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Sepulveda Dam

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1994 | KAY HWANGBO
Fifteen alternatives to a controversial septic waste-receiving facility in the Sepulveda Dam Recreation Area will be introduced at a city-sponsored workshop Saturday. The 15 sites have been identified by the Los Angeles Department of Public Works as alternatives to the nearly completed facility at the Donald C. Tillman Water Reclamation Plant. The May 7 workshop and open house at the Tillman plant, from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., are open to the public.
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HEALTH
February 23, 2013
The stats Distance: 1.1 miles (for the loop around the lake) Duration: 40 minutes Difficulty: 1 (on a scale of 1 to 5) Details: No dogs allowed. Wheelchair accessible. Bus: Routes 164, 236 and Woodley Station on Metro Orange Line.
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SPORTS
January 11, 1995 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Dale Luckey made it to work Tuesday, he knew the golf courses located in the Sepulveda Dam area were in trouble. Luckey, who works at the starter's desk at the Encino and Balboa golf courses, was taking his customary route to work through the Sepulveda flood basin via Burbank Boulevard when he was stopped in his tracks by a roadblock. An L.A. County lifeguard and well-known TV newsman stood in his path. Tread carefully or tread water, they warned, the rest of the road is under water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Hartman sees beauty in plants that most of us never notice. The Reseda businessman is on a mission to replace nonnative species in the Sepulveda Dam Wildlife Reserve with plants that have grown there since before the locals had a written language. Big, splashy plants produced by the horticultural hybridization machine don't mesmerize Hartman the way they do seed catalog junkies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1994 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City folks can only dream of working in the kind of pastoral setting that Fred Bermel came to every workday. He was surrounded by open fields and farmland. There was a smooth-flowing stream where white egrets and Canada geese gather. You'd never guess it's in the middle of the San Fernando Valley. For 23 years, Bermel has been the keeper at Sepulveda Dam, the centerpiece of the Sepulveda Dam Recreation Area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1991 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The blue grosbeak flew into a willow tree and half a dozen bird watchers were all atwitter. The violet-blue male grosbeak is only about the size of a fist, but to bird watchers, it was a big deal. "That's the bird of the month," gushed Dan Cooper as he led fellow birders through the Sepulveda Dam Recreation Area early Saturday morning. "They only migrate through for a short time and they're quite rare." As far as Cooper and his companions were concerned, the rarer the better.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1991 | PATRICIA KLEIN LERNER
To some, the idea of taking sunscreen to a poetry reading may seem odd. But for the poetry picnic that a San Fernando group plans Saturday at the Sepulveda Dam, it may be wise. Titled "Dam Fine Poetry," the picnic will feature informal--very informal--readings by poets and music by acoustic musicians in the grassy outdoor setting, said Michelle Klein-Hass, 27, co-founder of Abstract Productions and event organizer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1994
This is to comment on plans being proposed by environmental and recreational interests to convert the existing concrete-lined channels of the Los Angeles River and some of its tributaries to soft-bottom, green-belt streams. The following is intended to give some perspective on the magnitude of structural and hydraulic problems that must be considered in all plans to control or to live with the Los Angeles River. The elevation of the Los Angeles River at Sepulveda Dam is 700 feet above mean sea level (about 50 river miles upstream from Long Beach)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1987
I strongly oppose development of a $40-million cultural arts complex in the Sepulveda Basin. Many have characterized supporters of the recently enacted measure to restrict non-residential growth (Proposition U) as having an "I've got mine, now close the gates" mentality. In reality, voters were telling city officials and their planners, "I've got mine, but I can't get to it." The proposed cultural arts complex is another example of the lack of understanding of the serious traffic congestion in areas near the Sepulveda Dam. Residents in the surrounding communities are not culturally deprived.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1988
The Donald Tillman water reclamation plant behind the Sepulveda Dam at the intersection of the Ventura and San Diego freeways is alive and functioning fine. Aside from the small amount of reclaimed water used at its top-notch Japanese garden, 40 million gallons of pure industrial/agricultural-grade water are dumped into the Los Angeles River every day. Not too far away, completely accessible by public land, lies Sepulveda Pass, joining the Valley and West L.A. What an incredible opportunity for our political leaders to create, at very small expense (the land and water are free)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1998 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gasping for air, they hop the city fences, or crawl through holes cut in the wire, ignoring signs that warn them of the danger ahead. Inside, some huff their way along the slippery dirt and concrete banks of the Los Angeles River with only their sneaker treads keeping them from plunging into the water. Others have sunk through the thin top crust of mud beds, sometimes up to their waists. They have been trapped, as if in quicksand, in their quest to be fit.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a hopeful day at the Sepulveda Dam Recreation Area, calm and clear enough to suggest summer is on the way. So Joseph Valle and his 6-year-old cousin Reno show up around noon, all smiles. With much clanking and clattering, they pull Reno's bicycle from the back of their truck. Valle laces on a pair of skates. "Family time and exercise," the Van Nuys resident said. "Knock off two birds with one stone."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1998 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last Tuesday, 57 feet above the cafe au lait-colored water churning through the Sepulveda Dam's outlet channel in Encino, dam keeper Dave Manring was speaking assurances to the police lieutenant. From where they stood in the pelting rain, the vista was this: In front of the dam was a green slope, a damp concrete spillway, busy traffic on the San Diego Freeway-Ventura Freeway interchange, neighborhoods sulking in a gray mist. Behind the dam was a new brown lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1998 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty-seven feet above the cafe au lait-colored water churning through the Sepulveda Dam's outlet channel, Dave Manring was speaking assurances to the police lieutenant. From where they stood in the pelting rain late Tuesday morning, two vistas were offered. In front of the dam: a green slope, a damp concrete spillway, busy traffic on the San Diego Freeway-Ventura Freeway interchange, neighborhoods sulking in a gray mist. Behind the dam: a new brown lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that had some city lawmakers howling mad, the Los Angeles City Council approved an agreement Tuesday to have a dog food manufacturer sponsor the construction of the city's largest dog park in the Sepulveda Dam Recreation Area. When the matter came up, the council lost its usual decorum starting when Councilman Hal Bernson rose from his seat to "speak on behalf of the dogs." "'Woof, woof," he barked into his microphone, drawing laughs from throughout the council chambers.
SPORTS
January 11, 1995 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Dale Luckey made it to work Tuesday, he knew the golf courses located in the Sepulveda Dam area were in trouble. Luckey, who works at the starter's desk at the Encino and Balboa golf courses, was taking his customary route to work through the Sepulveda flood basin via Burbank Boulevard when he was stopped in his tracks by a roadblock. An L.A. County lifeguard and well-known TV newsman stood in his path. Tread carefully or tread water, they warned, the rest of the road is under water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1990
The story on Sepulveda Dam and Basin (April 30) only mentioned at the very end that its major purpose is flood control. We may have forgotten during these dry years, but during one 11-year period, the basin filled up three times. Twice there were between 30-and 40-year floods and once there was an 85-year flood. At a hearing some years ago, I asked the colonel in charge of the basin whether there was settling area to spare for the 100-year flood. He replied that there was not because so much land had been paved over and built up and the expansion of the Porter Ranch was contemplated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1998 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last Tuesday, 57 feet above the cafe au lait-colored water churning through the Sepulveda Dam's outlet channel in Encino, dam keeper Dave Manring was speaking assurances to the police lieutenant. From where they stood in the pelting rain, the vista was this: In front of the dam was a green slope, a damp concrete spillway, busy traffic on the San Diego Freeway-Ventura Freeway interchange, neighborhoods sulking in a gray mist. Behind the dam was a new brown lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1994
This is to comment on plans being proposed by environmental and recreational interests to convert the existing concrete-lined channels of the Los Angeles River and some of its tributaries to soft-bottom, green-belt streams. The following is intended to give some perspective on the magnitude of structural and hydraulic problems that must be considered in all plans to control or to live with the Los Angeles River. The elevation of the Los Angeles River at Sepulveda Dam is 700 feet above mean sea level (about 50 river miles upstream from Long Beach)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1994 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 100 people, some wearing paper surgical masks, gathered at the Sepulveda Dam Recreation Area on Saturday to punctuate their opposition to a nearly completed central dumping site for septic tank sewage that has been put on hold pending environmental studies. The Los Angeles City Council voted in November to delay for one year approval of the facility, situated within an existing water-treatment plant.
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