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Sepulveda Basin

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2008 | Deborah Schoch
Army Corps of Engineers officials announced Wednesday that they would stand by their decision to label the Los Angeles River as not navigable. The ruling sparked criticism from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and conservationists, who warned that it would weaken federal Clean Water Act rules protecting the river's 834-acre watershed. Critics said the decision will make it easier to develop large areas of the San Gabriel, Santa Monica and Santa Susana mountains because landowners will not be required to obtain certain federal permits.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2008 | Jennifer Oldham, Times Staff Writer
Expanding one of the nation's busiest freeway interchanges won't make life easier for some weary commuters. A new ramp proposed for the 101-405 interchange in Sherman Oaks would destroy part of a wildlife reserve in the Sepulveda Basin that provides a rare resting place for migrating Canada geese, environmentalists say. "We've trained the geese to come here for 20 years and forage in grasses we planted," said Steve Hartman, a volunteer with the California Native Plant Society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to filter treated sewage in the Sepulveda Basin have been scaled back from 300 acres to 61 acres because of opposition to the loss of recreation area, Los Angeles city officials said Monday. A study concluded that the smaller wetland project would allow the Tillman Water Reclamation Plant in Van Nuys to meet goals for reducing nitrogen in treated waste water dumped into the Los Angeles River, said Adel Hagekhalil, project manager for the Los Angeles Sanitation Bureau.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2000 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dear Traffic Talk: Heading east on Burbank Boulevard as you cross Sepulveda Boulevard or turning east onto Burbank from Sepulveda always presents a problem when the Sepulveda Basin is closed because of flooding. The only signs warning that the basin is flooded are at the entrance at the crest of the hill, and they are impossible to see until you are already there. Whenever the basin is closed, there is a major traffic jam because drivers are making U-turns to get out of the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2000
Robert Louis Stevenson wrote, "To travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive," which is a line you may want to repeat--over and over--if you try out the corn maze at the Sepulveda Dam Recreation Area this summer. Elaborate labyrinths cut into growing fields of corn have been sprouting up all over the country, including next door in Ventura County. But the 3.3-mile maze of maize that opened earlier this month is the first in a big city like Los Angeles. That's part of its draw.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2000 | GREG RISLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For just one day, dogs ruled at a park here. More than 1,000 dogs, small and large, were running and panting Saturday at the third annual Off-Leash Dog Faire. The rambunctious animals had the opportunity to have their pictures taken, zoom through an obstacle course and rest their paws at the Hounds Lounge, a doggy day-care center. A variety of vendors also catered to dogs' every need.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1999 | IRENE GARCIA
Billed as Hound Heaven, the second annual Off-Leash Dog Faire will be Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Sepulveda Basin dog park. The event will feature canine performers, pet adoptions and more than 40 vendors selling everything imaginable for dogs. There will be dog jewelry, a dog photo booth, pet day-care certificates, various dog publications and even a dog psychic. "It's just like a human psychic, except they tell your dog's fortune," said Lynn Stone, one of the event's organizers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1999 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Reserve has long been a great bird hangout, a retreat of sorts for the winged creatures. On any given day the area swarms with turkey vultures, mallards, double-crested cormorants and song sparrows. Even golden eagles, rarely spotted in the area, have been known to cruise the basin's wildlife reserve. Thing is, this bird-watcher's haven wasn't all that great for humans until the reserve's space more than doubled--to 225 acres--and got a $3.
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