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September 11 2001 Terrorist Attack

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
The city, local photographers and firefighters will team Sunday for a fund-raiser for the United Way's relief fund that benefits survivors and the families of victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. For $15, families can have photographs taken near a fire engine at an Orange Fire Department station. Those participating will receive a 5-inch-by-7-inch color print. The photographs will be taken from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The station is at 176 S. Grand St.
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NEWS
November 23, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Washington lawyer Kenneth Feinberg has emerged as a leading candidate to oversee a compensation fund for victims of the Sept. 11 attacks and their families, sources said. Congress created the fund as a speedy way for victims to get money for lost wages and emotional damages stemming from the terrorist attacks. Fund applicants will not have to prove fault but will forgo the chance to collect potentially greater payouts by suing in a federal court.
NEWS
November 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The American Red Cross knowingly collected hundreds of thousands of blood donations after Sept. 11 that could not be used for victims of the terrorist attacks. After selling some of the surplus to hospitals, the Red Cross has begun to destroy thousands of pints that have outlasted their shelf life. The charitable outpouring offered an opportunity for the $2.5-billion-a-year organization to restock its depleted blood inventory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2001 | TIMOTHY HUGHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rabbi John Sherwood uses phrases like "knocking down walls" and "building bridges" when asked about a pair of panel discussions he has organized to gauge the spiritual fallout in Ventura County after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. But the native New Yorker with the rapid-fire delivery is also savvy. Any discussion of religion in the wake of the attacks better be more than platitudes and cliches about harmony, peace, love and understanding, said Sherwood, of Oxnard.
NEWS
October 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Tests of air, dust and water in and around the World Trade Center site have uncovered no major risks to people's health, government agencies said Wednesday. "Our data show that contaminant levels are low or nonexistent and are generally confined to the Trade Center site," Christie Todd Whitman, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, said in a statement. Metal levels in water runoff were higher than normal but not perilous, officials said.
NEWS
October 4, 2001 | MARISA SCHULTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The risk of human rights abuses worldwide has increased markedly since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, according to an Amnesty International report released Wednesday. Hate crimes and civil rights violations--particularly against Muslims and people of Middle Eastern background--have been reported from Australia to Poland to India, as well as in the United States, the study found.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2001 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
US Airways Group Inc., hit especially hard by the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks, said Tuesday its third-quarter loss was $766 million, or $11.42 a share, even after getting aid from the airline industry's federal bailout. The loss was far worse than expected on Wall Street. The latest loss compared with a year-earlier loss of $30 million, or 45 cents a share. Revenue at US Airways, the nation's sixth-largest airline, dropped 17% to $2 billion from $2.4 billion. The effect of the Sept.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2001 | Reuters
World airlines saw a drop of 17% in passengers flying scheduled international flights in September and a fall of 9% in freight carried, the global industry body International Air Transport Assn. said. The Geneva-based association said the decline against the same month last year was the largest since immediately after the Gulf War in 1991. The figures confirmed the effects on travel of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the association said.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2001 | Edmund Sanders and Terril Yue Jones and Chris Kraul and Denise Gellene and Marla Dickerson and James F. Peltz and Peter G. Gosselin and Martin Zimmerman
American employers cut more jobs in September than at any time in more than a decade, and that was before the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the Labor Department reported. Businesses reduced payrolls by 199,000, nearly double the consensus forecast of economists. The reductions, coming atop a loss of 84,000 jobs in August, represent the largest monthly job decline since February 1991, in the midst of the last recession.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2001 | By JEANNINE AVERSA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Disruptions and lost business from the terrorist attacks helped to depress manufacturing activity in September for the 12th month in a row, the longest string of declines in industrial production since World War II. The Federal Reserve reported Tuesday that output at the nation's factories, utilities and mines plunged 1% last month, on top of a 0.7% decline in August.
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