald on Tuesday. "In the future, we'll be more careful."
BUSINESS
June 3, 1999
* The FDA issued a letter to Sepracor Inc. asserting the Marlborough, Mass.-based biotech company had made "unsubstantiated and misleading" safety and efficacy claims about its recently approved asthma drug Xopenex. In a letter dated May 21, a division of the federal agency said the "violative" claims appear in promotional Sepracor materials and "are inconsistent with the approved product labeling of the drug."
BUSINESS
December 8, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Eli Lilly & Co., moving to shield Prozac from competition from generic drug makers, said Monday that it struck a deal with Sepracor Inc. for a reformulated version of the blockbuster antidepressant. Sepracor, a small drug firm in Marlborough, Mass., is developing a molecularly altered version of Prozac with one chemical isomer instead of two, possibly reducing potential side effects and qualifying for separate patent protection.
HEALTH
January 17, 2005 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
The nation's insomniacs will need only to turn on late-night television in the next several months to learn there's a new kid on the block in the $2-billion market for sleep drugs. In mid-December, the Food and Drug Administration approved a new prescription sleep aid -- a hypnotic, in medical parlance -- called eszopiclone.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2001 | From Reuters and Times Staff
Health-care stocks will become more of a force in the Nasdaq 100 when the benchmark index--often considered a proxy for the technology sector--is shuffled next week. Of the 13 stocks to be added to the index next Monday, eight are health-care and biotechnology issues, including ImClone Systems Inc., Sepracor Inc., Invitrogen Corp. and Cephalon Inc. All 13 of the stocks to be dropped during the index's annual rebalancing are technology issues--some of them household names of the '90s dot-com boom such as Inktomi Corp.
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