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Sequenom Inc

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BUSINESS
February 2, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Sequenom Inc., a San Diego company with no sales whose gene technology is used to treat diseases such as cancer and diabetes, tripled in its first day of trading Tuesday, giving the company a market value of $1.81 billion. Investors also snapped up initial public offerings from Turnstone Systems Inc. and Quantum Effect Devices Inc., sending the California companies' stocks up sharply. Sequenom rocketed $53.25 to close at $79.25 on Nasdaq as 8.2 million shares changed hands. The company sold 5.
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BUSINESS
May 30, 2001 | From Reuters
San Diego-based Sequenom Inc. said Tuesday it will buy Britain's Gemini Genomics for $228 million in stock, part of a wave of consolidation in the emerging genomics industry. Sequenom said the tie-up would combine its genotyping technology platform with Gemini's expertise in population genetics, expanding their potential for disease-gene discovery.
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BUSINESS
May 30, 2001 | From Reuters
San Diego-based Sequenom Inc. said Tuesday it will buy Britain's Gemini Genomics for $228 million in stock, part of a wave of consolidation in the emerging genomics industry. Sequenom said the tie-up would combine its genotyping technology platform with Gemini's expertise in population genetics, expanding their potential for disease-gene discovery.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Sequenom Inc., a San Diego company with no sales whose gene technology is used to treat diseases such as cancer and diabetes, tripled in its first day of trading Tuesday, giving the company a market value of $1.81 billion. Investors also snapped up initial public offerings from Turnstone Systems Inc. and Quantum Effect Devices Inc., sending the California companies' stocks up sharply. Sequenom rocketed $53.25 to close at $79.25 on Nasdaq as 8.2 million shares changed hands. The company sold 5.
SCIENCE
February 26, 2014 | By Monte Morin
It's billed as a faster, safer and more accurate way of screening expectant mothers for fetal abnormalities like Down syndrome, and proponents say it has already become the standard for prenatal care. But as a handful of California companies market their DNA-testing services to a growing number of pregnant women, some experts complain that the tests have not been proven effective in the kind of rigorous clinical trials that are required of new drugs. Now, a study published Wednesday by the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine has verified that one of the tests can identify likely cases of Down syndrome and other genetic disorders caused by extra chromosomes in low-risk women with greater reliability than traditional noninvasive screening methods.
NEWS
October 19, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A prenatal blood test that can detect Down syndrome in a fetus in early pregnancy is now available to doctors in 20 U.S. cities, says the developer of the test, Sequenom Inc . The test is a milestone in prenatal testing because it's the first non-invasive way to detect trisomy 21, the most common cause of Down syndrome. Until now, women have had to undergo amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling, both invasive tests, to detect Down syndrome. A more recent strategy was to combine ultrasound testing with blood tests, but that test required confirmation with amniocentesis or CVS. The blood test measures fetal DNA in the mother's bloodstream.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
The Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday accused a former executive of San Diego-based biotech company Sequenom Inc. of lying to analysts about the accuracy of the company's prenatal screening test for Down syndrome. In a complaint filed in federal court in San Diego, the SEC alleged that Elizabeth A. Dragon, the company's former vice president of research and development, told analysts in 2008 and 2009 that the company's screening test could predict with nearly 100% accuracy whether a fetus would be born with Down syndrome.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2000 | Bloomberg News
San Diego-based biotech company Sequenom Inc. (SQNM) priced 5.25 million shares Monday at $26, above the expected range of $23 to $25, raising $136.5 million. The shares will begin trading today on Nasdaq. Sequenom, whose products to analyze genes are used in clinical trials and to develop drugs, sold 250,000 more shares than expected.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2002 | TONI CLARKE, REUTERS
The annual meeting of the nation's cancer specialists, one of the largest and most closely watched medical gatherings of the year, often gives biotechnology stocks a fillip. Not this year. More bad news from ImClone Systems Inc., whose drug Erbitux failed in a mid-stage trial to halt or reverse the course of head and neck cancer, sent its shares tumbling $2.29, or 17%, to $11.12 on Monday.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2000 | Bridge News
The new biotech rush is on. Is it a prescription for disaster? With biotechnology stocks sizzling, start-ups are scrambling to get in on the action. According to Prudential Securities analyst Caroline Copithorne, 11 biotechs have filed already this year to make initial public offerings. That compares with 11 biotech companies for the entire 1999 calendar year. Genomics stocks have led the biotech sector's charge. Affymetrix Inc.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Scientists can now sequence the entire genome of a fetus from samples of a pregnant woman's blood, several recent studies have shown. It will come as no surprise that bioethicists are plenty interested in these developments and the benefits and thorny issues they will raise. The technology -- and the issues -- are discussed at length in a commentary this week in the journal Nature Medicine by Diana Bianchi of the Mother Infant Research Institute at Tufts Medical Center. Because a pregnant woman's blood carries pieces of fetal DNA, researchers can devise tests to tell with a high degree of certainty whether the fetus carries extra chromosomes (as an extra chromosome 21 in Down syndrome, for example)
BUSINESS
January 23, 2002 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J. Craig Venter, the maverick scientist whose drive to crack the human genome ignited one of the fiercest rivalries in modern science, resigned Tuesday from the company he helped launch, Celera Genomics. Venter's abrupt departure from the high-profile gene-mapping company prompted speculation that he left under pressure from Celera's parent, Applera Corp. No successor to Venter was named.
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