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Sepulveda Dam Wildlife Reserve

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
Steve Hartman sees beauty in plants most of us never notice. The Reseda businessman is on a mission to replace nonnatives in the Sepulveda Dam Wildlife Reserve with plants that have grown there for hundreds, if not thousands of years. Big, splashy plants produced by the horticultural hybridization machine don't mesmerize Hartman the way they do seed-catalog junkies. Hartman likes plants such as mule fat--a bushy member of the aster family that has sprung up all over the 225-acre wilderness area.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
Steve Hartman sees beauty in plants most of us never notice. The Reseda businessman is on a mission to replace nonnatives in the Sepulveda Dam Wildlife Reserve with plants that have grown there for hundreds, if not thousands of years. Big, splashy plants produced by the horticultural hybridization machine don't mesmerize Hartman the way they do seed-catalog junkies. Hartman likes plants such as mule fat--a bushy member of the aster family that has sprung up all over the 225-acre wilderness area.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Hartman sees beauty in plants that most of us never notice. The Reseda businessman is on a mission to replace nonnative species in the Sepulveda Dam Wildlife Reserve with plants that have grown there since before the locals had a written language. Big, splashy plants produced by the horticultural hybridization machine don't mesmerize Hartman the way they do seed catalog junkies.
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