Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSequels
IN THE NEWS

Sequels

ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2001
Re "A Strike? The Script Is Out of Their Hands" (by Rachel Abramowitz, April 20): Topper Lilien hit the nail on the head with his comment, "Maybe it's time to read a book." The movie industry is pathetic. It exists simply because of the insatiable desire of Americans to be entertained, often badly. In a world in which new technologies are emerging, Hollywood continues to bring us unoriginality, retread plots, boring sequels and totally predictable premises. Hopefully, there will be a strike or, in true Hollywood fashion, a sequel to the 1988 work stoppage.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Harvey and Bob Weinstein are getting the reunion they've long sought - and moviegoers could end up getting sequels to such older favorites as "Shakespeare in Love," "Swingers" and "Rounders. " The brothers' film company, Weinstein Co., has struck a production and distribution deal that reconnects them to Miramax, the company they founded in 1979 and built up with such critically acclaimed movies as "sex, lies and videotape" and "Reservoir Dogs" before selling to Walt Disney Co. in 1993.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | MARY ANN HOGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With the hype-driven success of "Scarlett," can "Huck Finn's Excellent Adventure" be far behind? Just think: If Rhett can come back, maybe Shane can too. To prepare for the day that Huck and Jim open a dude ranch in Wyoming, we present this unexpurgated look at likely sequels to some of the great works of literature.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WWRITER
When we last saw passionate lovers Owen and Anna at the conclusion of "Reckless," "Masterpiece Theatre's" surprisingly contemporary romance in three chapters, the couple had thrown caution to the wind and run off together, much to the chagrin of Anna's jealous, but terribly unfaithful, husband Richard. "Reckless, the Sequel," which premieres on PBS Sunday night, picks up the thread of that passion, which fortunately burns as hot as ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
The lesson of "High School Musical 2" is a poignant but familiar one to readers of Romantic poetry -- how quickly the bud of youthful innocence is gone! One minute you're wide-eyed and helplessly bursting out in song; the next you're eyeing your BlackBerry and ready to throttle your agent for low-bidding your next gig. Not that the gang from East High School has entered the big time. The setup of the sequel merely has the kids working at the ritzy local country club.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2004 | From Reuters
Peter Pan was the boy who would never grow old, but even the magical powers of Neverland can't stop time from running out on his copyright. So a British children's hospital that owns the rights to the story of Peter, Tinkerbell and the evil Captain Hook is searching for an author to write a sequel, to keep the money flowing when the copyright to the evergreen classic runs out. In 1929, author J.M. Barrie donated the copyright to London's Great Ormond Street Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1992 | Andy Marx
If it's kind of a remake and kind of a sequel, maybe that makes it a requel. . . . Anyway, if you can't get enough of those terrifying giant pods in the 1956 "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" and the 1978 remake, don't worry. Version No. 3, titled just "Body Snatchers," is currently filming in Selma, Ala. According to co-screenwriter Stuart Gordon ("Re-Animator"), it's more of a remake than a sequel.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"Where you from?" "France. From France." --From the coming movie "Coneheads." "Are they from another planet?" "If not, we should nuke France right away." --From "Coneheads." "Marty," "Requiem for a Heavyweight" and "Days of Wine and Roses" were excellent television dramas of the 1950s that were later turned into theatrical movies. But they were the exception in making the jump from small screen to large. For years, snooty movie people looked down their noses at television.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|