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September 11

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2011 | By Daniel Maclaine
The little boy held tightly to his grandfather's hand as they walked slowly along the city street. "Where are we going, Papa?" he asked, craning his neck to look up at the old man's face. "Ah," the grandfather said, stopping and bending at his waist. "You are so curious about where we are going that you forget to see what's around you. " The old man's eyes twinkled as he winked at his grandson. The boy felt safe and loved when he was with his grandfather. In the old man's eyes, he saw secrets that were so special and wonderful that it made him feel lucky to share them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, firefighters from Engine 54, Ladder 4 and Battalion 9 responded to the call that the World Trade Center had been attacked. None survived. In the following days, a 10 1/2-foot Statue of Liberty replica was mysteriously placed among the flowers and items of commemoration around the firehouse on 8th Avenue and 49th street. Soon Lady Liberty was covered in hundreds of memorial tokens including origami cranes, flags and badges from around the world, children's drawings and photos of the fallen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1999
Movies The supernatural thriller "Stigmata" stars Patricia Arquette as a seemingly ordinary young woman overcome by a mysterious powerful force. Gabriel Byrne and Jonathan Pryce co-star, and Rupert Wainwright directed. It opens Friday in general release. "Best Laid Plans," a thriller that explores the unexpected consequences of life-altering decisions, stars Allessandro Nivola, Reese Witherspoon and Josh Brolin as three young people testing the limits of their morality.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
There's no easy way to talk with children about disasters. Parents and teachers can omit the disturbing details, but eventually the truth comes out. So how do we introduce kids to this kind of information? That's the question Lauren Tarshis seeks to answer with "I Survived" - a historical fiction series for middle-grade readers. The sixth book, which has just been published, is "I Survived the Attacks ofSeptember 11, 2001" (Scholastic: 112 pp., $4.99 paper). Tarshis was reluctant to write about9/11.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1997 | From Reuters
The shadow of Asia's economic woes fell across U.S. trade prospects Thursday as the Commerce Department reported that the monthly deficit unexpectedly shot up to an eight-month high of $11.07 billion in September. Clinton administration officials expressed concern that cheaper Asian currencies would aggravate trade imbalances by fostering more imports and making it harder for American companies to sell manufactured goods in the region.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Not long after 9/11, a French producer named Alain Brigand asked 11 very different directors from across the world to make short films about the catastrophe. Some of Brigand's choices were real head-scratchers: No matter how great Sean Penn can be as an actor, as a director he has too leaden a touch for a subject so heavily freighted.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2011 | Christopher Hawthorne and ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
If you were hoping that the National September 11 Memorial might turn out to be a visionary or uncompromising monument to human tragedy and architectural destruction, you probably haven't been paying sustained attention to the process that created it. And who could blame you? The rebuilding effort at the World Trade Center site has been marked by enough grandstanding, backbiting and power grabs, among politicians and designers alike, to push even the most dedicated optimist toward utter cynicism.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, firefighters from Engine 54, Ladder 4 and Battalion 9 responded to the call that the World Trade Center had been attacked. None survived. In the following days, a 10 1/2-foot Statue of Liberty replica was mysteriously placed among the flowers and items of commemoration around the firehouse on 8th Avenue and 49th street. Soon Lady Liberty was covered in hundreds of memorial tokens including origami cranes, flags and badges from around the world, children's drawings and photos of the fallen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
There's no easy way to talk with children about disasters. Parents and teachers can omit the disturbing details, but eventually the truth comes out. So how do we introduce kids to this kind of information? That's the question Lauren Tarshis seeks to answer with "I Survived" - a historical fiction series for middle-grade readers. The sixth book, which has just been published, is "I Survived the Attacks ofSeptember 11, 2001" (Scholastic: 112 pp., $4.99 paper). Tarshis was reluctant to write about9/11.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2011 | James Rainey
Days of tributes and memorials to the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11 may have taken their toll, a surplus of sadness pooling like the waterfalls at the new New York memorial. At least most of the stories showed a merciful precision. Most in the media heaped praise on the right figures -- the Goldman Sachs official who died helping co-workers to safety, the firefighter who led a perilous rescue. That restraint didn't extend, unfortunately, to one media giant's communications. In a video memorializing its $5-million contribution to the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, the Walt Disney Co. put the focus squarely on that unknown 9/11 hero, CEO Robert Iger.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2011 | James Rainey
Days of tributes and memorials to the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11 may have taken their toll, a surplus of sadness pooling like the waterfalls at the new New York memorial. At least most of the stories showed a merciful precision. Most in the media heaped praise on the right figures -- the Goldman Sachs official who died helping co-workers to safety, the firefighter who led a perilous rescue. That restraint didn't extend, unfortunately, to one media giant's communications. In a video memorializing its $5-million contribution to the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, the Walt Disney Co. put the focus squarely on that unknown 9/11 hero, CEO Robert Iger.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2011 | By Daniel Maclaine
The little boy held tightly to his grandfather's hand as they walked slowly along the city street. "Where are we going, Papa?" he asked, craning his neck to look up at the old man's face. "Ah," the grandfather said, stopping and bending at his waist. "You are so curious about where we are going that you forget to see what's around you. " The old man's eyes twinkled as he winked at his grandson. The boy felt safe and loved when he was with his grandfather. In the old man's eyes, he saw secrets that were so special and wonderful that it made him feel lucky to share them.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2011 | Christopher Hawthorne and ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
If you were hoping that the National September 11 Memorial might turn out to be a visionary or uncompromising monument to human tragedy and architectural destruction, you probably haven't been paying sustained attention to the process that created it. And who could blame you? The rebuilding effort at the World Trade Center site has been marked by enough grandstanding, backbiting and power grabs, among politicians and designers alike, to push even the most dedicated optimist toward utter cynicism.
BOOKS
July 18, 2004 | Jacob Heilbrunn, Jacob Heilbrunn is a Los Angeles Times editorial writer and author of a forthcoming book on the history of neoconservatism.
Collections of newspaper essays, let alone op-eds, are usually dreary affairs. What was dashed off for a provocative read over breakfast becomes, more often than not, a prolonged exercise in tedium by the time it is immured between hard covers. William Pfaff's "Fear, Anger and Failure" is a notable exception. A longtime columnist for the International Herald Tribune, Pfaff has lived for decades in Paris, where he has followed the turbulent relationship between Europe and the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Not long after 9/11, a French producer named Alain Brigand asked 11 very different directors from across the world to make short films about the catastrophe. Some of Brigand's choices were real head-scratchers: No matter how great Sean Penn can be as an actor, as a director he has too leaden a touch for a subject so heavily freighted.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1999
Movies The supernatural thriller "Stigmata" stars Patricia Arquette as a seemingly ordinary young woman overcome by a mysterious powerful force. Gabriel Byrne and Jonathan Pryce co-star, and Rupert Wainwright directed. It opens Friday in general release. "Best Laid Plans," a thriller that explores the unexpected consequences of life-altering decisions, stars Allessandro Nivola, Reese Witherspoon and Josh Brolin as three young people testing the limits of their morality.
BOOKS
July 18, 2004 | Jacob Heilbrunn, Jacob Heilbrunn is a Los Angeles Times editorial writer and author of a forthcoming book on the history of neoconservatism.
Collections of newspaper essays, let alone op-eds, are usually dreary affairs. What was dashed off for a provocative read over breakfast becomes, more often than not, a prolonged exercise in tedium by the time it is immured between hard covers. William Pfaff's "Fear, Anger and Failure" is a notable exception. A longtime columnist for the International Herald Tribune, Pfaff has lived for decades in Paris, where he has followed the turbulent relationship between Europe and the United States.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2001 | Matea Gold and Maggie Farley, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
In the worst terrorist attack ever against the United States, hijackers struck at the preeminent symbols of the nation's wealth and might Tuesday, flying airliners into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon and killing or injuring thousands of people. As a horrified nation watched on television, the twin towers of the World Trade Center in lower Manhattan collapsed into flaming rubble after two Boeing 767s rammed their upper stories. A third airliner, a Boeing 757, flattened one of the Pentagon's five sides.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1997 | From Reuters
The shadow of Asia's economic woes fell across U.S. trade prospects Thursday as the Commerce Department reported that the monthly deficit unexpectedly shot up to an eight-month high of $11.07 billion in September. Clinton administration officials expressed concern that cheaper Asian currencies would aggravate trade imbalances by fostering more imports and making it harder for American companies to sell manufactured goods in the region.
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