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Septic Tanks

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1996 | KAY HWANGBO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Choosing a Site The Los Angeles Department of Public Works on Thursday released a report that identifies the alternative sites for a controversial septic waste collection facility at the Tillman Water Reclamation Plant in Van Nuys, which was built but never opened. The City Council will make the final decision as to where to build one or more facilities, choosing among five scenarios that involve different combinations of the four sites- the Tillman site and the three alternative sites.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1995 | GLORIA GRECO, Gloria Greco is a free-lance writer who lives in Van Nuys
When Mayor Richard Riordan took office, he declared that one of his goals was to run the City of Los Angeles as efficiently as a business. When it comes to sewage treatment, his goal has not been reached. In a cost-cutting move, Riordan has proposed doing away with the court-mandated secondary treatment of the wastes being dumped into the ocean from the Hyperion treatment plant. But a larger issue--who bears the burden of the cost of sewage treatment in Los Angeles--has been largely ignored.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1995 | MAKI BECKER
Homeowners and renters whose septic tanks were damaged in the recent floods may qualify for disaster assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, officials announced Monday. Private wells that were damaged may also be repaired using disaster assistance for those who depend on them to supply water. To apply for assistance, call (800) 462-9029 or for TDD, (800) 660-8005.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1994 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Harry Sizemore, assistant director of the city Bureau of Sanitation, was interviewed by Times staff writer Tracey Kaplan
The city of Los Angeles aroused furious opposition last year when neighbors learned that hundreds of sewage-bearing trucks would be emptying their loads into a newly built dumping site for septic tank waste in the Sepulveda Basin, home of the San Fernando Valley's largest park. In response, city officials delayed the opening of the nearly completed $2.3-million facility, which had been built without the intense public scrutiny that would have accompanied a full environmental report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1994 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 100 people, some wearing paper surgical masks, gathered at the Sepulveda Dam Recreation Area on Saturday to punctuate their opposition to a nearly completed central dumping site for septic tank sewage that has been put on hold pending environmental studies. The Los Angeles City Council voted in November to delay for one year approval of the facility, situated within an existing water-treatment plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to delay for one year approval of a nearly completed dumping site for septic tank waste in the Sepulveda Basin so that city officials can complete an environmental study of the project. The environmental review had been requested by environmentalists and neighbors who fear that the septic tank dumping site at the Donald C. Tillman Water Treatment Plant may create excessive truck traffic and contaminate adjacent parkland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the delight of environmentalists, the Los Angeles Board of Public Works voted unanimously Friday to launch an environmental study on the impact of a nearly completed dumping site for septic tank waste in the Sepulveda Basin. The board's vote followed an appeal by Councilwoman Laura Chick to study several possible environmental side effects of the project at the basin's existing sewage treatment plant, including excessive truck traffic and contamination of parkland next to the facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1993 | DAVID E. BRADY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation received approval in 1989 for a plan in which trucks would haul the city's septic tank waste to a dumping facility in the San Fernando Valley's Sepulveda Basin in order to control and monitor such waste. Area homeowners and environmental activists have opposed the facility, complaining that it would blight the Valley's largest recreation area and that it was approved without public reaction. J. P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1993 | MATTHEW MOSK
The El Rio girl who fell down a narrow opening in her family's back-yard septic tank died Thursday morning from a massive infection, authorities said. Amy Rocha, who would have turned 3 next month, never regained consciousness after the accident Tuesday night. Firefighters pulled her from the underground tank after she had been submerged for 10 to 15 minutes. The toddler had been playing with her two older brothers when she slipped into the nine-inch opening, relatives said.
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