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Sepulveda Boulevard

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1994 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan is pushing city transportation officials toward several highly controversial traffic management schemes, including the conversion of Pico and Olympic boulevards into one-way, seven-lane "super boulevards" and the creation of car-pool lanes on surface streets. Transportation officials hope to open a northbound car-pool lane for three-quarters of a mile on La Cienega Boulevard near the Santa Monica Freeway this month, pending City Council approval.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1994 | KAY HWANGBO
A group of community and business activists has met with Los Angeles city and police officials to talk about ways to fight the increasing problem of prostitution on Sepulveda Boulevard. As a result of the Wednesday night meeting, representatives from the Van Nuys Homeowners Assn., Sepulveda Business Watch and Sepulveda Boulevard-area Neighborhood Watch are drafting petitions urging prostitution-fighting measures to send to city and state politicians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1993 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
Cleaning up the city has become an issue where more and more merchants are taking the middle of the road. Tired of relying on the fiscally crunched city, local businesses are taking it upon themselves to target street medians for cleanup efforts as a way to enhance the community's appearance. "That's the trend that's going on," said Flip Smith, president of the Sepulveda Boulevard Business Watch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1993
Your Dec. 19 editorial "This Motel Crackdown Just Doesn't Check Out" unfairly criticizes Councilman Marvin Braude for requesting an investigation of 11 motels in his council district. He is justifiably responding to constituent complaints about prostitution activity along Sepulveda Boulevard where those motels are located. As a person who lives within two blocks of Sepulveda Boulevard, and works and shops in the neighborhood, I know that prostitute sightings are commonplace along the boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1993 | JEFF SCHNAUFER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A councilman's office is calling it the city's biggest effort to close businesses that fail to clean up prostitution, with nearly a dozen motels along notorious Sepulveda Boulevard in Van Nuys targeted for investigation by city zoning officials. But the Van Nuys police sergeant responsible for community-based policing in the area says the prostitution problem has been exaggerated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1993
I commute from Reseda to Beverly Hills five days a week. Between 6:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. I am on Sepulveda Boulevard. The reverse lane nine times out of 10 is not there, or they are picking the cones up. When it's there, it works. But I would rather the city, at the ridiculous sum of $267,000, give the money to charity, and I'll sit in my car. MICHAEL TROCCHIA Reseda
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1993 | SCOTT GLOVER
Decrying the loss of a recently discontinued car-pool lane for Valley commuters headed home from the Westside over the Sepulveda Pass, Sherman Oaks Chamber of Commerce officials are asking the city to restore the lane and make it available to all motorists. Chamber President Jeff Brain said Wednesday that he would call on Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavksy for assistance in getting the lane back. "This was really beneficial to Sherman Oaks residents," Brain said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ultimately, it was those little orange traffic cones that may have brought the car-pool lane on Sepulveda Boulevard to a dead end. The cones were used to create a northbound lane for about a mile on the southbound side of the street where it crosses Sepulveda Pass, giving homeward-bound car-poolers and buses an unobstructed drive from the Westside into the San Fernando Valley every weekday afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ultimately, it was those little orange traffic cones that may have brought the car-pool lane on Sepulveda Boulevard to a dead end. The cones were used to create a northbound lane for about a mile on the southbound side of the street where it crosses Sepulveda Pass, giving homeward-bound car-poolers and buses an unobstructed drive from the Westside into the San Fernando Valley every weekday afternoon.
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