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Sepulveda Basin

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1989 | DAVID WHARTON, Times Staff Writer
San Fernando Valley residents are hungry for theaters, museums and galleries that would rival downtown and the Westside, but they are not eager to have a proposed arts complex built over rolling parklands in Sepulveda Basin, a Times Poll shows. Just last month, a group of Valley businessmen and art patrons who call themselves the Cultural Foundation unveiled architectural plans for Arts Park L.A., a $50-million center they hope to build amid the basin's greenery.
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NEWS
February 13, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A series of breakdowns that included badly flawed weather forecasts, delays in contacting emergency workers and confusion among city officials over closing streets resulted in dozens of motorists being trapped in the Sepulveda Dam Recreation Area earlier this week. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite protests from conservationists and neighbors, the Los Angeles Board of Public Works on Wednesday recommended opening septic waste dumping sites in the Sepulveda Basin and three other locations throughout the city. Conservationists and neighbors oppose the Sepulveda Basin site, saying the facility is likely to create traffic and odor problems in the middle of a popular recreation area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to delay for one year approval of a nearly completed dumping site for septic tank waste in the Sepulveda Basin so that city officials can complete an environmental study of the project. The environmental review had been requested by environmentalists and neighbors who fear that the septic tank dumping site at the Donald C. Tillman Water Treatment Plant may create excessive truck traffic and contaminate adjacent parkland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council, using $5.6 million in county park funds, moved ahead Wednesday to improve recreation facilities in the Sepulveda Basin and to fund a major expansion of a wildlife habitat. The funds to build new park facilities were part of $27.5 million in county Proposition A funds that the council accepted to fund some long-neglected recreation projects throughout the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1994 | TIM MAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City park commissioners approved an $11-million agreement Wednesday with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that will pay for major improvements in the Sepulveda Basin, including development of 20 acres of athletic fields and more than 185 acres of wildlife territory and an expansion of the basin's reclaimed water system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1992 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A noisy contingent of Arts Park L. A. supporters faced off against environmentalists and Van Nuys Airport officials Thursday in the latest round of public hearings on the proposed Sepulveda Basin complex. Plans for the controversial center include an outdoor amphitheater, a larger indoor theater, a museum and workshops to be built on 60 acres near the basin's northern edge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rejecting the pleas of environmentalists and homeowners, a Los Angeles City Council panel on Monday recommended opening a septic waste dumping site in the Sepulveda Basin. The Environmental Quality and Waste Management Committee voted unanimously to support the recommendations of sanitation officials to make the basin site one of four locations where the city will accept sewage from septic waste haulers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1993 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will soon release its environmental study on a proposed Sepulveda Basin arts complex, nudging the controversial project closer to approval. Arts Park L.A. would stretch across 49 acres near the intersection of Balboa and Victory boulevards. The complex would be built and operated by a private group, the Cultural Foundation, and would include a large theater, a museum and various workshops.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1995 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a only a patch of muddy land but, for a private group that hopes to build a cultural center in the Sepulveda Basin, it was a beautiful sight. While much of the basin flooded during Tuesday's storm, the northern border remained safely above water. That included the 52 acres earmarked for Arts Park L.A., a proposed complex of theaters, museums and workshops. "There was some standing water in the Arts Park area, some puddles, but no flooding," said Bob Armogeda, a spokesman for the U.S.
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