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Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Reserve

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1999 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years the Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Reserve has been a great bird hangout, a retreat of sorts for the winged creatures. On any given day the area swarms with turkey vultures, mallards, double-crested cormorants and song sparrows. Even golden eagles, rarely spotted in these parts, have been known to cruise the basin's wildlife reserve. Thing is, this bird-watcher's haven wasn't all that great for humans until the reserve's space more than doubled--to 225 acres--and got a $3.
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NEWS
December 9, 2003 | Seth Shteir, Special to The Times
I'm standing on a patch of land near the intersection of the 101 and 405 freeways, one of the busiest highway interchanges in the U.S. But instead of the roar of diesel engines and honking horns, the only detectable noise is the chatter of the belted kingfisher and the rustling of cottonwood leaves. When the mist that shrouds the small pond before me lifts, I can make out the unmistakable silhouettes of great blue herons and snowy egrets.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1999 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Reserve has long been a great bird hangout, a retreat of sorts for the winged creatures. On any given day the area swarms with turkey vultures, mallards, double-crested cormorants and song sparrows. Even golden eagles, rarely spotted in the area, have been known to cruise the basin's wildlife reserve. Thing is, this bird-watcher's haven wasn't all that great for humans until the reserve's space more than doubled--to 225 acres--and got a $3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Hartman sees beauty in plants that most of us never notice. The Reseda businessman is on a mission to replace nonnative species in the Sepulveda Dam Wildlife Reserve with plants that have grown there since before the locals had a written language. Big, splashy plants produced by the horticultural hybridization machine don't mesmerize Hartman the way they do seed catalog junkies.
NEWS
December 9, 2003 | Seth Shteir, Special to The Times
I'm standing on a patch of land near the intersection of the 101 and 405 freeways, one of the busiest highway interchanges in the U.S. But instead of the roar of diesel engines and honking horns, the only detectable noise is the chatter of the belted kingfisher and the rustling of cottonwood leaves. When the mist that shrouds the small pond before me lifts, I can make out the unmistakable silhouettes of great blue herons and snowy egrets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Hartman sees beauty in plants that most of us never notice. The Reseda businessman is on a mission to replace nonnative species in the Sepulveda Dam Wildlife Reserve with plants that have grown there since before the locals had a written language. Big, splashy plants produced by the horticultural hybridization machine don't mesmerize Hartman the way they do seed catalog junkies.
OPINION
May 29, 2008
Re "New 101-405 ramp could cut traffic -- and wildlife," May 26 Caltrans' choices for easing traffic congestion at the 101-405 interchange are shortsighted, relying on immediate fixes for long-term problems. Creating more freeway lanes for cars only makes it easier to use automobiles now, leading to more congestion in the future. It is a plan that has repeatedly failed all over the Los Angeles region. Trains and busways built above the freeways, coordinated with ground transportation and free, accessible parking lots, are the long-term solution.
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
A month after federal officials recommended a $453-million restoration of the Los Angeles River, the nonprofit group L.A. Commons has organized the free Festival of Neighborhoods to highlight the ways in which the river connects the city. The third annual Found L.A: Festival of Neighborhoods on Sunday will consist of 17 events to lure people out of their own environs, including a tour of Judy Baca's half-mile-long mural in the Tujunga flood control channel, the Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Reserve in Encino, the Ballona Wetlands in Playa del Rey, Amir's Garden in Griffith Park, Compton Creek, Judson Studios in Highland Park and Hansen Dam.  The Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition will host a bike path tour at 3 p.m. beginning at Oso Park in Elysian Valley and concluding at the Golden Road Brewery alongside the river.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The San Fernando Valley Audubon Society and the California Native Plant Society are calling on volunteer weed warriors to arm themselves for the fifth annual Cleanup and Weed War on Saturday at Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Reserve. Volunteers, who will clean litter around Haskell Creek and other areas, will help eliminate invasive, nonnative weeds growing in the reserve, said Muriel Kotin, conservation chairwoman for the local Audubon Society chapter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1991 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The financial penalty imposed on a Van Nuys firm for illegal waste-water discharges led Tuesday to a mini-windfall for two conservation groups, which received $165,000 at ceremonies held in Pacific Palisades and at the Sepulveda Basin wildlife reserve in Encino. With the wildlife area as a backdrop, City Atty. James K. Hahn presented a check for $82,500 to officers of the Los Angeles Audubon Society, which will use the money to develop a master plan to enhance the bird sanctuary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1999 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Reserve has long been a great bird hangout, a retreat of sorts for the winged creatures. On any given day the area swarms with turkey vultures, mallards, double-crested cormorants and song sparrows. Even golden eagles, rarely spotted in the area, have been known to cruise the basin's wildlife reserve. Thing is, this bird-watcher's haven wasn't all that great for humans until the reserve's space more than doubled--to 225 acres--and got a $3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1999 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years the Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Reserve has been a great bird hangout, a retreat of sorts for the winged creatures. On any given day the area swarms with turkey vultures, mallards, double-crested cormorants and song sparrows. Even golden eagles, rarely spotted in these parts, have been known to cruise the basin's wildlife reserve. Thing is, this bird-watcher's haven wasn't all that great for humans until the reserve's space more than doubled--to 225 acres--and got a $3.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2008 | Pete Thomas
If YOU stop and listen carefully -- if you make a conscious effort to tune out your lush Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Reserve surroundings -- you can detect the hum of traffic on the 405 Freeway. But soon enough you'll forget the craziness that surrounds you, and become engrossed with the sights and sounds within. Swallows dart about, almost bat-like. Grackles squawk and sparrows sing.
OPINION
January 1, 2013
Re "Nature group stunned after Army Corps levels habitat," Dec. 29 The Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Reserve was the first place I took my out-of-town visitors, and my elementary school students went there each year on a field trip. It was a place where we could go to find serenity and enjoy both the scenery and the many species of birds (ranging from young bald eagles to hummingbirds, and pelicans to kingfishers), some found in few other places. To lose this wonderful place is a tragedy.
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